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Medieval priest buried 700 years ago may have been a victim of the Great Famine, archaeologists report

The remains of Richard de W’Peton, a medieval priest who died 700 years ago – on 17 April 1317 – have been uncovered in an elaborate grave.

Leprosy victim buried 900 years ago offers insights into how the disease spread through medieval Europe

Medieval leprosy victim in English cemetery was likely a religious pilgrim, possibly from overseas

He was murdered 1,400 years ago

Scottish researchers have reconstructed the face of a Pictish man they showed to have been brutally murdered 1,400 years ago.

The geography of a cemetery – the early Christian cemeteries of Skagafjördur, North Iceland

In the last decade early Christian churches and cemeteries in the region of Skagafjördur, North Iceland, have been the object of extensive archaeological research.

13th century skeleton discovered with oldest known form of maternal infection

By Michelle Donovan The 800-year-old skeleton of a young woman buried in a graveyard on the outskirts of the fabled city of Troy is yielding new insights into the evolution of bacterial infections and maternal health. Researchers at the University of McMaster’s Ancient DNA Centre and the University of Wisconsin-Madison have sequenced the complete genomes […]

Mass Burial of Black Death victims discovered in England

A mass burial of 48 bodies, known to be victims of the Black Death, has been discovered at the site of a 14th-century monastery hospital at Thornton Abbey in England.

Vampire Burials in Medieval Poland: An Overview of Past Controversies and Recent Reevaluations

Recently, the sensationalist interpretations of deviant burials have also permeated into (inter)national media, leading the general public to misinformation about Poland’s past and the mentalities of its medieval societies.

Art as data: Studying corpses by drawing them

This paper addresses the potentials of treating art as data, drawing examples from my current research on corpse positioning in early Anglo-Saxon England.

Worshipping the Dead: Viking Age Cemeteries as Cult Sites?

The examined saga accounts demonstrate that when the dead are venerated by the living and when sacrifices are made to them, these acts of worship usually occur at the graveside and not elsewhere in the landscape or within buildings.

The Dead in 3D: The Rothwell Charnel Chapel Project Online!

In the past seven months, the Rothwell Charnel Chapel Project has evolved to become more than just a research and preservation project, but has morphed into a virtual exhibit, and fascinating online learning resource that will be available globally.

The Funeral of Queen Elizabeth of York, the First Tudor Queen of England

Elizabeth of York, Queen to King Henry VII of England, died in the Tower of London on February 11, 1503. She had given birth to a daughter Katherine on February 2 and never recovered. The death was a shock to her husband, her children and to the nation.

Early Medieval Muslim Graves in France: First Archaeological, Anthropological and Palaeogenomic Evidence

Given all of these data, we propose that the skeletons from the Nimes burials belonged to Berbers integrated into the Umayyad army during the Arab expansion in North Africa.

Concerning Mass Graves: The use, development and identities within mass graves during the Scandinavian Iron Age and Middle Ages

In this Master thesis, my aim is to investigate, compare and discuss the practice of dealing with the dead and their war gear during the aftermath of a battle or an armed engagement.

Making the Medieval Relevant: Crossing Boundaries: Interdisciplinary Studies on Disease and Disability

A summary of a paper given by Professor Christina Lee at the University of Nottingham’s “Making the Medieval Relevant” Conference.

Fallen tree reveals medieval skeleton in Ireland

Last May a storm in northwest Ireland blew over a 215-year old tree. It also unearth an unusual find – the skeletal remains of a young man who lived nearly a thousand years ago.

A note on the regional distribution of pagan burials in Iceland

Comparison of the distribution of pagan burials in Iceland with medieval information about the number of farmers in different parts of the country allows a division of the country into three zones of low, medium and high frequency of pagan burials relative to the number of settlements.

The Afterlife of the Dead: Reform in Attitude Towards Medieval Burials, Corpses and Bones

The International Medieval Congress is taking place at the University of Leeds, I’m on hand this week to report on the conference. This blog post reports on my first session.

Chest burial: a middle Anglo-Saxon funerary rite from northern England

Chest burials, in which the body is interred in a wooden chest with a hinged lid, are one of the most characteristic funerary practices of the middle Anglo-Saxon period in northern England.

‘The Halved Heads’: Osteological Evidence for Decapitation in Medieval Ireland

This paper examines the osteological evidence for decapitation from 30 skeletal assemblages dated to the medieval period (6th to 16th century) from Ireland.

Over 1,000 People Discovered at Medieval Cemetery underneath the University of Cambridge

It is believed to be one of the largest graveyards of its kind found in Britain, with as many as 1500 people buried there.

Philippa Langley: The End of Richard III and the Beginning of Henry I

Amidst all the excitement, and the whirlwind that was Richard III’s reburial in Leicester, I managed to catch up with one of the world’s most famous Ricardians, ‘the Kingfinder’, Philippa Langley.

The Road to Richard: The Reburial of the Last Plantagenet

While there have been outcries over the pomp and circumstance surrounding Richard’s extravagant burial, there has also been a renewed sense of pride and upswing in popularity for this much maligned monarch.

10 Creepy Things to See at the Louvre That Are Better Than the Mona Lisa

If you’re an ancient historian, a medievalist, or early modernist, there are so many other amazing pieces and works of art a the Louvre other than these two tourist staples. Here is my list of cool, creepy, unusual and better than the Mona Lisa at the Louvre in Paris.

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