Advertisement

A Medieval Cure for Baldness

Medieval men also worried about losing their hair. They could turn to Hildegard of Bingen to provide them with a cure for baldness.

Book Review: A Medieval Woman’s Companion by Susan Signe Morrison

Susan Signe Morrison’s book, “A Medieval Woman’s Companion” brings the contributions of medieval women, famous and obscure, to the forefront in this fantastic introductory text.

The 
Privileging
 of 
Visio
 over
 Vox 
in
 the 
Mystical
 Experiences
 of
 Hildegard 
of 
Bingen 
and
 Joan
 of
 Arc

Even
 though
 medieval
 women
 mystics
 have
 enjoyed
 increased
 attention
 in
 recent
 scholarly
 discussion, 
a
 topic
 that
 still
 has
 not
 been
 tackled
 is
 the
 possible
 difference
 between
 seeing
 a
 vision
 and
 hearing
 a
 voice
 during
 a
 mystical
 experience
 and
 the
 ramifications
 of
 this
 difference 
in
 the
 context 
of
 medieval
 text 
production
 and 
in
 the
 status
 of
 mystics
 as
 authors.


The Herbal Cures of Hildegard von Bingen – was she right?

There is a 1 in 10,000,000 chance that Hildegard von Bingen was just making up her list of medical cures based on herbs and plants.

The Church as a Woman: The Gendered Rhetoric of the Feminine Divine

This study investigates just a small aspect of the subject, namely Hildegard’s use of gendered rhetoric in her portrayal of the personified church.

Hildegard’s Cosmos and Its Music: Making a Digital Model for the Modern Planetarium

The work reported on in this talk is a collaborative effort involving forces performative, scholarly, and technological. Because of the way Hildegard describes her understanding of the cosmos in the treatise Scivias, the model unfolds in two acts.

Hildegard of Bingen: Authorship and Stylometry

A documentary based on the article ‘Collaborative Authorship in the Twelfth Century. A Stylometric Study of Hildegard of Bingen and Guibert of Gembloux’

Feminine Love in the Twelfth Century – A Case Study: The Mulier in the Lost Love Letters and the Work of Female Mystics

This article compares the twelfth-century writings of the secular mulier in the Lost Love Letters with the work of religious female ‘mystics’ to draw comparisons about the way these authors chose to express love.

Hildegard of Bingen

Hildegard of Bingen stands out as a visionary and strong intellectual power of the Middle Ages. She was a writer letters to people of all rank and standing and of books on subjects ranging from theology to medicine, natural history, poetry and cosmology. She was also a composer, both of words and music. What really makes Hildegard extraordinary is she did this at a time when women rarely did these things.

Contextualizing Hildegard of Bingen’s Violent and Apocalyptic Imagery

This essay focuses on the graphic and violent language of Hildegard’s visions. I argue that Hildegard drew upon the political and ecclesiastical context in which she lived for her visionary experiences, rather than a fully developed form of salvation history.

The Privileging of Visio over Vox in the Mystical Experiences of Hildegard of Bingen and Joan of Arc

Even
 though
 medieval
 women
 mystics
 have
 enjoyed
 increased
 attention
 in
 recent
 scholarly
 discussion,
 a
 topic
 that
 still
 has
 not
 been
 tackled
 is
 the
 possible
 difference
 between
 seeing
 a
 vision
 and
 hearing
 a
 voice
 during
 a
 mystical
 experience


Is truth more interesting than fiction? The conflict between veracity and dramatic impact in historical fiction

I do not wish to enlist, on either side, in the battle between historians and novelists. What I would like is to suggest a foray which may at first glance seem a minor skirmish, but which may significantly affect the way in which a writer portrays people who once lived, particularly famous people.

The Representation of Antichrist in Hildegard of Bingen’s Scivias

The image thatis the subjectof this essay is one of thirty-five miniatures that once illuminated the lost Rupertsberg manuscript (Wiesbaden, Hessisches Landesbibl., MS 1, ca. 1165-75), a deluxe copy of Scivias.

You Are What You Eat: Hildegard of Bingen’s Viriditas

Hildegard argues in the beginning of Physica that humans become what they eat.

The Construction of the femina in Hildegard’s Symphonia

The architectural metaphor used throughout Hildegard’s Symphonia is not an isolated or independent occurrence; rather it is deeply rooted in her theology.

Hildegard of Bingen: Interdisciplinarian of Medieval Europe

Born in 1098, Hildegard was the tenth child to Hildebert von Bermersheim and his wife Mechtild. They were a very well‐to‐do family of the free nobility from the Bermersheim region of Germany. When she was eight years old, Hildegard’s parents dedicated her to the church as a tithe. Hildegard was placed in a Benedictine monastery in an enclosed room with an anchoress and tutor named Jutta von Sponheim.

Ten Fascinating Facts About Hildegard Von Bingen

Pope Benedict XVI made it official last Thursday: An 11th century Benedictine nun named Hildegard Von Bingen—mystic, writer, musician, philosopher and naturalist—has been proclaimed a saint

From Pagan Cosmos to Christian Creation: A Historical Path from Late Antique Priscillianus to Medieval Hildegard

Why and how do ancient and medieval Christians look so different to the sky, future and world as the pagans did?

An introduction to the investigation into the mental health of female medieval mystics

While the Medieval ascription to madness is known, in the light of recent psychological and medical insights, I will explore alternative explanations for the extreme behaviour of devout women in the Middle Ages.

Publicity through the voice of God: Hildegard of Bingen as a Public Figure in the Twelfth Century

Hildegard was peripherally involved in contemporary politics, and she was in contact with some of the most esteemed theologians of her day, including Bernard of Clairvaux and Pope Eugenius III, who, according to her vita, ‘commanded’ her to continue writing Scivias. Hildegard also communicated with the Emperor Frederick Barbarossa and Queen Eleanor of Aquitaine.

Divine Love in a World History Perspective: Contributions of Medieval Female Saint

Scholars have noted that similar notions of Divine Love have existed among the mystical traditions within Christianity, Islam and Hinduism.

Hildegard of Bingen (1098–1179) and Her Music Drama Ordo virtutum: A critical review of the scholarship and some new suggestions

Hildegard of Bingen (1098–1179) and Her Music Drama Ordo virtutum: A critical review of the scholarship and some new suggestions By Eckehard Simon Published Online Introduction: During the last three decades, Hildegard of Bingen – visionary, prophetess, abbess, correspondent, preacher, composer, and scientist – has become an icon of modern culture, outshining any other medieval […]

Kingdoms and Beasts: The Early Prophecies of Hildegard of Bingen

Kingdoms and Beasts: The Early Prophecies of Hildegard of Bingen Czarski, Charles M. JOURNAL OF MILLENNIAL STUDIES, VOLUME I, ISSUE 2, Winter (1998) Abstract The twelfth-century Benedictine author Hildegard of Bingen (1098-1179) has long been famous for her first major work known as the Scivias, a description of her visions and her commentaries on them which she […]

Please Don’t Talk about Hildegard and Feminism in the Same Breath!

I would also suggest that without the rise of second wave feminism, Hildegard’s music may never have been brought to the attention of contemporary scholars.

medievalverse magazine