Advertisement

‘Pirates, robbers and other malefactors’: The role played by violence at sea in relations between England and the Hanse towns, 1385 – 1420

This thesis will argue that the impact of specific phenomena, particularly the activities of the Vitalienbrüder, on Anglo-Hanseatic relations has been not only neglected but misunderstood, and that attention to English sources can help flesh out our understanding of the Vitalienbrüder’s history.

Fair Trade?: A Look at the Hanseatic League

In the 14th century, an ongoing feud ensued between the Hanseatic League and non-Hanse merchants. Here’s a quick look at the rise and fall of the one of the most powerful organizations of the Late Middle Ages.

Skirts and Politics: The Cistercian Monastery of Harvestehude and the Hamburg City Council

In 1482, Catharina Arndes lifted up her skirts in front of the archbishop’s chaplain. She was a respectable townswoman from Hamburg, and her action was carried out in defense of the Cistercian monastery of Harvestehude which was close to the city and where several of Catharina’s nieces lived as nuns.

England’s First Attempt to Break the Commercial Monopoly of the Hanseatic League, 1377-1380

During the second half of the fourteenth century English traders first seriously threatened the Hanseatic League’s commercial monopoly in the Baltic. The League, attempting to defendits monopoly, treated the English unjustly,where upon in 1377 the English Parliament rescinded the charter that granted the League important concessions and privileges in its English trade.

Trading Networks, Monopoly and Economic Development in Medieval Northern Europe: an Agent-Based Simulation of Early Hanseatic Trade

Little is known, however, on the emergence of this Hanseatic trading system in the high Middle Ages, a period characterised by a significant migration into the Baltic region and the foundation of numerous towns alongside the Baltic sea’s southern shore.

Adventures far from home: Hanseatic trade with the Faroe Islands

he voyage to Iceland, now a major destina- tion, took about four weeks (gardiner & mehler 2007, 403; Krause 2010, 150). The Faroe Islands are situated more or less in the middle of that distance and provided a fine stop-over. The islands were an additional market for their trade business and in case of storms offered a safe and most welcome shelter.

Aspects of the Anglo-Hanseatic conflict in the fifteenth century

The German Hanse, whose rise and decline spanned almost four centuries, was a rather unique institution in late medieval Europe.

Novgorod the Great and the Hanseatic League

Novgorod played a significant role in the complex maritime networks that connected Russia with Northern and Western Europe during this period, the most important of which being the Hanseatic League, and developed into a thriving cosmopolitan society while most major Russian cities were still struggling to rebuild and adjust after the Mongol invasion.

The Hanseatic League of the Middle Ages

In the High Middle Ages, confederations of towns were the dominant characteristic of Germany, since the organization of the Empire was loose enough to allow a kind of independence to the growing cities.

The Perception and Interpretation of Hanseatic Material Culture in the North Atlantic: Problems and Suggestions

The Perception and Interpretation of Hanseatic Material Culture in the North Atlantic: Problems and Suggestions By Natascha Mehler Journal of the North Atlantic, Special Volume 1 (2009) Abstract: This paper takes the discussion on the concept of Hanseatic material culture from the Baltic and moves it west towards the North Atlantic islands and Norway, focusing […]

The Baltic – from European Sea of Troubles to Global Interface

What was historically new in medieval Europeanization wasn’t feudalism, trade or state formation, but rational, scientifically conducted disciplining (ethics and moral).

The Baltic Sea and the Sea of Japan: History of Cooperation

The Baltic Sea and the Sea of Japan: History of Cooperation By Yulia Lamasheva The journal of the study of modern society and culture, No.33 (2005) Introduction: From far away, the Baltic region looks perhaps as a rather homogeneous area. The Baltic Sea is situated in Europe, all bordering States are maritime States. However, in […]

The origin, assortments and transport of Baltic timber

The first cases of long distance timber transportation in northern Europe, observed using dendrochronology, are from Dorestad in the Netherlands and Wolin in Poland.

Urban networks and emerging states in the North Sea and Baltic Areas: a maritime culture?

If we pretend to have reached a higher level of sophistication in our thinking, by what methods can we avoid causalities as those which nowadays would generally be refuted äs simplistic?

The Hanseatic League and Hanse Towns in the Early Penetration of the North

The Hanseatic League and Hanse Towns in the Early Penetration of the North By Klaus Friedland Arctic, Vol.37:4 (1984) Introduction: The North American continent has been “discovered” two times. The first time, the son of an exile followed the route of his banished father, and continued further west. This happened in 1000 A.D., when the […]

Traders, ties and tensions : the interactions of Lübeckers, Overijsslers and Hollanders in Late Medieval Bergen

Traders, ties and tensions : the interactions of Lübeckers, Overijsslers and Hollanders in Late Medieval Bergen By Justyna Joanna Wubs-Mrozewicz PhD Dissertation, Rijksuniversiteit Groningen, 2008 Introduction: The situation at the Hanseatic Kontor in Bergen in 1469 was tense to say the least. Merchants from Kampen in Overijssel, who were members of this particular Hanseatic settlement […]

Hanseatic Cogs and Baltic Trade: Interrelations between Trade Technology and Ecology

From the inception of the Hanseatic League until the mid-fifteenth century, one ship type dominated the inland and overseas trade: the Cog.

Harmony Within: The Hanseatic City of Lübeck

The port city of Lübeck in Northern Germany is located 20 kilometers inland and is connected to the Baltic Sea by canal. It was built in the 12th century as a Baltic maritime trading centre, ruled directly by the Emperor of the Holy Roman Empire. Merchants gained power under the protection of the Emperor and […]

medievalverse magazine