For the Knyʒhtys tabylle and for the Kyngges tabylle: An Edition of the Fifteenth-Century Middle English Cookery Recipes in London, British Library’s MS Sloane 442

Medieval Cooking - A cook at the stove with his trademark ladle; woodcut illustration from Kuchenmaistrey, the first printed cookbook in German, woodcut, 1485

The present thesis offers an edition of some fifteenth century Middle English cookery recipes, more specifically those of the Sloane 442 manuscript (MS Sloane 442), located at the British Library, London. The cookery recipes of this collection were most likely meant for the tables of the upper classes

John Hardyng and his Chronicle

John Hardyng Chronicle

Hardyng, an ex-soldier and spy of Henry V, set about composing the work after he ‘retired’ to the Augustinian priory at South Kyme, Lincolnshire, in the 1440s or 1450s.

Walk this Way: Two Journeys to Jerusalem in the Fifteenth Century

Depiction of Jerusalem in the 15th century, by Hartmann Schedel

This paper appraises place pilgrimage to Jerusalem in two late-medieval English texts: The Itineraries of William Wey and The Book of Margery Kempe.

Technological Determinisms of Victory at the Battle of Agincourt

The Battle of Agincourt from Enguerrand de Monstrelet, Chronique de France. French. Manuscript op parchment, 266 ff., 405 x 300 mm. Brugge(?), c.1495

This article takes issue with the deterministic conclusions of a recent study by three scientists who investigated the effects of wearing armour on soldier exhaustion during the battle of Agincourt.

Agincourt 1415 – 2015

Agincourt 1415 - 2015 Anne Curry

Anne Curry talks about the myths and history of the Battle of Agincourt

Agincourt 600 Celebrated with Pomp and Pageantry at Westminster Abbey

Diana Heath, Metalwork Conservator lays Henry V's sword on the High Altar at Westminster Abbey. Photo courtesy of Dean & Chapter of Westminster.

600 years ago, the bells of Westminster Abbey rang out as word arrived in London that Henry V had defeated the French in Agincourt. 600 years later to the very day, the bells pealed out again to commemorate a medieval battle where the English were vastly outnumbered but still came home victorious.

Celebrating Agincourt 600 at the Wallace Collection

Italian Gauntlets, 1390, inscribed wit hthe words, 'AMOR' (love). The Wallace Collection. Photo by

This week, historians around the world are gearing up to commemorate the 600th anniversary of the Battle of Agincourt, one of the most significant battles of the Hundred Year’s War.

Agincourt 1415: The Battle

Matthew Bennett agincourt

What you haven’t got is an ordered advance – you’ve got complete and total chaos.

Five Myths about the Battle of Agincourt

myths of the battle of agincourt

Anne Curry explains that ‘no other battle has generated so much interest or some much myth’ as the Battle of Agincourt, fought on October 25, 1415.

The King’s Welshmen: Welsh Involvement in the Expeditionary Army of 1415

Illustration of a Welsh archer from the late 13th century

This paper examines the evidence behind the claims that it was Welsh archers that won the battle of Agincourt for Henry V. As might be expected, it is a little less clear-cut than that.

From Agincourt (1415) to Fornovo (1495): aspects of the writing of warfare in French and Burgundian 15th century historiographical literature

Carte moderne de France par Pietro del Massaio et Hugues Commineau, vers 1470-1480. Cosmographie de Ptolémée, Paris, Bibliothèque Nationale de France, latin 4802, fol. 125v-126.

The object of this thesis is to inquire into some major aspects of the historiographical writing of war in France and Burgundy, from Henry V’s invasion of France in 1415 to the first wars of Italy.

A Medieval Love Letter (and eat your meat)

Medieval Love Letter

‘I pray you, my own sweet cousin even as you love me, to be happy and to eat your meat like a woman.’

Honour, community and hierarchy in the feasts of the archery and crossbow guilds of Bruges, 1445–81

15th century shooting - image by Diebold Schilling the Younger

Archery and crossbow guilds first appeared in the fourteenth century in response to the needs of town defence and princely calls for troops. By the fifteenth century these guilds existed across northern Europe.

Beautiful 15th century sculpture now on display at the Getty Museum

Saint Philip by the Master of the Rimini Altarpiece - photo courtesy The Getty Museum

The Getty Museum is now showing its latest acquisition – a rare medieval alabaster sculpture of Saint Philip by the Master of the Rimini Altarpiece.

Another Medieval Drinking Song

Image by Matthäus Fridrich from the 16th century

But bring us in good ale, good ale, and bring us in good ale,
For our blessed Lady’s sake, bring us in good ale!

Florentine merchant companies established in Buda at the beginning of the 15th century

Buda during the Middle Ages, woodcut from the Nuremberg Chronicle (1493)

The scope of the present article is to analyze the activity of these merchant companies through various sources housed by the Florentine National Archives and place them in the context of Florentine long distance trade.

Machiavelli and Botticelli Movies to Hit the Screen in 2016

Machiavelli The Prince by Lorenzo Raveggi.

Machiavelli and Botticelli are set to hit screens in 2016. We sat down to chat with Italian director, Lorenzo Raveggi about his two ambitious projects.

Why Did Valarte Die? Death of a Danish Knight during Expedition to West Africa in mid-15th Century

Africa Map from 1502

‘The fame of their affair having spread through the different parts of the world, it arrived at the Court of the King of Denmark and Sweden and Norway; and as you see how noble men venture themselves with the desire to see and know such things’

Image and Meaning in the Floral Borders of the Hours of Catherine of Cleves

Hours of Catherine of Cleves 1

The Book of Hours of Catherine of Cleves, produced in the Netherlands in the early 15th century, is one of the most beautiful and complex manuscripts of the late Middle Ages.

Cracking down on illegal gambling in Medieval Livonia

by Master Jean de Mauléon (c.1535)

Just like their modern day counterparts, medieval cities had to deal with their own criminal underworlds – the sex trade, gambling, and violence taking place within their walls. At the International Medieval Congress, held earlier this month at the University of Leeds, these issues were explored as part of session #706: Perceiving and Regulating Vices.

Richard Duke of Gloucester as Lord Protector and High Constable of England

Richard Duke of Gloucester as Lord Protector and High Constable of England

During Richard’s protectorate he was responsible, as far as we know, for four executions for treason

Caterina Sforza’s Experiments with Alchemy

Caterina Sforza

She collected over four hundred alchemical, medicinal, and cosmetic recipes, and corresponded with other alchemical adepts about materials and laboratory techniques.

Owain’s Revolt? Glyn Dŵr’s role in the outbreak of the rebellion

Owain Glyn Dwr statue at Corwen-  photo by Lyn Dafis / Flickr

This article asserts that Owain Glyn Dŵr was neither the instigator nor, initially, the sole leader of the revolt for which he has become well known. It also challenges the idea that there was just one rebellion and casts doubt on the notion that he proclaimed himself Prince of Wales on 16 September 1400.

Margery Kempe and the People on the Periphery

The first page of the Book of Margery Kempe - British Library Add MS 61823

There are few medieval texts I find so entertaining as The Book of Margery Kempe, the fifteenth-century story of a seemingly ordinary woman of Bishops Lynn, England, whose life was transformed by visions of Jesus. T

Papers on Medieval Prosopography: Session #47 at KZOO 2015

Pieter Brueghel - Kermesse (The Feast of Saint George)

Three fantastic papers on Prosopography from #KZOO2015.

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