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A Dynasty of Saints

By all accounts, St. Æthelthryth was married twice and remained a virgin. During her life she was a princess of East Anglia, queen of Northumbria, and finally abbess and founder of the monastery at Ely.

Isabel of Aragon (d. 1336): Model Queen or Model Saint?

This study of Isabel of Aragon (c. 1270–1336), wife of King Dinis of Portugal (1279–1325), who was venerated as a saint from shortly after her death, aims to explore the relationship between Isabel’s queenship and her sainthood.

The Medieval Magazine: (Volume 3, Issue 6)

In this issue: Predicting the Year 1336 – New feature! Women in History: An in Depth Look at Lucrezia Borgia, Top 10 Things to Do in Rome, Saints, Martyrs, and Relics.

Irish and British saints of the early medieval period

Irish saints tend to be studied en masse.

Marriage and Sanctity in the Lives of Late Medieval Married Saints

How did the saint come to marry? How are sexual relations portrayed in saints’ lives? How did the saint live after the death of or separation from a spouse?

Heavenly Healing or Failure of Faith? Partial Cures in Later Medieval Canonization Processes

When thinking of miracles as source material for the conceptions and everyday life of the laity, miracles with remaining symptoms provide an interesting sub-type of a healing miracle.

The Life of Saint Euphrosyne of Połack

Saint Euphrosyne (c. 1105-1167) was the granddaughter of the famous prince of Polack, Usiaslau (Vseslav) whose long reign (1044-1101) and many exploits – in particular his determined struggle against Kiev – made such an impression on his contemporaries that they refused to believe him to be an ordinary mortal

VIDEO: Female Sufis in the Medieval Period

Dr. Lloyd Ridgeon talks about the role of Sufi women in the medieval period. Ridgeone examines positive and negative portrayals of Sufi women in a wide range of texts.

Creating a crusader saint: Canute Lavard and others of that ilk

In the Middle Ages, saints were invoked before great, decisive battles, they sometimes participated directly themselves, and they did so more and more often after the eleventh and especially the twelfth century.

The Seafarers’ Saint: Medieval Representations of St Nicholas in the North Sea Area

The cult of St Nicholas was spread in Scandinavia in the last decades of the 11th and the first decades of the 12th centuries. Because the medieval cult of saints was not limited to the liturgy of the saints themselves, but was a wider social phenomenon.

I, Robot Saint

While it’s easy to think of the Middle Ages as a backward time in which everyone struggled with the most basic things, medieval people were no strangers to some pretty cool technology, including robots.

The ‘Miracle of Childbirth’: The Portrayal of Parturient Women in Medieval Miracle Narratives

This paper explores how tales of difficult births found in medieval miracle narratives can contribute to our understanding of the experience of pregnancy and childbirth in twelfth-century England.

How Many Medieval Saints Are There?

Even a quick glance at medieval history will reveal that there are A LOT of saints from the Middle Ages. How many are there? The short answer is that we don’t know exactly, and that the number is still growing.

Kissing Heaven’s Door: the Medieval Legend of Judas Iscariot

When we consider Judas Iscariot as he appears in the Bible in modern terms, we might think along the lines of a pantomime villain.

Miracles from Medieval Iceland

The first saint from Iceland was Thorlak Thorhallsson. The saga of his life reveals dozens of the miracles that were attributed to him after his death. Here are ten of these miracles, which reveal much about religion and daily life in medieval Iceland.

Cuthbert, Guthlac and the Life of St Antony

Christians far from Egypt have drawn inspiration from the Life of St Antony, including England’s two most popular pre-Conquest hermit saints

Holy and Unholy Miracle Workers

Examining the miracles of Byzantine saints

Katherine of Alexandria: Decline of an Empire

According to hagiographers, (C)Katherine was a princess, the daughter of Roman governor named Constus. She was well educated, beautiful and highly intelligent. She converted to Christianity at the age of 13 or 14 and caught the eye of the Roman Emperor, Maxentius (278-318 AD).

Top Ten Superheroes of the Middle Ages

Even in medieval times they had stories and legends about people with extraordinary gifts – saints and warriors with special powers. Here is our list of ten superheroes from the Middle Ages.

10 Cool Facts about Saint Catherine

Saint Catherine of Alexandria and her wheel have been well recognized symbols since the beginning of the Middle Ages. Here are 10 interesting tidbits about Saint Catherine:

Christians in the amphitheater? The ‘Christianization’ of spectacle buildings and martyrial memory

This article presents an overview of the archaeological evidence for Christian spaces inside spectacle buildings – stadia, hippodromes, theaters and amphitheaters.

The Medieval Saints of Sweden and Denmark

There is a clear link between the celebration of native saints and the ecclesiastical organisation that emerged in Scandinavia in the 12th century. Yet, according to a new doctoral thesis in history from the University of Gothenburg, important differences can be noted between Sweden and Denmark.

Which Irish Saint Are You?

Brendan, Columba, Patrick – find out which Irish Saint you are most like!

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