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The imperial abbey of Ellwangen and its peasants: a study of the polyptych of 1337

This paper presents an analysis of Ellwangen Abbey’s polyptych of 1337, with a view to understanding better the nature of the south German rural economy in this period.

Through Trial and Error: Learning and Adaptation in the English Tactical System from Bannockburn to Poitiers

During the late thirteenth century and early fourteenth century, the English in medieval Europe fought in two wars: the Scottish Wars of Independence followed by the Hundred Years War.

Medieval Rules for Jousting

Here is a set of rules for jousting created by Alfonso XI, King of Castile, in 1330.

Move over Milan! Late Medieval and Renaissance Fashion in Venice

Milan may be Italy’s current fashion capital, but Venice had an important role to play in the development of the Italian fashion and textile industry since the late middle ages and renaissance period.

Castle Planning in the Fourteenth Century

Although in this paper it is proposed to follow trends in domestic demands and observe their effect on the form of the castle, this aspect should not properly be treated in isolation and if little mention is made of the military element it must be remembered that this is, nevertheless, always present.

Piracy and Papacy: The Legacy of Thibauld’s treasure

Pirates and popes seem to be two things that simply would not intersect owing to both time and distance, but in 1357 intersect they did. The result was a court claim that resulted claims for damages that wound up providing us one of the finest medieval cities to survive today.

The Morality of Misogyny: The Case of Rustico Filippi, Vituperator of Women

At the outset of his influential study on Rabelais, Mikhail Bakhtin makes an interesting observation. The scholar dedicates several pages to detail how the French author’s critical reception changed over time. Bakhtin illustrates how the attempt to comprehend an author can frequently be stymied by the cultural changes that occur across the centuries.

Renaissance Contacts Between Dubrovnik (Ragusa) and the Kingdom of Hungary

During the rule of the Angevin dynasty (1308-82) in Hungary, towns and cities increasingly assumed greater political influence. The first treaty between the King of Hungary and Dubrovnik (in those days Ragusa) was signed in 1358, during the reign of Louis (Lajos) the Great.

Crafting the witch: Gendering magic in medieval and early modern England

This project documents and analyzes the gendered transformation of magical figures occurring in Arthurian romance in England from the twelfth to the sixteenth centuries.

Edward II and his Children

Kathryn Warner, author of Edward II: The Unconventional King, takes a look at the English king’s three sons and two daughters.

Classical trends in Byzantine and Western Art in the 13th and 14th centuries

During the last two centuries before the Renaissance of the arts in Italy in the 15th century, different waves of classical trends marked the artistic creation of both Byzantine and western worlds.

The Rise of a Tax State: Portugal, 1367-1401

This paper uses the case of fourteenth-century Portugal to question a common assumption of “fiscal history” literature, namely the linear relationship between war-related fiscal demands increase the level of taxation.

From Dog Bites to Amputations: 14th century Surgery

Henri de Mondeville (c. 1260 – 1316) was the surgeon to two kings of France – Philip IV and Louis X. In 1312 he wrote Cyrurgia (Surgery), one of the first works of its kind from the Middle Ages.

Materiality in the Queenship of Isabeau of Bavaria

This thesis revisits the origins of Isabeau of Bavaria’s notorious reputation – her ‘Black Legend’.

INTERVIEW: A Conversation with SD Sykes about Plague Land

My interview with fiction author, SD Sykes about her fantastic medieval crime novel, Plague Land.

The Floating State: Trade Embargoes and the Rise of a New Venetian State

This paper was given by Georg Christ and examined embargoes and state formation in the late medieval and early modern period in Venice.

Rose without Thorn, Eagle without Feathers: Nation and Power in Late Medieval England and Germany

It is hard at times to take the Agincourt Carol entirely seriously. Patriotism of such brash exuberance seems more properly to belong in a brightly lit Laurence Olivier world of mid twentieth-century medievalism than amid the grim and tangled realities of fifteenth- century politics and war.

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