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Cesare Borgia in a Nutshell: Book Tour and Giveaway!

This is an exciting week for book lovers at Medievalists.net. We’re hosting two book tours and giveaways! Today, we’re featuring author Samantha Morris’ Cesare Borgia in a Nutshell, and running an international contest to give away a copy of the book.

Anne of Brittany, Queen of France

This week brings us two articles from Susan Abernethy on Anne of Brittany. This first article details Anne’s life.

A Letter from Perkin Warbeck to His Future Wife, Lady Katherine Gordon

Following up on her post about Perkin Warbeck’s wife, Lady Katherine Gordon, Susan Abernethy brings us a love letter from the pretender to the Tudor throne to his future wife.

The Life of Lady Katherine Gordon

This week, Susan Abernethy brings us an article on Lady Katherine Gordon.

The Global Side of Medieval at the Getty Centre: Traversing the Globe Through Illuminated Manuscripts

Los Angeles correspondent, Danielle Trynoski takes through the, ‘Traversing the Globe Through Illuminated Manuscripts’ exhibut at the Getty Museum.

The Funeral of Queen Elizabeth of York, the First Tudor Queen of England

Elizabeth of York, Queen to King Henry VII of England, died in the Tower of London on February 11, 1503. She had given birth to a daughter Katherine on February 2 and never recovered. The death was a shock to her husband, her children and to the nation.

The Power of Medieval States – A Report from the Year 1423

A 15th-century Venetian report estimates on the military and economic strength of the kingdoms and states of Europe

Isabeau of Bavaria, Anne of France, and the History of Female Regency in France

With Charles VI and Isabeau of Bavaria the history of female regency in France takes a turn of the greatest importance, moving towards a conception of regency as a proxy reign for the king exercised ideally by the queen mother.

Agnès Sorel: Death of the Official Mistress of the King

Some people are born to break the rules, and one of those people was Agnès Sorel.

The Wars of the Roses, by John Ashdown-Hill

John Ashdown-Hill gets right to the heart of this ‘thorny’ subject, dispelling the myths and bringing clarity to a topic often shrouded in confusion.

For the Knyʒhtys tabylle and for the Kyngges tabylle: An Edition of the Fifteenth-Century Middle English Cookery Recipes in London, British Library’s MS Sloane 442

The present thesis offers an edition of some fifteenth century Middle English cookery recipes, more specifically those of the Sloane 442 manuscript (MS Sloane 442), located at the British Library, London. The cookery recipes of this collection were most likely meant for the tables of the upper classes

John Hardyng and his Chronicle

Hardyng, an ex-soldier and spy of Henry V, set about composing the work after he ‘retired’ to the Augustinian priory at South Kyme, Lincolnshire, in the 1440s or 1450s.

Walk this Way: Two Journeys to Jerusalem in the Fifteenth Century

This paper appraises place pilgrimage to Jerusalem in two late-medieval English texts: The Itineraries of William Wey and The Book of Margery Kempe.

Technological Determinisms of Victory at the Battle of Agincourt

This article takes issue with the deterministic conclusions of a recent study by three scientists who investigated the effects of wearing armour on soldier exhaustion during the battle of Agincourt.

Agincourt 1415 – 2015

Anne Curry talks about the myths and history of the Battle of Agincourt

Agincourt 600 Celebrated with Pomp and Pageantry at Westminster Abbey

600 years ago, the bells of Westminster Abbey rang out as word arrived in London that Henry V had defeated the French in Agincourt. 600 years later to the very day, the bells pealed out again to commemorate a medieval battle where the English were vastly outnumbered but still came home victorious.

Celebrating Agincourt 600 at the Wallace Collection

This week, historians around the world are gearing up to commemorate the 600th anniversary of the Battle of Agincourt, one of the most significant battles of the Hundred Year’s War.

Agincourt 1415: The Battle

What you haven’t got is an ordered advance – you’ve got complete and total chaos.

Five Myths about the Battle of Agincourt

Anne Curry explains that ‘no other battle has generated so much interest or some much myth’ as the Battle of Agincourt, fought on October 25, 1415.

The King’s Welshmen: Welsh Involvement in the Expeditionary Army of 1415

This paper examines the evidence behind the claims that it was Welsh archers that won the battle of Agincourt for Henry V. As might be expected, it is a little less clear-cut than that.

From Agincourt (1415) to Fornovo (1495): aspects of the writing of warfare in French and Burgundian 15th century historiographical literature

The object of this thesis is to inquire into some major aspects of the historiographical writing of war in France and Burgundy, from Henry V’s invasion of France in 1415 to the first wars of Italy.

Honour, community and hierarchy in the feasts of the archery and crossbow guilds of Bruges, 1445–81

Archery and crossbow guilds first appeared in the fourteenth century in response to the needs of town defence and princely calls for troops. By the fifteenth century these guilds existed across northern Europe.

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