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The Emergence of “Regnal” Sovereignty at the Turn of the Fourteenth Century

By Andrew Latham Introduction As the 13th century ended, two basic models of sovereignty – understood as the supreme authority to command, legislate and judge – were in circulation in Latin Christendom.  On the one hand, there was the dualist model.  On this view, the societas christiana was divided into two domains or orders – […]

Medieval Emergencies and the Contemporary Debate

This article shows that medieval France formulated its own state of exception, meant to deal with emergencies, based on the legal principle of necessity.

A Heresy of State: Philip the Fair, the Trial of the ‘Perfidious Templars,’ and the Pontificalization of the French Monarchy

This article provides an outline for a new interpretation of the trial of the Templars, with special attention to the texts written by the instigators of the case, namely, Philip the Fair and his ministers.

Boniface VIII and Philip IV: Conflict Between Church and State

During the middle ages there were conflicts between church and state. From 1294-1303 Boniface VIII and Philip the IV, king of France had such an issue.

Tax administration and compliance: evidence from medieval Paris

We provide evidence from the Parisian tailles levied between 1292 and 1313 and other historical records that indicates that these royal taxes were collected from the Free City of Paris at a remarkably low cost, without violence and with limited recourse to legal action against tax evaders.

The Templar Trials: Did the System Work?

Although the trials in general were held with enormous personal expenditures and by obviously careful observation of procedural rules, the ’system did not really work’; it was undermined by the dynamics of a legal instrument (that is, torture), which in the end was based on the use of violence.

A Building Site in Early Sixteenth-Century Normandy: The Castle of Gaillon, Organization, Workers, Materials and Technologies

The castle of Gaillon, built in Normandy between 1498 and 1510 for cardinal Georges I d’Amboise, has been considered one of the first and most significant achievements of the early French Renaissance.

AN ENQUIRY INTO THE CHARGES AND MOTIVATIONS OF THE CAPETIAN MONARCHY BEHIND INSTITUTING THE FALL OF THE ORDER OF THE TEMPLE

AN ENQUIRY INTO THE CHARGES AND MOTIVATIONS OF THE CAPETIAN MONARCHY BEHINDINSTITUTING THE FALL OF THE ORDER OF THE TEMPLE Singhal, Chetan The Concord Review, Vol. 21:4 (2011) Abstract The Templars were a religious military Order, founded in the Holy Land in 1119. During the 12th and 13th centuries they acquired extensive property both in the crusader […]

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