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Medieval English Embroidery on Display for the Last Time at the V&A’s Opus Anglicanum Exhibit

The V&A Museum opened its latest medieval exhibit exhibit on Saturday: Opus Anglicanum: Masterpieces of English Medieval Embroidery. I had the opportunity to see it opening day and it was spectacular.

The Proud Symbolism of Heraldry: Why It Matters; Why It is Fun!

It is often regarded as an esoteric science and something for the snobs.

Fools, Devils, and Alchemy: Secular Images in the Monastery

The fool is one of the most popular and stable character types throughout cultures and times. This is especially true of medieval Europe. The fool, sometimes a jester, sometimes a clown or a trickster, is always recognizable through his abnormal appearance.

The Naples L’homme arme masses, Burgundy and the Order of the Golden Fleece: The origins of the L’homme arme tradition

The six anonymous L’Homme arme masses in naples MS VI E 40, of the Biblioteca Nazionale, have prompted heated debate concerning their genesis since Dragan Plamenac discovered them in 1925.

Heraldry in the Trecento Madrigal

This study investigates a repertoire of eighteen madrigals whose texts refer to heraldry, all of which were composed in trecento Italy.

Medieval card game looking for backers through Kickstarter Campaign

For those looking to support a medieval-themed project, Blazon! The Card Game might be just what you are looking for

15th century Italian banking records discovered in London manuscript

Records of Italian bankers partially covered over fifty years later by traditional English crests

English heraldic terminology: analysis and comparison with Czech

The first part of the essay is an analysis of lexical heraldic items. The analysis is made according to different classes of the heraldic terms, starting with the ordinaries, then describing other charges.

Heraldry and Sir Thomas Malory’s Le Morte d’Arthur

Heraldry and Sir Thomas Malory’s Le Morte d’Arthur By Lani Visaisouk Master’s Thesis, Utrecht University, 2006 Introduction: In 1136, King Arthur makes his first appearance in the English literary tradition: Geoffrey of Monmouth’s History of the Kings of Britain contains a lengthy section on Arthur. As in other early sources on Arthur, he is both […]

Ralph de Limésy: Conqueror’s Nephew? The Origins of a Discounted Claim

Ralph de Limésy: Conqueror’s Nephew? The Origins of a Discounted Claim Jackson, Peter (University of Oxford) Prosopon Newsletter (1997) Abstract The name of Ralph de Limésy is well enough known to medieval prosopographers, both as a substantial tenant-in-chief in several counties in post-Conquest England and as the founder (ca 1095) of a Benedictine house at […]

Islamic Heraldry: An Introduction

Islamic Heraldry: An Introduction By David B. Appleton Published Online (2008) Introduction: The scope of this presentation concerns the heraldry the Muslims in the late Middle Ages – that is to say, it concerns the heraldry of the Ayyubid and Mamluk dynasties of Egypt and Syria from roughly the late 12th Century A.D. through the […]

The Medieval Tournament: Chivalry, Heraldry and Reality. An Edition and Analysis of Three Fifteenth-Century Tournament Manuscripts

The contents of the codex are an exceptional primary source for the study of the chivalric culture of late-medieval Burgundy, England, and France. They include challenges to, and narratives of, combat involving influential courtiers such as Anthony Woodville, Lord Scales, brother-in-law of Edward IV, and Antoine, the Great Bastard of Burgundy, an illegitimate son of Duke Philip the Good. There is an account of a deadly combat at Tours in February 1446/7 which is vividly illustrated with eight miniatures.

Of device as device: the narrative functioning of armorial displays in Froissart’s Chronicles

Of device as device: the narrative functioning of armorial displays in Froissart’s Chronicles By M. J. Huxtable Postgraduate English: A Journal and Forum for Postgraduates in English, No.18 (2008) Introduction: In terms of socio-cultural history, the Chroniques or Chronicles of French poet and historiographer Jean Froissart (c.1337-1410) provide important access to the medieval perception of armory, […]

The Scrope and Grosvenor Controversy, 1385-1391

Caught at an event wearing the exact same outfit as someone else? Well, what if you wore the same coat of arms to a battle? In 1385, King Richard II of England invaded Scotland with his army. During this invasion, two of the king’s knights realized that they were using the same coat of arms.

Notice of Four Ancient Scottish Standards, with Detailed Description of the Recently Discovered Marchmont Standard

Notice of Four Ancient Scottish Standards, with Detailed Description of the Recently Discovered Marchmont Standard By James Balfour Paul Proceedings of the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland, Vol. 53 (1917-18) Synopsis: Examines examples of late medieval and early modern standards from Scotland. Click here to read/download this article (PDF file)

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