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The Medieval Magazine (Volume 3, Issue 7)

In our latest issue: Being lovesick was a real disease in the Middle Ages! Judaism, War, and Chivalry: Why is this Knight Different than Other Knights? Travel Tips: San Lorenzo’s Medici Crypt! Crusade in Europe

The Medieval Magazine: Celebrating International Women’s Day (Volume 3, Issue 4)

We’ve just released our latest issue of the Medieval Magazine in celebration of International Women’s Day!

The Vaults of Santa Maria Novella and the Creation of Florentine Gothic

Historians of Gothic architecture, among them Louis Grodecki, have noted that Santa Maria Novella is one of the most beautiful examples of Italian Gothic without attempting to specify just what it is that sets Santa Maria Novella apart.

How to Defeat a Tyrant: The Florentines against the Duke

In a time of crisis the Republic of Florence turned to a brash noble to lead their city. He soon turned into a disgraceful tyrant. Could the Florentine citizens overthrow him before a plot to murder hundreds of people could be carried out?

The Florentine Archives in Transition: Government, Warfare and Communication (1289–1530 ca.)

Focusing on the important case of Florence, the administrative uses of records connected to government, diplomacy and military needs will be discussed, and evidence will be provided that such documentary practices accelerated significantly during the so-called Italian Wars (from 1494 onwards).

Before the Florin: The origins of Florence’s economic boom

The minting of the gold florin in 1252 is commonly considered to herald the beginning of Florence’s economic boom.

Civic Knighthood in the Early Renaissance: Leonardo Bruni’s De militia (ca. 1420)

Leonardo Bruni’s aim in the De militia (ca. 1420) was to co-opt the most glamorous of medieval ideals, the ideal of chivalry, and to reinterpret it in terms of Greco-Roman ideals of military service.

MEDIEVAL BOOKS: Black Friday!

Here are a few recent releases for medievalists hunting for Black Friday books and early Christmas gifts!

Can Florence in the Quatrocento Help Shape Tax Policy Today?

I therefore decided to apply what I knew about tax policy—the only subject on which I was conversant and which seemed remotely relevant—to Florence in the days of the Medici, and see what happened.

Florentine merchant companies established in Buda at the beginning of the 15th century

The scope of the present article is to analyze the activity of these merchant companies through various sources housed by the Florentine National Archives and place them in the context of Florentine long distance trade.

Machiavelli and Botticelli Movies to Hit the Screen in 2016

Machiavelli and Botticelli are set to hit screens in 2016. We sat down to chat with Italian director, Lorenzo Raveggi about his two ambitious projects.

Writing about the Middle Ages – what works, what doesn’t

I’ve had ones that have done really well, while others have failed to get even a small audience. Here are examples of what has worked, and what did not work.

Foundation Myths in Medieval and Renaissance Italy

The 3 papers featured here looked at the development of the civic identities of Florence, Genoa and Rome through art, architecture and foundation legends.

Lightning Strikes in Medieval Florence

Luca Landucci writes about lightning strikes in 15th century Florence.

Top Ten Insults against Savonarola

‘He is a fruit quite worthy of his diabolical seed.’

10 Creepy Things to See at the Louvre That Are Better Than the Mona Lisa

If you’re an ancient historian, a medievalist, or early modernist, there are so many other amazing pieces and works of art a the Louvre other than these two tourist staples. Here is my list of cool, creepy, unusual and better than the Mona Lisa at the Louvre in Paris.

Plague Remedies from Renaissance Italy

‘Rue tops, one clove of garlic, a walnut, a grain of salt, and eat on an empty stomach everyday for up to a month, and you must be cheerful, and this recipe, it’s good against vermin and it’s perfect.

The Morality of Misogyny: The Case of Rustico Filippi, Vituperator of Women

At the outset of his influential study on Rabelais, Mikhail Bakhtin makes an interesting observation. The scholar dedicates several pages to detail how the French author’s critical reception changed over time. Bakhtin illustrates how the attempt to comprehend an author can frequently be stymied by the cultural changes that occur across the centuries.

Flee the loathsome shadow: Marsilio Ficino (1433-99) and the Medici in Florence

This article examines the changing political landscape of Medicean Florence, from Cosimo de’ Medici (1389-1464) to his grandson Lorenzo the Magnificent (1449-1492), through the letters of the celebrated neo-Platonist philosopher Marsilio Ficino (1433-99).

14 Reasons Why Florence is Great (in 1457)

Giovanni Rucellai, a 15th century merchant, tells us what was so great about Florence during his time.

Did Purchasing Power Parity Hold in Medieval Europe?

This paper employs a unique, hand-collected dataset of exchange rates for five major currencies (the lira of Barcelona, the pound sterling of England, the pond groot of Flanders, the florin of Florence and the livre tournois of France) to consider whether the law of one price and purchasing power parity held in Europe during the late fourteenth and early fifteenth centuries.

Florentine politics and the ruling class, 1382-1407

Although outwardly the regime respected the institutions of communal Florence and republican formalities, real power in the state supposedly resided in the hands of a narrow group of families.

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