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Early medieval loom discovered in northern Iraq

A team of Frankfurt-based archaeologists has returned from the Iraqi-Kurdish province of Sulaymaniyah with new findings. The discovery of a loom from the 5th to 6th century AD in particular caused a stir.

Medieval treasure discovered at the Abbey of Cluny

In mid-September, a large treasure was unearthed during a dig at the Abbey of Cluny, in the French department of Saône-et-Loire.

The Walking Dead in Medieval England: Literary and Archaeological Perspectives

The aim of this study is to analyse the popular perception of the walking dead – ‘revenants’ – in medieval England, using both written and archaeological sources.

The Legendary King: How the Figure of King Arthur Shaped a National Identity and the Field of Archaeology in Britain

Drawing from archaeological evidence, historic, and current sources, we can understand King Arthur’s role as a symbol of Britain, which has affected the narrative of Tintagel Castle as the birthplace of King Arthur.

Excavations at Glastonbury Abbey, 1908-79: reassessing the medieval monastery

This paper shares the results of the archaeological excavations at Glastonbury Abbey; specifically, thirty-six seasons of excavations, which took place between 1904 and 1979.

The death of a medieval Danish warrior: A case of bone trauma interpretation

The study of trauma in skeletal remains is important to bioarchaeology as it can provide insight into the patterns of interpersonal violence and warfare in the past, an important aspect of human society.

Where are the dead of medieval battles? A preliminary survey

Medieval battles have always fascinated historians as well as the general public. We have to admit, however, that battles of this period are difficult to study.

The Winter Camp of the Viking Great Army, AD 872-3, Torksey, Lincolnshire

This paper provides a fresh perspective on the Viking Great Army and its impact on Anglo-Saxon England, based on new tightly dated and contextualised evidence from Torksey.

Archaeologists uncover Anglo-Saxon, medieval items in Suffolk

One of Europe’s largest archaeological digs this year has uncovered a rich tapestry of information about Suffolk’s history during Roman, Anglo-Saxon and Medieval times.

Sacred Values: Medieval Archaeology and Religious Heritage

Why do we value, conserve and interpret medieval sacred heritage? What is the potential significance of medieval archaeology to contemporary social issues surrounding religious identity, and how does this impact on archaeology? 

The prehistory of medieval farms and villages: from Saxons to Scandinavians

Those seeking to unravel the biographies of settlements, communities and landscapes back into the Early Middle Ages must chiefly rely upon material evidence locked up in the landscape, to be extracted and interpreted using approaches drawn from archaeology and related disciplines.

The Lives and Deaths of Young Medieval Women: The Osteological Evidence

Osteology, the study of human skeletal remains, can provide substantial and detailed information on growth, health and daily life of the general population.

Archaeological output in the museum setting: a case study – The Mary Rose

What is the ultimate output of this archaeological excavation? How are the results of the work communicated to a wider public in a way that is engaging for a 21st-century audience?

Video: Porpoise found in medieval graveyard

Here is the video of an interesting archaeological discovery on the island of Chapelle Dom Hue near Guernsey.

A female Viking warrior confirmed by genomics

Already in the early middle ages, there were narratives about fierce female Vikings fighting alongside men. Although, continuously reoccurring in art as well as in poetry, the women warriors have generally been dismissed as mythological phenomena.

Decline or Transformation? Archaeology and the Late Medieval ‘Urban Decline’ in Southern England

Decline or Transformation? Archaeology and the Late Medieval ‘Urban Decline’ in Southern England By Ben Jervis Archaeological Journal, Vol.174:1 (2017) Abstract: Archaeological evidence is used to examine how urban life changed in the later medieval towns of Sussex, Surrey, and Hampshire in southern England, in light of ongoing debates about the existence of a fifteenth-century urban […]

Archaeologists explore medieval manor linked with the Knights Hospitallers

University of Leicester archaeologists have returned this month to Castle Hill Country Park at Beaumont Leys to continue exploring a large scheduled ancient monument, Castle Hill, believed to be the remains of a medieval manorial site linked with the Knights Hospitallers. Last year, a two-week community dig on the site uncovered well-preserved medieval archaeology dating […]

Byzantine mosaic discovered in Jerusalem

Israeli archaeologists have discovered a 1,500 year old mosaic floor near the Damascus Gate in the Old City of Jerusalem. It is believed to be part of a hostel built by the Byzantine emperor Justinian for Christian pilgrims.

Archaeologists unearth medieval treasures at Pictish fort

Scottish archaeologists exploring a Pictish fort have discovered surprising treasures, including an eleven-hundred year old coin.

St Columba’s cell revealed by archaeologists

This discovery is massive. St Columba is a key figure in Western Christendom. He was the national patron saint of Scotland in the Middle Ages.

Digging up fun at York

The Coppergate Shopping Centre, the site of one of the most famous archaeological digs of modern times, will be transformed into a hands-on archaeological adventure this week to celebrate the annual Festival of Archaeology.

Frail or hale: Skeletal frailty indices in Medieval London skeletons

The representative nonmonastic, or lay, community in Medieval London comprises samples from Guildhall Yard (1140–1350 CE), Spital Square (1200–1500 CE), St. Mary Graces (1350–1538 CE), and St. Benet Sherehog (1250–1666 CE).

The dragon’s skull: how can zooarchaeologists contribute to our understanding of otherness in the Middle Ages?

This paper explores how the study of animal bones, and the material practices associated with responses to other species, can build on the foundations of existing scholarship on otherness, alterity and monstrosity. 

Viking ‘Thing’ discovered in Sherwood Forest

A Viking Assembly site or ‘Thing’ has been discovered in the heart of England’s Sherwood Forest.

Thousands of Vikings were based at Torksey camp, archaeologists find

A huge camp which was home to thousands of Vikings as they prepared to conquer England in the late ninth century has been uncovered by archaeologists.

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