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A Felonious State of Mind: Mens Rea in Thirteenth- and Fourteenth-Century England

This dissertation explores the role of mens rea, or guilty mind, as a factor in jury assessments of guilt and innocence during the first two centuries of the English criminal trial jury, from the early thirteenth through the fourteenth century.

BOOK REVIEW: The Lady Agnes Mystery – Volume I

A review of the Lady Agnes Mystery by Parisienne author, Andrea Japp.

Expert examinations of wounds in the criminal court or justice in Cocentaina (Kingdom of Valencia) during the Late Middle Ages

Among the activities of doctors in the courts, one in particular stood out: the examination of wounds.

Final Month to See British Library’s Magna Carta Exhibit

It’s August, and summer has begun its inevitable wind down. Unfortunately, this means the British Library’s spectacular exhibit, Magna Carta: Law, Liberty and Legacy is winding down as well. This is the final month to catch a glimpse of the famous 800 year old document before the exhibit comes to a close on September 1st.

Cracking down on illegal gambling in Medieval Livonia

Just like their modern day counterparts, medieval cities had to deal with their own criminal underworlds – the sex trade, gambling, and violence taking place within their walls. At the International Medieval Congress, held earlier this month at the University of Leeds, these issues were explored as part of session #706: Perceiving and Regulating Vices.

Exhibit: Magna Carta Through the Ages at the Society of Antiquaries of London

If you’re passing through London and want something to do that is very quick, free, and historical, check out this great little Magna Carta exhibit at Burlington House hosted by the Society of Antiquaries of London.

Medieval Emergencies and the Contemporary Debate

This article shows that medieval France formulated its own state of exception, meant to deal with emergencies, based on the legal principle of necessity.

Magna Carta Conference Offers New Insights Into The 800-year-old Document

Magna Carta just celebrated its 800th birthday this past Monday. In honour of this incredible milestone, King’s College London, and the Magna Carta Project, hosted a 3 day conference dedicated to this historic document.

Shadow of the Sword (The Headsman)

Nikolaj Coster-Waldau gives us a sympathetic Headsman in Reformation Austria, in the ‘Shadow of the Sword (The Headsman)’.

KZOO 2015: Session #42 – Magna Carta in Context

This coming week I’ll be featuring summaries on some of my favourites sessions and papers from #KZOO2015. I kicked off my first session on Thursday with the Magna Carta.

Magna Carta: The Road to Runnymede

A look at the creation of the British Library’s Magna Carta: Law, Liberty, Legacy exhibition.

Trial by Battle in France and England

This dissertation surveys the history of trial by battle in the French-speaking regions of the European continent and England, concentrating on the period between roughly 1050 and 1350 when it was most practiced.

Law in the Lives of Medieval Women: Beyond the Magna Carta

Ruth Mazo Karras discussed, through an analysis of the lives of three women, the way law affected (or not) women at different levels of society in medieval England.

Ostsiedlung or Transition of German Law? Legal Perspective on Settlement According to German Law in Medieval Poland

Paper given at Twenty-First Annual Forum of Young Legal Historians – 6th Berg Institute International Conference

Capital and Corporal Punishment may have been rare in Anglo-Saxon England, researcher suggests

A long standing belief about early medieval justice was that many offenders would be executed for serious crimes, or face punishments such as amputations for lesser offences. However, an examination of archaeological data suggests that these kinds of punishments were rare in Anglo-Saxon England.

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