Advertisement

Renaissance Woman: The Life of Vittoria Colonna

Ramie Targoff’s Renaissance Woman tells of the most remarkable woman of the Italian Renaissance: Vittoria Colonna, Marchesa of Pescara.

Italian castle designed by Brunelleschi for sale

The great Renaissance architect Filippo Brunelleschi designed this castle, which was built near Florence in 1424.

Why hasn’t an earthquake toppled the Leaning Tower of Pisa?

Ironically, the very same soil that caused the leaning instability and brought the Tower to the verge of collapse, can be credited for helping it survive these seismic events.

NEW! The Medieval Magazine, No. 110: THE RISE OF THE MEDIEVAL CITY

In this issue, we focus on cities. From Barcelona, to Constantinople, to Bologna, we cover marriage, trade, slavery, and foundation stories. Take a trip with us around the world and learn about the hustle and bustle of everyday life in the medieval city.

The Medieval Magazine: (Volume 4: No. 2): Issue 104: Winter 2018

Banish the January doldrums with our latest issue featuring Sirens, the Bayeux Tapestry, Joan of Arc, and a trip to Ireland.

Mercantile Arithmetic in Renaissance Italy: A Translation and Study of Selected Passages from a Vernacular Abbaco Work

This essay is a study of a Renaissance Italian manuscript which has been published under the title Arte Giamata Aresmetica (‘The Art Called Arithmetic’).

Cardinals and the War of Ferrara

The bestowal of a red hat can turn even the most humbly born cleric into an ecclesiastical prince, but whereas few cardinals of the modern era have been born princely, most of those created in the Renaissance period could claim to be of noble lineage.

Linking the Mediterranean: The Construction of Trading Networks in 14th and 15th-century Italy

When the Mediterranean Sea is discussed historically, it is never a simple question of geography. Its meaning remains somewhat indeterminate. It refers to intellectual journeys that do not circumnavigate any one particular region; it indicates periods that splash over.

Medieval Castle for Sale in Italy: Torre di Fiume

Located on the border of Tuscany and Umbria, this eleventh-century castle has recently been restored.

Social Perception of Infertility and Its Treatment in Late Medieval Italy: Margherita Datini, an Italian Merchant’s Wife

This article seeks to elucidate the common social perception of infertility and its treatment in late medieval Europe by analyzing the case of Margherita Datini, an Italian merchant’s wife who lived in the 1400s.

The One about Michelangelo and the Onions: Jokes and Cultural Anxiety in the Early Sixteenth Century

This article investigates the texture of relationships within elite circles in Rome and Florence in the early sixteenth-century, and shows how visual and verbal humour at this time acted as a means through which to express anxieties about the pace of social change.

Castle for Sale in Tuscany

Located in the Tuscan hills near the town of Montalcino, Castel Verdelli dates back to the 14th century.

The Bolognese Societates Armatae of the Late 13th Century

The Bologna archives preserve the bye-laws of 24 „armed societies”, dating from between 1230 and the early 1300s, written in good notary Latin. Though known to exist in other Italian city-states, only few non-Bolognese armed society bye-laws are preserved.

Income and working time of a Fencing Master in Bologna in the 15th and early 16th century

Since ancient times, the master-at-arms profession has always been considered essential for the education of the nobility and the common citizenship, especially in the Middle Ages. Yet, we know nothing about the real standard of living of these characters.

Piety and Poor Relief: Confraternities in Medieval Cremona, c. 1334-1499

This dissertation focuses on confraternal piety and poor relief in the northern Italian city of Cremona between the mid-fourteenth century and the end of the fifteenth century.

Bankers and Banking in Medieval Italy

Banks as we have come to know them in today’s world owe their origins to the innovative credit mechanisms developed in medieval Italy.

Living with Books in Renaissance Ferrara

The growth of private libraries was one of the most remarkable aspects of the history of the medieval book during the 14th and 15th centuries.

Joanna II of Anjou-Durazzo, the Glorious Queen

This short essay reflects on Queen Joanna as a test case of both the difficulties and the potential that always reside in communication and confrontation between disciplines, even when they are as closely related as history and art history.

The Walk to Canossa: The Tale of an Emperor and a Pope

Ever since it happened people have been debating what took place at Canossa. Some have called it a brilliant masterstroke by Emperor Henry IV, while others have termed it his humiliation.

The Evil That Kings Do: Kingship, Tyranny and William I in Hugo Falcandus

A study of the presentation of William I of Sicily in the work of the pseudo – Hugo Falcandus, with particular attention to the author’s views on the entirety of the Hauteville dynasty and kingship in Sicily through the lens of his reign.

Death of a Renaissance Record-Keeper: The Murder of Tomasso da Tortona in Ferrara, 1385

Beginning with a description of the murder of an Italian record-keeper at the hands of an angry mob in the late fourteenth century, this essay explores the historical background of official records destruction during the Renaissance

The Medieval Magazine (Volume 3, Issue 7)

In our latest issue: Being lovesick was a real disease in the Middle Ages! Judaism, War, and Chivalry: Why is this Knight Different than Other Knights? Travel Tips: San Lorenzo’s Medici Crypt! Crusade in Europe

The Medieval Magazine: Celebrating International Women’s Day (Volume 3, Issue 4)

We’ve just released our latest issue of the Medieval Magazine in celebration of International Women’s Day!

medievalverse magazine
WordPress Security