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Beautiful Images from the Nuremberg Chronicle

Created in 1493, the Nuremberg Chronicle is a history of the World going back to Biblical times. Written by Hartmann Schedel, it was printed in Latin and German editions with hundreds of copies being sold. The 1801 woodcut illustrations were done by Michael Wolgemut and Wilhelm Pleydenwurff. Here are some of favourite images!

Medieval Black Magic

Sins of evil black magic, as listed by the medieval theologian Burchard of Worms in the 11th century.

The Pied Piper of Hamelin: A Medieval Mass Abduction?

What really happened on June 26, 1284, in the German town of Hamelin?

Charlemagne’s Denarius, Constantine’s Edicule, and the Vera Crux

In 806 a much-discussed silver denarius bearing the likeness of Charlemagne was issued. This is called the “temple-type” coin due to the (as yet unidentified) architectural structure illustrated on the reverse side, and which is explicitly labeled as representing the epitome of “Christian Religion.”

CONFERENCES: The Stellinga, the Saxon Elite, and Carolingian Politics

This is my summary of a paper presented at the Institute of Historical Research on the causes of the Stellinga uprising in the Carolingian period.

Skirts and Politics: The Cistercian Monastery of Harvestehude and the Hamburg City Council

In 1482, Catharina Arndes lifted up her skirts in front of the archbishop’s chaplain. She was a respectable townswoman from Hamburg, and her action was carried out in defense of the Cistercian monastery of Harvestehude which was close to the city and where several of Catharina’s nieces lived as nuns.

King’s sister, queen of dissent: Marguerite of Navarre (1492-1549) and her evangelical network

This study reconstructs the previously unknown history of the most important dissident group within France before the French Reformed Church formed during the 1550s.

10 Medieval and Renaissance Things to See at the Victoria and Albert Museum

My latest visit to the Victoria and Albert Musuem: 10 Medieval and Renaissance Things to See at the Victoria and Albert Museum.

CONFERENCES: Arnold Fitz Thedmar: an Early London chronicler

Another fascinating paper given at the Institute for Historical Research in central London. For those of you interested in chronicles, urban history and London, this paper was definitely for you. Ian Stone discussed his dissertation about thirteenth century London through the eyes of wealthy Alderman, Arnold Fitz Thedmar.

Different roles of Empire(s) in the Universal Chronicle of Frutolf of Michelsberg

Frutolf, a monk of the Benedictine monastery of Michelsberg in Bamberg, wrote five years before his death in 1103 a universal or world chronicle of about 300 folios.

Rose without Thorn, Eagle without Feathers: Nation and Power in Late Medieval England and Germany

It is hard at times to take the Agincourt Carol entirely seriously. Patriotism of such brash exuberance seems more properly to belong in a brightly lit Laurence Olivier world of mid twentieth-century medievalism than amid the grim and tangled realities of fifteenth- century politics and war.

Historian to develop online edition of the Augsburg Master Builders’ ledgers

The German Research Foundation has awarded Professor Jörg Rogge of Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz a grant of EUR 400,000 to create a digital edition of the Augsburg Master Builders’ ledgers.

The Perquisite of a Medieval Wedding: Barbara of Cilli’s Acquisition of Wealth, Power, and Lands

The aim of my research will be on the one hand to highlight the beginnings of Barbara’s relationship with Sigismund; particularly their engagement and wedding…

Hungary’s Conversion to Christianity: The Establishment of Hungarian Statehood and its Consequences to the Thirteenth Century

The Carpathian Basin occupies a peculiar place in history. It was the ground where Roman-Germanic world met that of the Slavs and mounted nomad peoples, where no group had achieved sustained unity before the state of Hungary was founded.

The Kidnapped King: Richard I in Germany, 1192–1194

In 1193 the rulers of Germany and England met for the first time in history.

Top 10 Medieval Castles in Germany

Which castles should you see in Germany? Here is our list of ten castles you can explore that have largely remained the same since the Middle Ages.

Amending the Ascetic: Community and Character in the Old English Life of St. Mary of Egypt

Among the most eligible saints for such treatment, Mary of Egypt deserves particular consideration: her popularity is evidenced by over a hundred extant Greek manuscripts of her Life and her uniquely prominent position in the Lenten liturgical cycle in the Eastern Church.

The cultural identity of medieval Silesia: the case of art and architecture

The cultural identity of architecture and visual arts of the Middle Ages in Silesia can be analyzed in the following frameworks: 1.) the distinct formal features of local artwork; 2.) the specific content expressed through it. Macro factors (the type of materials and their availability) are important in architecture, as are architectural patterns and styles.

Coeur de Lion in Captivity

In December 1192 Richard I was seized near Vienna by Duke Leopold V of Austria.

The Physicality of Service in German Ideas of Knighthood, c.1200-1500

Jörg’s memoir is a particularly informative example of how one knight understood his own calling to knighthood and his practice of it. The medieval knight had a voice, and although precious few memoirs like Jörg’s exist, knightly perspectives inform a considerable breadth of primary materials.

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