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Dental Health in Viking Age Icelanders

The purpose of the study was to evaluate dental health in Iceland 1000 years ago.

Demon Possession in Anglo‐Saxon and Early Modern England: Continuity and Evolution in Social Context

Sometime between around 687 and 700, a distraught father brought his raving son, in a wagon, to the island of Lindisfarne, where the holy relics of Saint Cuthbert were kept.

Investigating a Murder: The Case of the Justinianic Plague in Scythia Minor

The study beforehand applies a logical scheme of analysis over a possible presence of the Justinianic plague in the province of Scythia Minor.

Management of penile tumours during the Byzantine period

In the Byzantine period, surgery appeared to have been highly developed, as one may conclude from the surgical material included mainly in the works of Oribasius of Pergamus and Paul of Aegina.

Menstruation: curse or blessing?

Menstruation in our lifetime has been commonly called ‘The Curse’. Our sisters in the 16th century, however, welcomed this cleansing as a fertility sign from God, through the moon that determined the tides of all that flowed on the earth.

Medieval Studies and STEM

Here are 15 ways that medieval studies and STEM are working together.

The Achievements of Albucasis in the Field of Oral Surgery

In this research, we are going to study the Historical period where Albucasis lived, and the famous physicians there. Then we have to study the most important achievements of Albucasis in oral surgery

The Strange Mystery Of The King’s Head: Henry IV of France (1553-1610)

This paper reexamines the claims which were made in both the documentary and a subsequent book on the subject and, with respect, challenges the conclusions made by the investigators.

The Medieval Art of Medicine: A Poem

What was it like to be a physician in the Middle Ages? A poem by a 14th-century physician sheds a little light on the challenges of practicing medicine in his own time.

Single Genetic change created the medieval plague, researchers find

Yersinia pestis, the bacteria that caused Justinian’s Plague and the Black Death, was once only able to cause a mild gastrointestinal infection. However, researchers have found that a single genetic change to bacteria turned into one of the deadliest diseases in human history.

Caterina Sforza’s Experiments with Alchemy

She collected over four hundred alchemical, medicinal, and cosmetic recipes, and corresponded with other alchemical adepts about materials and laboratory techniques.

Dyes, Diets and Deodorants: Venetian Beauty Secrets Revealed

If you think it’s hard to keep up a beauty regime now, wait until you see what lengths the Venetians went to in order to be beautiful!

Yersinia pestis and the Plague of Justinian 541–543 AD: a genomic analysis

Between 541 and 543 AD, the Plague of Justinian, traditionally regarded as the first of three human plague pandemics, spread from either central Asia or Africa across the Mediterranean basin into Europe, killing an estimated 100 million people according to the contemporary scholar Procopius

Beyond the Medical Text: Health and Illness in Early Medieval Italian Sources

The vast majority of surviving evidence for health care, medicine and attitudes to illness in early medieval northern Italy comes not from traditional medical texts, but legal, hagiographical and archaeological sources.

Human-Bovine Plagues in the Early Middle Ages

In other words, when spreading among cattle, a now-extinct morbillivirus episodically colonized and spread in human populations during the early Middle Ages.

Mystery, Secrets and Magic

When I decided to put pen to paper for a Tudor historical fiction story, I had no idea what I wanted to write. The subject has been analyzed and romanticized for five hundred years. What could I do that would be an original slant on this iconic subject matter? After having a look around I noticed that no one appears to have the exact moment of her execution. From there, the story began to slowly develop and present itself to me.

Project to compare health of Londoners from medieval and industrial eras

The Museum of London will be starting a ground-breaking research project to explore the effects of industrialisation on Londoners.

Fifteen Anglo-Saxon Cures for Minor Medical Problems

How did people Anglo-Saxon England treat a headache or indigestion? Here are fifteen cures for minor ailments from the Lacucgna, which include what to do if your finger nail falls off, and how Jesus Christ cured Peter’s toothache.

Did Richard III keep his scoliosis a secret?

No mention of Richard’s distinctive physique survives from during his lifetime, perhaps out of respect to a reigning monarch, or perhaps because he hid it so well.

Medieval Medicine and Modern Science: An Interview with Freya Harrison

We talk about this project’s collaboration, the potential of medieval medicines, and her reaction to all the attention her research has generated.

Medieval Viagra

Over a thousand years before Viagra was invented, medieval men were looking for ways to treat erectile dysfunction. We take a look at the prescriptions offered in one of the most popular medical textbooks from the Middle Ages.

Medieval cesspit in Jerusalem reveals 15th century diseases

Analysis of a latrine in Jerusalem that dates back over 500 years finds human parasites common in northern Europe yet very rare in Middle East at the time, suggesting long-distance trade or pilgrimage routes and shedding light on prevalent infectious diseases of the age.

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