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Medieval Manuscripts: Seven Songs for an Absent Lover

The Pergamino Vindel leaf is famous for its 13th century collection of seven songs written in the voice of a young woman awaiting her absent lover.

The Ideological Power of Some Almohad Illuminated Manuscripts

From the mid-12th century, the production of lavishly illuminated copies of certain texts acquired a special ideological meaning in the Maghrib, due to the rise of the Almohads.

The Authoritative Text: Raymond of Penyafort’s editing of the Decretals of Gregory IX (1234)

The Decretals has long been understood as a key text for the study of the medieval papacy, the rise of scholasticism within the universities, and the extension of the Church’s jurisdiction into almost every area of medieval life.

Using AI to uncover the mystery of the Voynich manuscript

Modern scientific methods help decipher language and meaning of medieval manuscript.

Woven Words in the Lindisfarne Gospels

This dissertation investigates the meanings and function of the five ornamental pages that decorate the Lindisfarne Gospels, a Gospel book produced in the British Isles, most likely in the Isle of Lindisfarne, around 720 CE.

Medieval Manuscripts: The Calendar in the Books of Hours of Charles of Angoulême

The book of hours is undoubtedly a most invaluable aid to understanding how men and women viewed time in both the long term and the short term in the Middle Ages.

Exhibition of Medieval Manuscripts Opening at the Art Institute of Chicago

From January 27-May 28, 2018, the Art Institute of Chicago will present a collection of manuscript illuminations spanning four hundred years of the Middle Ages and early Renaissance from countries across Western Europe.

Was a lease effective as a weapon of lordship? The use of documents in the principality of Salerno (10th-11th Century)

This paper attempts to examine the strategic use of the agrarian contracts by the landlords of the principality of Salerno in the tenth and eleventh centuries.

Outcasts: Prejudice and Persecution in the Medieval World comes to the Getty

Outcasts: Prejudice & Persecution in the Medieval World, on view January 30—April 8, 2018 at the J. Paul Getty Museum at the Getty Center, presents individual case studies that examine the way art, like language, was used to articulate a rhetoric of exclusion.

Now and Forever: The Art of Medieval Time – new exhibition comes to the Morgan Library

Drawing upon the rich holdings of the Morgan Library & Museum’s collection of medieval and Renaissance illuminated manuscripts, Now and Forever explores how people told time in the Middle Ages and what they thought about it.

Canterbury Roll now available online

In New Zealand, University of Canterbury staff and students are working to translate and digitise a unique medieval manuscript to make it accessible to the world.

Medieval Manuscripts: Epiphany in The Great Hours of Anne of Brittany

The Great Hours of Anne of Brittany is undoubtedly a masterpiece of French painting, as is fitting for a manuscript intended for someone who was twice queen of France: with Charles VIII and then Louis XII.

The Anglo-Norman Vegetius: a thirteenth century translation of the “De re militari”

The De re militari of Flavius Vegetius Renatus was written and compiled towards the close of the fourth century. Dedicated to the reigning Emperor, the work is a military treatise describing the training, organization, tactics and strategy of the Roman army.

A Record of the Defense of Xiangyang’s City Wall, 1206-1207

The focus of this thesis is the annotated translation of a diary completed in 1207 by a low ranking military officer in the Southern Song army named Zhao Wannian.

Medieval Manuscripts: The Massacre of the Innocents and Flight into Egypt in the Bible moralisée of Naples

Taking a look at how the 14th century Bible moralisée of Naples portrays two episodes of Jesus’ life after his birth.

Medieval Manuscripts: Illustrating the Nativity Scene at the end of the 15th century

The Hours of Charles of Angoulême was commissioned c. 1485 by the Count of Angoulême, and is undeniably Robinet Testard’s most personal work. Around the same time (c. 1500), in England, the illuminator Jean Poyer finished his masterpiece, The Hours of Henry VIII.

The Date of the Gough Map

The date commonly given for the Gough map of Britain, about 1360, is, in the author’s opinion, wrong. Arguments that have been offered to support such a dating are invalid.

Take a look at the Luttrell Psalter

Watch Facsimile Finder’s video taking us through this fourteenth-century manuscript.

Researchers unlock the chemistry of Irish medieval manuscripts

Hidden away among the letters and words that cover the Gaelic manuscripts of the late middle ages is a world of minerals and chemical compounds. These chemicals have their own tales to tell about the craft and ingenuity of the scribes.

1,300 Hebrew manuscript now online in bilingual website

The British Library has launched its first ever fully bilingual web resource, providing free access to its spectacular collection of Hebrew manuscripts to researchers worldwide.

Two unnoticed pieces of medieval polyphony

The two pieces introduced and briefly discussed in this article have so far remained unnoticed because of the manner of their notation. In each case pieces of twovoice polyphony were notated with the two voices separate, instead of in the score notation which has been usual since, roughly, the second half of the twelfth century.

Send Medieval e-cards this Christmas

Wish your relatives and friends a Merry Christmas with a selection of inspiring e-Cards with images from the most exquisite illuminated Books of Hours from our friends at Moleiro Editor.

The Dog in the Middle Ages

In my project, I will be looking at the inextricable link between dogs and humans in the Middle Ages, and how dogs had their place among humans, forged relationships with humans, and had their own function in the human world. 

Income and working time of a Fencing Master in Bologna in the 15th and early 16th century

Since ancient times, the master-at-arms profession has always been considered essential for the education of the nobility and the common citizenship, especially in the Middle Ages. Yet, we know nothing about the real standard of living of these characters.

How well do you know your medieval manuscripts: Beast Mode

You know these manuscripts–most of them would make ‘most famous lists.’ But that means you know them by nickname. Do you also know them by shelfmark?

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