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The Medieval Magazine (Volume 3, No. 12) : Medieval Nation

In this issue we tackle National Holidays and the development of Nations, manuscripts at the Getty, and look at courtly festivities and jousting in London. We’re also baking bread Viking style, taking a trip to Avignon, and joining the medieval navy!

What is Medieval Paratext?

When considering medieval manuscripts, what is marginal, and what is not?

Imagining the Past: Interplay between literary and visual imagery in late medieval France

Her research examines the relationships between text and image in vernacular late medieval French manuscripts.

Merchants’ Marks in Medieval English Books

Merchants’ marks were used initially as a tool of commerce, on consignments of goods, in the Middle Ages.

Opening the Macclesfield Psalter: Patrons and Priories

It is undeniable that the Macclesfield Psalter is virtually unrivalled for its lavish illustrations. The gilded representations of structural, organic and allegorical elements are alluring and were certainly significant for the medieval recipients. Despite its beauty and rare pigments it was not just a work of art to simply gaze upon.

The Medieval Magazine: Be My Medieval Valentine (Volume 3, Issue 3)

We’ve just released our latest issue of the Medieval Magazine! In this issue: 5 Ways to Win Her Heart! Images of Medieval Love: The Manuscript of Pierre Sala (Stowe 955) Remembering Antiquity: The Ancient World Through Medieval Eyes Same-Sex Wedding in Renaissance Rome? How to be a Romance Hero in Five Easy Steps And much, […]

Medieval colophons: A variety of scribal annotations

Though the colophons are not as anarchic as street graffiti tends to be, both can be seen as personal marks. They are examples of people making a note of their existence.

Damaged goods: A photo essay

This essay ultimately shows that while the velvety softness of perfect skin is appealing, getting to know imperfect parchment is in the end more interesting and rewarding for the historian of the medieval book.

The Golden Haggadah now online

The Golden Haggadah, created in Catalonia around the year 1320, is among several hundred items that have recently been digitised by the British Library as part of the Hebrew Manuscripts Digitisation Project. The project has involved the photographing, description and, where necessary, meticulous conservation of 1,300 items ranging from illuminated service books to Torah scrolls, […]

Sharing the Love of Medieval Manuscripts: An Interview with Facsimile Finder

Giovanni, co-founder of the company with his wife Giulia, has told us a bit about the industry and the importance of facsimiles as teaching tools. Furthermore, for those of you looking for information about a specific medieval manuscript or facsimile, Facsimile Finder provides a database with all the information you need. So long endless searching, hello Facsimile Finder!

Piety in Pieces: How Medieval Readers Customized their Manuscripts

Medieval manuscripts resisted obsolescence. Made by highly specialised craftspeople (scribes, illuminators, book binders) with labour-intensive processes using exclusive and sometimes exotic materials (parchment made from dozens or hundreds of skins, inks and paints made from prized minerals, animals and plants), books were expensive and built to last.

Book fastenings and furnishings: an archaeology of late medieval books

Throughout the late medieval period, books were an integral part of religious monastic life, and yet such objects have received little attention from an analytical archaeological perspective, despite the significant quantity of metal book fittings recovered from archaeological sites.

Young hands, old books: Drawings by children in a fourteenth-century manuscript, LJS MS. 361

Added to manuscripts by scribes or illuminators during the production of a book, medieval marginal illuminations might include and combine defecating monks, tumbling animals, grotesques and various other ‘weirdnesses’.

Following the Leader: Erik Kwakkel on How and Why to Be an Online Medievalist

One of the best presentations I saw at the International Congress on Medieval Studies this year was by Erik Kwakkel from Leiden University.

The Global Side of Medieval at the Getty Centre: Traversing the Globe Through Illuminated Manuscripts

Los Angeles correspondent, Danielle Trynoski takes through the, ‘Traversing the Globe Through Illuminated Manuscripts’ exhibut at the Getty Museum.

Sweetheart Abbey Breviary acquired by National Library of Scotland

A monastic treasure written in Scotland 700 years ago has been acquired by the National Library of Scotland.

Traversing the Globe through Illuminated Manuscripts at The Getty

Traversing the Globe through Illuminated Manuscripts, on view January 26–June 26, 2016 at the J. Paul Getty Museum at the Getty Center, offers the opportunity to explore the strong connections between Europe and the broader world during the Middle Ages and Renaissance.

The First Manuals of English History: Two Late Thirteenth-Century Genealogical Rolls of the Kings of England in the Royal Collection

The reign of Edward I (1272-1307) witnessed the creation of numerous genealogical rolls of the kings of England from Egbert to the reigning king,

The Apotropaic Function of Celtic Knotwork in the Book of Kells

Early Irish ornament very rarely occurs without interlace, in either of its two different varieties, which are the plait and the knot. Such ornamental knotwork and interlace patterns as they appear in the full-page portraits and illustrations of the Book of Kells will be the concrete object of study of the following pages, their possible apotropaic function, their particular focus.

What type of tremor did the medieval ‘Tremulous Hand of Worcester’ have?

Scholars have recognized for some time that a prolific 13th century scribe had a tremor. He has become known as ‘the Tremulous Hand of Worcester’, or simply ‘the Tremulous Hand’, ‘hand’ being a metonym for ‘scribe’.

10 Beautiful Images from the Book of Kells

Irish monks spread the Christian faith all over Europe by their dedicated missions during the fifth, sixth and seventh centuries. The age-old Irish-Celtic culture began to fuse with the impressions gathered by the monks during their extended dangerous travels. At that time, also called The Time of Scholars and Saints, the Irish monasteries were influential […]

Manuscript fragments bear ‘striking resemblance to The Book of Kells’

Fragments of a medieval manuscript hidden in the spine of a book for hundreds of years could shed new light on Ireland’s greatest cultural treasure, The Book of Kells.

If Books Could Talk: Medieval Manuscripts in Iowa

The paper, bindings, bookplates, repairs, stains, handwritten notes, stamps and markings all leave traces that give clues to how they were made, where they have been, and can even tell about the lives of the people who have read them. We’re finding clues and following up with research to find out more.

Yale University acquires ‘treasure trove’ of medieval manuscripts

Otto F. Ege, an Ohio-based scholar and book dealer, made a controversial practice of dismantling medieval and Renaissance manuscripts and selling the individual leaves for profit during the first half of the last century.

Exploring Medieval Manuscripts: An Interview with Erik Kwakkel

‘I love that something quirky and nerdy like the medieval book is becoming mainstream.’

medievalverse magazine