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Vikings’ homes would have been very polluted, researchers find

Danish researchers have found that the fires used for cooking and heat in Viking-era houses would have caused significant indoor air pollution.

10 Tips on Surviving a Poisoning from Maimonides

Maimonides explains what to do when you believe someone is trying to poison you, and what were some of the most dangerous poisons of the Middle Ages.

Make-Up and Medicine in the Middle Ages

A look at cosmetics and make-up in the Middle Ages.

A History of Tonsillectomy: Two Millenia of Trauma, Hemorrhage and Controversy

‘This procedure is liable to resolve itself into physical combat between the surgeon and his patient.’

Tacuinum Sanitatis: A Way of Life

How to maintain one’s health in the Middle Ages – the advice from the Tacuinum Sanitatis

Plague Remedies from Renaissance Italy

‘Rue tops, one clove of garlic, a walnut, a grain of salt, and eat on an empty stomach everyday for up to a month, and you must be cheerful, and this recipe, it’s good against vermin and it’s perfect.

The Medieval Globe launches with special issue on the Black Death

Pandemic Disease in the Medieval World: Rethinking the Black Death is the theme for the inaugural issue of The Medieval Globe.

The rebirth of fertility: the Trotula and her travelling companions c. 1200-1450

This thesis examines to what extent women were involved in their own healthcare and that of others, in the late medieval period.

Fossil Sharks’ Teeth: A Medieval Safeguard Against Poisoning

In the Middle Ages and in the Renaissance, particularly between the thirteenth and the sixteenth century, the most common way of eliminating one’s enemy was by poisoning his food or drink at a banquet.

What can fourteenth century Venice teach us about Ebola?

Venice’s response to the plague an “example of resilience management,’ say experts

Medieval Beauty Tips

How did women in the Middle Ages make their hair, faces and skin look beautiful? The Trotula, a medieval text for women written in 12th century Salerno includes recipes and instructions that help ladies clear up their skin, colour their hair and even get rid of the stench from their mouth! Here are 15 excerpts from the Trotula that offer medieval beauty tips!

Healthy Eating in the Middle Ages: the Tacuinum Sanitatis

In the late Middle Ages, princes and the powerful learnt the health and hygiene rules of rational medicine from the Tacuinum Sanitatis, a treatise on well-being and health widely disseminated in the 14th and 15th centuries.

Þur sarriþu þursa trutin: Monster-Fighting and Medicine in Early Medieval Scandinavia

This paper seeks evidence among our extensive Scandinavian mythological texts for an area which they seldom discuss explicitly: the conceptualisation and handling of illness and healing.

Petrus Hispanus (circa 1215-1277) and ‘The Treasury of the Poor’

The identity of Petrus Hispanus is a matter of some controversy. Part of the problem is centred on the fact that ‘Hispanus’ covers the general region of the Iberian Peninsula, referred to in medieval times as ‘las Españas’ (the Spains), incorporating both present day Spain and Portgual.

Dental and oral diseases in Medieval Persia, lessons from Hedayat Akhawayni

Persian physicians had a great role in assimilation and expansion of medical sciences during the medieval period and Islamic golden age.

‘I know not what it is’: Illustrating Plants in Medieval Manuscripts

If a medical literary expert such as Simon of Genoa could not always identify the plants mentioned in the literature, where would that leave physicians who probably had little time to devote to inquiries as deeply and tenaciously as Simon?

From Dog Bites to Amputations: 14th century Surgery

Henri de Mondeville (c. 1260 – 1316) was the surgeon to two kings of France – Philip IV and Louis X. In 1312 he wrote Cyrurgia (Surgery), one of the first works of its kind from the Middle Ages.

Animal bites in the Middle Ages

Medieval authors suggested varied treatments for bites. The initial act usually was to distinguish between the bites of venomous beasts (snakes, scorpions and rabid dogs were included here) and non-venomous animals (hares, cats and non-rabid dogs, for example)

When gold was medicine

If you came to a medieval physician with a problem such a trembling heart or melancholy, he may give you gold as part of your cure.

Medical Prognosis in the Middle Ages: William the Englishman’s De urina non visa and its fortune

He aimed to give to his colleagues and fellows the means to judge the state of the patient based not on the urine flask, but on the configuration of the sky at the time of consultation.

A New Look at the Role of Urinalysis in the History of Diagnostic Medicine

Before this century, urine was the predominant body fluid used by the physician for diagnosis and prognosis.

Bleeding flowers and waning moons: a history of menstruation in France, c. 1495-1761

This thesis explores early modem perceptions of menstrual bleeding, demonstrating that attempts to understand menstrual bleeding extended beyond the early modem medical world

Prevention Strategies and Changes in Sexual Mores in Response to the Outbreak of Syphilis in Europe in the Early Modern Age

Prevention Strategies and Changes in Sexual Mores in Response to the Outbreak of Syphilis in Europe in the Early Modern Age By Eugenia Tognotti Journal of Ancient Diseases and Preventive Remedies, Vol.2:2 (2014) Abstract: In the same way as AIDS in the 20th century, syphilis was the sexual scourge of the 16th century. Both of these […]

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