The Book of Dame Frevisse: Margaret Frazer’s Medieval Mysteries

margaret frazer novice tale

Margaret Frazer has written and published fifteen medieval mystery books thus far. These books are considered detective fiction.

Book Review: Rise of the Wolf, by Steven A. McKay

rise of the wolf

Bottom line: I can’t recommend this novel strongly enough. You should buy it now.

Literature in an Apocalyptic Age; or, How to End a Romance

Yvain fighting Gawain. Medieval illumination from Chrétien de Troyes's romance, Yvain, le Chevalier au Lion

No literature of the Middle Ages has so successfully captured the imagination of recent times as has the medieval romance.

The Archer’s Loss: England’s War, Fate’s Arrows

New Front Cover

As England crumbles, so does Thomas as he rails against the world which has snatched life and love away from him so savagely. The end of the 116 year struggle between old foes shall be the making and breaking of a boy yet to develop into a man….

The Arrow of Sherwood by Lauren Johnson

Arrow of Sherwood by Lauren Johnson

My book review of Robin Hood tale, Arrow of Sherwood by Lauren Johnson.

BOOK REVIEW: The Tapestry by Nancy Bilyeau

The Tapestry by Nancy Bilyeau

Joanna Stafford, our intrepid ex-Dominican super sleuth is at it again. This time, she’s hurled straight into the midst of plotting and deception at Henry VIII’s court.

‘We Do Not Sow’: The Economics and Politics of A Song of Ice and Fire

A Song of Ice and Fire books - photo by Robert / Flickr

George R.R. Martin’s fantasy epic A Song of Ice and Fire brilliantly illustrates a number of basic principles of political economy.

What’s New in Medieval Historical Fiction

New Medieval Historical Fiction

Learn more about these books: See the Sister Fidelma mysteries Wikipedia entry Visit, website for the authors Kathleen O’Neal Gear and W. Michael Gear The Buried Giant review – Kazuo Ishiguro ventures into Tolkien territory – review by Tom Holland in The Guardian ‘The Invention of Fire’ is a thrillingly written 14th-century murder mystery […]

Reinventing the Hero: Gardner’s Grendel and the Shifting Face of Beowulf in Popular Culture

John Gardner Grendel

In twentieth- and twenty-first century Anglophone culture, the impact of Beowulfiana — what we call that amorphous mass of materials that have accumulated around the poem — has been widespread yet subtle.

Caliburn: Merlin’s Tale

Caliburn Merlin Tale

The best way to describe Virgil Renzulli’s Caliburn: Merlin’s Tale is as a King Arthur origin story, set in an alternate universe.

Review: The Holy Lance, by Andrew Latham

Latham Holy Lance

Inside, what I came across was a solid tale based during the Third Crusade, in the aftermath of the dreadful battle at the Horns of Hattin.

The Beginning of Medieval Historical Fiction: Ten Novels from the 19th century

Ivanhoe medieval historical fiction

Historical fiction was just beginning as literary genre in the 19th century, but soon authors found success in writing about stories set in the Middle Ages.

Historical Lives in Fiction, Characters in Fiction: Are they the same people?

Abelard and Heloise by Edmund Blair Leighton

There is a strong relationship between history and fiction. The characters created by writers, either in historical novels and literary fiction, reflect that relationship. Many of the characteristics of fictional characters can also be ascribed to characters depicted in historical fiction and biographical writing.

‘Pilgrimage’, pilgrimage, and writing historical fiction

Lucy Pick Pilgrimage

Dr. Pick discusses how she wrote and published a historical novel and the connection between academic writing and writing for a broader audience.

What’s New in Medieval Fiction

new medieval books

Here are seven recently published novels that will take you back to the Middle Ages!

Medieval Books for Christmas

The Middle Ages - Johannes Fried

It’s that time of year again – the mad scramble for the perfect Christmas gift for the historian, nerd, avid reader on your list. Here are a few suggestions for you – new releases for December and January!

‘There is more to the story than this, of course’: Character and Affect in Philippa Gregory’s The White Queen

The White Queen

Philippa Gregory has critiqued gendered representations of Elizabeth Woodville and has stated that her 2009 novel The White Queen fictionalises Woodville’s history with the aim of challenging such depictions.

INTERVIEW: A Conversation with SD Sykes about Plague Land

Burial of plague victims - The Black Death

My interview with fiction author, SD Sykes about her fantastic medieval crime novel, Plague Land.

CONFERENCE: The Historical Novel Society – London 2014

Historical Novel Society Conference - London, 2014

My review of the recent Historical Novel Society conference that took place in London, England.

BOOK REVIEW: Plague Land by SD Sykes

Plague Land by SD Sykes

My review of SD Sykes brilliant medieval thriller, Plague Land.

BOOK REVIEW: A Triple Knot by Emma Campion

A Triple Knot - Emma Campion

BOOK REVIEW: A Triple Knot by Emma Campion I had the pleasure of reading another Emma Campion (Candace Robb) novel recently. Campion, who has written extensively about Alice Perrers, the royal mistress of King Edward III, in her hit, The King’s Mistress, is back on the shelves with a new book released this month entitled: A Triple Knot. This […]

A Song of Fantasy Traditions: How A Song of Ice and Fire Subverts Traditions of Women in Tolkienesque Fantasy

Game of Thrones 3 - photo courtesy HBO Canada

I will show how Martin is working against the tradition of marginalized female characters in the fantasy genre.

Book Review: An Unsuitable Princess, by Jane Rosenberg LaForge

an unsuitable princess

The fantasy breaks up the troubling narcissism of the diary, while the diary gives the fantasy its grounding and meaning.

Staging Medievalisms: Touching the Middle Ages through Contemporary Performance


Examining the Middle Ages through modern eyes: movies, TV, stage, tourism and books. How do we perform the Middle Ages?

The history of foxglove poisoning, was Edward IV a victim?

king-edward IV

The history of foxglove poisoning, was Edward IV a victim? Peter Stride (University of Queensland School of Medicine, Australia) Fiona Winston-Brown (Librarian, Redcliffe Hospital, Australia) Richard III Society: Inc. Vol. 43 No. 1 March (2012) Abstract Edward IV, having been obese, but otherwise apparently in good health, died after an acute illness of only a […]

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