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‘Viking Age Destruction’ found to have preserved key parts of Scotland’s largest Pictish fort

When one of Scotland’s most powerful Pictish forts was destroyed by fire in the 10th century – a time when Vikings are known to have been raiding the Moray coastline – it brought to a rapid end a way of life which had endured for centuries.

Archaeologists to go searching for lost Anglo-Saxon monastery

A team of archaeologists and history-lovers will begin searching for the Anglo-Saxon monastery established in the seventh-century in Scotland.

Living with Medieval Things: Why We Need a Global Medieval Archaeology

This essay argues for the critical relevance of medieval material culture to contemporary politics, and for the necessity of an engaged global medieval archaeology.

A case of blood vengeance from 1,000 years ago

Skull slashed by a sword and palm bones from approximately 1,000 years ago discovered in a cave in the Jerusalem hills.

The Copenhageners from 1,000 years ago

‘Were these the first Copenhageners? Did they come from the east, or were they born in the area? Did they live in a small village or a larger, active urban community? I really want to know who they were’,

Uncovering the secrets of a medieval church in Norway

A fascinating and complex history of the church has been uncovered, beginning with the original wooden church and leading to a sequence of three major rebuildings, corresponding in time with the transformation from Viking king Olaf to the royal saint St. Olaf of Norway. After more than a year of continuous archaeological investigation, a major […]

5th-century massacre site uncovered by archaeologists

Archaeologists working on the Swedish island of Öland have uncovered evidence showing dozens of men were massacred about 1,500 years ago.

Nomads were setting food trends along the Silk Roads

‘Nomadic groups likely had access to a wider variety of foods. Through their mobility, they promoted far-reaching networks along the Silk Road, and therefore had great potential to influence trends and cultural changes’

Who Were the Alans? Searching for an Early Medieval People

The Early Middle Ages saw many peoples migrating throughout Eurasia. In a talk given earlier this month at the University of Oxford, a Russian archaeologist offered new insights into the Alans.

Stowford: an early medieval hundred meeting place

In the summer of 2015 archaeological excavation sought to examine the location of an early medieval hundred meeting place (‘moot’) in southern Wiltshire.

Researchers discover early medieval women with their skulls altered

A new palaeogenomic study of early medieval people in southern Germany has revealed the presence of women who had their skulls artificially altered.

Stressing out in medieval Denmark: An investigation of dental enamel defects and age at death in two medieval Danish cemeteries

Dental enamel, which preserves a record of childhood stress events, represents an important resource for this investigation when paired with the information from adult skeletal remains, such as age at death.

700-year-old ring bearing the image of St. Nicholas discovered by a gardener in Israel

A rare impressive, intact bronze ring from the Middle Ages, bearing the image of St. Nicholas, was discovered by chance during recent landscaping work in the garden of a home in the Jezreel Valley community of Moshav Yogev.

Rabbits and the Specious Origins of Domestication

Rabbits are commonly thought to have been domesticated in c. AD600 by French monks. Using historical and archaeological records, and genetic methods, we demonstrate that this is a misconception.

The Viking Great Army in England: new dates from the Repton charnel

The size and nature of Great Army winter camps has been used as a proxy to estimate the size of the invading forces, but with divergent results. An accurate understanding of the chronology at Repton is therefore essential for improving our knowledge in these areas.

High-tech scans reveal secrets of medieval burial stones in Scotland

The latest digital photography techniques applied to the ancient burial stones at Inchinnan Parish Church in western Scotland have revealed that one of the stones, thought to be medieval in date, was originally carved much earlier..

Byzantine fountain and pools discovered in Israel

Archaeological Excavations in Ein Hanniya Park in Rephaim Valley National Park, Israel, have uncovered impressive and significant finds, including pools and an elaborate fountain dating back 1500 years, a capital typical of First Temple-era royal estates, and a rare silver coin.

Mass grave maybe from the Viking Great Army, archaeologists find

A team of archaeologists has discovered that a mass grave uncovered in the 1980s dates to the Viking Age and may have been a burial site of the Viking Great Army war dead.

Assembling the archaeology of the global Middle Ages

Responding to recent developments in archaeological theory and growing interest in the ‘global Middle Ages’, an approach to exploring relations between local and global processes in the medieval world is proposed.

Barnet: the ongoing archaeological search for Greater London’s only medieval battlefield

The Wars of Roses, the great dynastic 15th-century conflict between the houses of Lancaster and York, was marked by a series of bloody battles, one of which took place on the boundary of the London Borough of Barnet and Hertfordshire.

Researchers find first evidence of glassmaking in sub-Saharan Africa

Scholars from Rice University, University College London and the Field Museum have found the first direct evidence that glass was produced in sub-Saharan Africa centuries before the arrival of Europeans.

Medieval Chess Piece Discovered in Norway

Archaeologists recently made a particularly spectacular find in Tønsberg – a rare and richly decorated chess piece.

How Dice Changed in the Middle Ages

Whether at a casino playing craps or engaging with family in a simple board game at home, rolling the dice introduces a bit of chance or “luck” into every game.

Early Medieval Muslim Graves in France: First Archaeological, Anthropological and Palaeogenomic Evidence

This study provides the first archaeo-anthropological testimony of the Muslim establishment in South of France through the multidisciplinary analysis of three graves excavated at Nimes.

Science and the Future of the Human Past

Michael McCormick discusses how we can discover our ancestors and their lived experience, their successes and failures, and invent a new discipline, the Science of the Human Past.

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