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Frail or hale: Skeletal frailty indices in Medieval London skeletons

The representative nonmonastic, or lay, community in Medieval London comprises samples from Guildhall Yard (1140–1350 CE), Spital Square (1200–1500 CE), St. Mary Graces (1350–1538 CE), and St. Benet Sherehog (1250–1666 CE).

Verba vana: empty words in Ricardian London

Verba vana: empty words in Ricardian London By Robert Ellis PhD Dissertation, Queen Mary, University of London, 2012 Abstract: Verba Vana, or ‘empty words’, are named as among the defining features of London by a late fourteenth-century Anglo-Latin poem which itemises the properties of seven English cities. This thesis examines the implications of this description; […]

Changing Places: a comparative discussion of London and Tours in the Early Medieval Period

This paper examines the developmental stages that occurred at two settlements which saw significant changes from the 5th to 12th centuries AD; London and Tours.

Intercession and Motherhood: The Queenships of Philippa of Hainault and Anne of Bohemia

In this post, author Conor Byrne discusses the rule of two medieval queens: Anne of Bohemia and Philippa of Hainault.

Leprosy and Plague in St Giles in the Fields

Author and historian, Rebecca Rideal, on leprosy in London during the Middles Ages and Early Modern period.

The Medieval Magazine: Celebrating International Women’s Day (Volume 3, Issue 4)

We’ve just released our latest issue of the Medieval Magazine in celebration of International Women’s Day!

A Family of Mercers in Medieval London

A fourteenth century family coordinating elements of English life, the academy, the church, the crown, land, commerce and family connections to become significant participants in London life.

The Growth of London as a Port from Roman to Medieval Times

Rather than describing a history of the port of London, it seems more appropriate to say PORTS of London, since the locations, vessels, cargoes and waterfront facilities differed as much as the prevalent languages, cultures and currencies.

BOOK EXCERPT: King Cnut and the Viking Conquest of England 1016 by W.B. Bartlett

The Viking Conquest of England in 1016, saw two great warriors, the Danish prince Cnut, and his equally ruthless English opponent, King Edmund Ironside fight an epic campaign.

1390 AD: London in the Late Middle Ages

Last week, we spoke with Dr. Matthew Green about his new History of London course. This week, we take a peek into the first lecture of the series, a ‘teaser’ on Medieval London in 1390.

A History of London: 600 Years in 6 Weeks

On the tail of his successful Unreal City Audio tours, and the release of his critically acclaimed book, London: A Travel Guide Through Time, Dr. Matthew Green has launched his latest venture, the History of London Course.

Medieval English Embroidery on Display for the Last Time at the V&A’s Opus Anglicanum Exhibit

The V&A Museum opened its latest medieval exhibit exhibit on Saturday: Opus Anglicanum: Masterpieces of English Medieval Embroidery. I had the opportunity to see it opening day and it was spectacular.

Places to See: London in 7 Drinks

Can you tell history through a pint? Or a cup of coffee perhaps? According to Dr. Matthew Green you can. The historian and author turned his passion for history into Unreal City Audio: London Walking Tours.

‘Ill-Liver of Her Body:’ A Legal Examination of Prostitution in Late Medieval Greater London

I will be examining how women—specifically prostitutes—were placed under male authority and marginalized in London and Southwark, despite the divergent legal practices seen in these two adjacent areas of Greater London.

Crusaders, Pilgrims, and Relics – Bearers of the Cross: Material Religion in the Crusading World 1095-1300

The Museum of the Order of St. John is hosting a series of events and talks to promote their project: Bearers of the Cross: Material Religion in the Crusading World 1095-1300.

The Funeral of Queen Elizabeth of York, the First Tudor Queen of England

Elizabeth of York, Queen to King Henry VII of England, died in the Tower of London on February 11, 1503. She had given birth to a daughter Katherine on February 2 and never recovered. The death was a shock to her husband, her children and to the nation.

BOOK REVIEW: The Butcher Bird by SD Sykes

My review of SD Sykes follow up to “Plague Land”, her latest book, “The Butcher Bird”.

Book Review: Hidden Britain by Alvin Nicholas

Tourism with a twist? Tired of the same old tours and droning guides? Alvin Nicholas’s book on manors, mansions, castles, nooks and crannies, reveals there’s more to Britain than meets the eye.

‘Now Is the Winter of Our Discontent’: “Good” King Richard Takes the Stage

The Golden Age Theatre Company, who put on this reboot of Richard’s life, tried to portray a different side of the story

Did People Ice Skate in the Middle Ages?

How did medieval people pass the time during the coldest part of the year? I came across several instances of medieval people strapping on skates and taking a twirl (or a tumble!) on the ice. Here is how it all began!

REVIEW: The Ballad of Robin Hood

Over the holiday season, Southwark Playhouse is presenting their reinterpretation of The Ballad of Robin Hood.

Early Medieval Celtic Art in Britain and Ireland: A Curator’s Perspective

Martin Golberg, Senior Curator at the National Museums of Scotland, travelled to the British Museum to give audiences perspective on the various pieces in the exhibit as well as an introduction to what constitutes “Celtic” art.

Agincourt 600 Celebrated with Pomp and Pageantry at Westminster Abbey

600 years ago, the bells of Westminster Abbey rang out as word arrived in London that Henry V had defeated the French in Agincourt. 600 years later to the very day, the bells pealed out again to commemorate a medieval battle where the English were vastly outnumbered but still came home victorious.

Who Were The Celts? The British Museum Offers Answers with New Exhibition

The British Museum just opened its latest exhibit, Celts: Art and Identity this past Thursday, covering 2,500 years of Celtic history. The exhibit explores Celtic identity and how it eveolved from the time of the Ancient Greeks to the present through art, culture, daily life, religion and politics.

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