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How Climate Change in Asia brought the Black Death to Europe

A group of Norwegian and Swiss researchers have uncovered links between climatic changes in central Asia and repeated outbreaks of the Bubonic plague in Europe, starting with the Black Death in the 14th century.

An Italian cemetery may provide clues on cholera’s evolution

Burial grounds ‘a thousand-year history’ into human health

Epidemics Past and Present: What Historic Diseases Tell Us About Future Threats

Dr. DeWitte will discuss how bioarchaeological research on past epidemics such as the Black Death can improve our understanding of emerging diseases and human-pathogen coevolution in general, and the potential it has to provide tools for dealing with disease in living populations.

How to restore virginity – advice from Caterina Sforza

If you follow the advice of Caterina Sforza, ‘you will see that thing become so narrow that you yourself will be in admiration.’

Visualizing the Body: A Symposium in Honor of the 500th Anniversary of Vesalius’ Birth

Thank-you to Kele Cable of the University of Minnesota for allowing us to post his Storify account of the Visualizing the Body Symposium, held in November 2014

Black Death DNA found in teeth

Remnants of the genetic makeup of plague bacteria have been found in thousands of victims of the Black Death and the major plague epidemics at the end of the Iron Age. The DNA analyses may predict the next plague outbreak.

Eyewitness accounts of the 1510 influenza pandemic in Europe

In 1510, there was little appreciation that a specific respiratory disease might have been recurring over centuries, but historians now believe that influenza had probably been circulating as an epidemic disease since as early as the 9th century AD, if not earlier.

Toxicology and Treatment: Medical Authorities and Snake-bite in the Middle Ages

By end of the thirteenth century, surgeons and university-trained physicians in Western Europe had a plethora of authorities from the Greco-Roman and Arabic tradition from which to consult for the treatment of snake-bites.

Vikings’ homes would have been very polluted, researchers find

Danish researchers have found that the fires used for cooking and heat in Viking-era houses would have caused significant indoor air pollution.

10 Tips on Surviving a Poisoning from Maimonides

Maimonides explains what to do when you believe someone is trying to poison you, and what were some of the most dangerous poisons of the Middle Ages.

Make-Up and Medicine in the Middle Ages

A look at cosmetics and make-up in the Middle Ages.

A History of Tonsillectomy: Two Millenia of Trauma, Hemorrhage and Controversy

‘This procedure is liable to resolve itself into physical combat between the surgeon and his patient.’

Tacuinum Sanitatis: A Way of Life

How to maintain one’s health in the Middle Ages – the advice from the Tacuinum Sanitatis

Plague Remedies from Renaissance Italy

‘Rue tops, one clove of garlic, a walnut, a grain of salt, and eat on an empty stomach everyday for up to a month, and you must be cheerful, and this recipe, it’s good against vermin and it’s perfect.

The Medieval Globe launches with special issue on the Black Death

Pandemic Disease in the Medieval World: Rethinking the Black Death is the theme for the inaugural issue of The Medieval Globe.

The rebirth of fertility: the Trotula and her travelling companions c. 1200-1450

This thesis examines to what extent women were involved in their own healthcare and that of others, in the late medieval period.

Fossil Sharks’ Teeth: A Medieval Safeguard Against Poisoning

In the Middle Ages and in the Renaissance, particularly between the thirteenth and the sixteenth century, the most common way of eliminating one’s enemy was by poisoning his food or drink at a banquet.

What can fourteenth century Venice teach us about Ebola?

Venice’s response to the plague an “example of resilience management,’ say experts

Medieval Beauty Tips

How did women in the Middle Ages make their hair, faces and skin look beautiful? The Trotula, a medieval text for women written in 12th century Salerno includes recipes and instructions that help ladies clear up their skin, colour their hair and even get rid of the stench from their mouth! Here are 15 excerpts from the Trotula that offer medieval beauty tips!

Healthy Eating in the Middle Ages: the Tacuinum Sanitatis

In the late Middle Ages, princes and the powerful learnt the health and hygiene rules of rational medicine from the Tacuinum Sanitatis, a treatise on well-being and health widely disseminated in the 14th and 15th centuries.

Þur sarriþu þursa trutin: Monster-Fighting and Medicine in Early Medieval Scandinavia

This paper seeks evidence among our extensive Scandinavian mythological texts for an area which they seldom discuss explicitly: the conceptualisation and handling of illness and healing.

Petrus Hispanus (circa 1215-1277) and ‘The Treasury of the Poor’

The identity of Petrus Hispanus is a matter of some controversy. Part of the problem is centred on the fact that ‘Hispanus’ covers the general region of the Iberian Peninsula, referred to in medieval times as ‘las Españas’ (the Spains), incorporating both present day Spain and Portgual.

Dental and oral diseases in Medieval Persia, lessons from Hedayat Akhawayni

Persian physicians had a great role in assimilation and expansion of medical sciences during the medieval period and Islamic golden age.

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