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Science and the Future of the Human Past

Michael McCormick discusses how we can discover our ancestors and their lived experience, their successes and failures, and invent a new discipline, the Science of the Human Past.

Research into Anglo-Saxon burials uncover new insights

Christine Cave, a PhD candidate at the Austrialian National University, has developed a new method for determining the age-of-death for skeletal remains based on how worn the teeth are.

Wood Culture and Technology in the Greenland Norse Society, 10th-15th Century

Despite a relatively poor wooded environment, well preserved archaeological collections show timbers were often used, suggesting Norse people in Greenland found multiple ways to acquire the wood they needed.

Medieval sunken buildings in the North of France: from samples to micro-features

Thirty years of development of preventative archaeology in France have permitted a renewal of the research into the early medieval period.

Medieval friary where Richard III was buried to be protected

The remains of a 13th century monastic site, Greyfriars in Leicester, which was the burial place of King Richard III, has been granted protection by the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport on the advice of Historic England.

Ruins of 8th century monument discovered in Mongolia

A joint excavation team from Osaka University and the Institute of History and Archaeology of the Mongolian Academy of Sciences discovered the ruins of a unique monument surrounded by 14 large stone pillars with Turkic Runic inscriptions.

Why is Scotland so often absent in studies of Britain and Europe in the early medieval period?

David Clarke examines the question of why Scotland is so often absent from larger studies of early medieval Europe.

Remembering Winchester’s Medieval Jews: Compromises in Hidden Histories

The history of England’s medieval Jews is significant in its own right, and it is vital to the understanding of the political and social history of the region at the time. However, it has often been marginalised, and frequently overshadowed by other local narratives.

St Albans Cathedral Finds Lost Abbot

Archaeologists from the Canterbury Archaeological Trust (CAT) working at St Albans Cathedral have discovered the grave of John of Wheathampstead, a former Abbot of national and international renown, who died in 1465, and whose burial site had remained a mystery up until now. In an extremely rare development, the team also discovered three papal seals, […]

Are These the Bones of Santa Claus?

A new radio carbon analysis of a relic claimed to be part of St. Nicholas’ pelvis suggests the bone could possibly be authentic. Using a micro-sample of bone fragment originally held in Lyon, France, Professor Tom Higham and Dr Georges Kazan, the Directors of the Oxford Relics Cluster at Keble College’s Advanced Studies Centre, tested […]

How did so many Roman artifacts make it into the Viking Early Middle Ages?

This paper examines the evolution between the periods of antiquity, late-antiquity, and the early Middle Ages through archaeological findings.

New archaeology festival announced in memory of pioneer Mick Aston

Sir Tony Robinson announces DigNation – a weekend festival programme of live excavations and talks on Lindisfarne in memory of friend and Time Team co-host Mick Aston.

Early medieval loom discovered in northern Iraq

A team of Frankfurt-based archaeologists has returned from the Iraqi-Kurdish province of Sulaymaniyah with new findings. The discovery of a loom from the 5th to 6th century AD in particular caused a stir.

Medieval treasure discovered at the Abbey of Cluny

In mid-September, a large treasure was unearthed during a dig at the Abbey of Cluny, in the French department of Saône-et-Loire.

The Walking Dead in Medieval England: Literary and Archaeological Perspectives

The aim of this study is to analyse the popular perception of the walking dead – ‘revenants’ – in medieval England, using both written and archaeological sources.

The Legendary King: How the Figure of King Arthur Shaped a National Identity and the Field of Archaeology in Britain

Drawing from archaeological evidence, historic, and current sources, we can understand King Arthur’s role as a symbol of Britain, which has affected the narrative of Tintagel Castle as the birthplace of King Arthur.

Excavations at Glastonbury Abbey, 1908-79: reassessing the medieval monastery

This paper shares the results of the archaeological excavations at Glastonbury Abbey; specifically, thirty-six seasons of excavations, which took place between 1904 and 1979.

The death of a medieval Danish warrior: A case of bone trauma interpretation

The study of trauma in skeletal remains is important to bioarchaeology as it can provide insight into the patterns of interpersonal violence and warfare in the past, an important aspect of human society.

Where are the dead of medieval battles? A preliminary survey

Medieval battles have always fascinated historians as well as the general public. We have to admit, however, that battles of this period are difficult to study.

The Winter Camp of the Viking Great Army, AD 872-3, Torksey, Lincolnshire

This paper provides a fresh perspective on the Viking Great Army and its impact on Anglo-Saxon England, based on new tightly dated and contextualised evidence from Torksey.

Archaeologists uncover Anglo-Saxon, medieval items in Suffolk

One of Europe’s largest archaeological digs this year has uncovered a rich tapestry of information about Suffolk’s history during Roman, Anglo-Saxon and Medieval times.

Sacred Values: Medieval Archaeology and Religious Heritage

Why do we value, conserve and interpret medieval sacred heritage? What is the potential significance of medieval archaeology to contemporary social issues surrounding religious identity, and how does this impact on archaeology? 

The prehistory of medieval farms and villages: from Saxons to Scandinavians

Those seeking to unravel the biographies of settlements, communities and landscapes back into the Early Middle Ages must chiefly rely upon material evidence locked up in the landscape, to be extracted and interpreted using approaches drawn from archaeology and related disciplines.

The Lives and Deaths of Young Medieval Women: The Osteological Evidence

Osteology, the study of human skeletal remains, can provide substantial and detailed information on growth, health and daily life of the general population.

Archaeological output in the museum setting: a case study – The Mary Rose

What is the ultimate output of this archaeological excavation? How are the results of the work communicated to a wider public in a way that is engaging for a 21st-century audience?

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