Eadgifu, Anglo-Saxon Queen

Anglo Saxon Lady (9th Century) - photo by Paul Walker / Flickr

What little historical records we have pertaining to Queen Eadgifu tell us she exercised considerable power.

Discovering Medieval Graffiti: An Interview with Matthew Champion

medieval graffiti book

We found demons, faces, hand outlines, names, dates and prayers – just about every type of graffiti you can imagine.

Imprisoning the Mentally Ill in Medieval England

imprisonment - Detail of a miniature of Bel Acueil in prison, being guarded by Vielle (old woman). British Library

What to do with mentally ill individuals who are violent? This is a question that modern and medieval societies had to deal with.

Pigs and Prostitutes: Streetwalking in Comparative Perspective

feeding pigs

‘No one shall keep pigs which go in the streets by day or night, nor shall any prostitute stay in the city.’

Pearl, translated by Sophie Jewett

Pearl

We are very proud to offer our first ebook: Pearl, translated by Sophie Jewett.

Julian of Norwich: Mystic, Theologian and Anchoress

Julian of Norwich

Very little is known of her actual life, not even her real name. We do know she wrote two texts in English on her visions and their meaning

Richard Duke of Gloucester as Lord Protector and High Constable of England

Richard Duke of Gloucester as Lord Protector and High Constable of England

During Richard’s protectorate he was responsible, as far as we know, for four executions for treason

Medieval Faces in Stone

Medieval Faces in Stone - images courtesy Norfolk Graffiti Project Survey

For centuries, medieval people were etching faces and human figures into the stone walls of their churches. Thanks to the work by the Norfolk Graffiti Project Survey these images are being seen again.

King Stephen’s Siege Tactics

Lincoln Castle - Photo by Gustavo Faraon / Flickr

I will describe Stephen’s siege tactics in three general areas: (1) indirect assault, (2) direct assault, and (3) non-weapon engineering.

Henry III and Magna Carta 1225

Henry III and Magna Carta 1225

Now at the end of 1215 you would have thought this charter was a failure, without a future. Why is that?

From Alfred to Harold II: The Military Failure of the Late Anglo-Saxon State

Death of Harold Godwinson in the Battle of Hastings

Most historians now acknowledge that Hastings was indeed a close-run affair, won more by luck and perhaps generalship than because of fundamental structural or tactical differences in the forces or disparities in their military technologies.

Remains of a Medieval Building Discovered in Lincoln

medieval wall lincoln - photo courtesy Lincolnshire County Council

Construction workers in the English city of Lincoln have discovered a medieval wall, which is believed to have been part of a 12th-century house or shop

Chronicles and Politics in the Reign of Edward II

Edward II - photo by Holly Hayes  / Flickr

Historians have tended to give more weight to sources such as governmental and legal records than to chronicles, not least because so many survive. They open up areas of history impossible to access through chronicles alone, and they also provide a much more precise and detailed political narrative.

A Face from Anglo-Saxon England

anglo saxon face - photo courtesy Lincolnshire County Council

The face of a man who lived nearly a thousand years ago in Anglo-Saxon England has been recreated by experts from the University of Dundee.

Fashion Old and New: Weaving and Tailoring in the Early Medieval and Early Modern Period

Anglo Saxon pin beater made of animal bone. Cheltenham, Gloucestershire, 400-800 AD. Courtesy of Cotswold Archaeology.

Fashion fan? Interested in medieval and early modern textiles? Then this was your session. 2 papers from opposite ends of the spectrum: Early Medieval weaving and Early Modern Tailoring.

Medieval poaching site discovered in England

medieval deer hunting scene - British Library Egerton 1146   f. 5v

Archaeologists working in northern England have uncovered a stone-lined cess pit that was filled with dozens of bones from deer. The evidence suggests that they were dumped here by poachers.

Owain’s Revolt? Glyn Dŵr’s role in the outbreak of the rebellion

Owain Glyn Dwr statue at Corwen-  photo by Lyn Dafis / Flickr

This article asserts that Owain Glyn Dŵr was neither the instigator nor, initially, the sole leader of the revolt for which he has become well known. It also challenges the idea that there was just one rebellion and casts doubt on the notion that he proclaimed himself Prince of Wales on 16 September 1400.

Dynastic Politics: Five Women of the Howard Family During the Reign of Henry VIII, 1509-1547

Portrait study of Mary, Duchess of Richmond and Somerset.

The Howards were the most important noble dynasty of Henry VIII’s reign. Tudor political history cannot be written without them; they lived their lives at its core, in the shadow of the Crown.

Conflicting Perspectives: Chivalry in Twelfth-Century Historiography

Bibliothèque nationale de France, Département des Manuscrits, Division occidentale, Français 226, fol. 256v, Bataille de Tinchebray (1106)

Historians have found the task of defining medieval chivalry to be an elusive task.

Margery Kempe and the People on the Periphery

The first page of the Book of Margery Kempe - British Library Add MS 61823

There are few medieval texts I find so entertaining as The Book of Margery Kempe, the fifteenth-century story of a seemingly ordinary woman of Bishops Lynn, England, whose life was transformed by visions of Jesus. T

Finding Truth in the Myth of Lady Godiva: Femininity, Sex, and Power in Twelfth Century England

Lady Godiva by John Collier, c. 1897

Although it is now widely accepted that Lady Godiva never mounted her horse ‘bareback,’ the infamous Domesday Book documented she was indeed a landowner in Coventry. In isolation, this tale is a pleasurable story of risk-taking.

Papers on Medieval Prosopography: Session #47 at KZOO 2015

Pieter Brueghel - Kermesse (The Feast of Saint George)

Three fantastic papers on Prosopography from #KZOO2015.

Cynethryth, Queen of the Mercians

Cynethryth Coin

Cynethryth and Offa were the ultimate power couple in eighth century England.

Ruralia Commoda – 14th century gardening manual on display in London

Ruralia commoda

Written in Latin between 1304 and 1309 by Petrus de Crescentiis, a wealthy lawyer from Bologna in Italy, Ruralia Commoda was the only publication of its kind during Henry VIII’s reign.

Women, the Marketplace, and the Borough Courts: Evidence from Fourteenth-Century Colchester

19th century image of Colchester

By examining the frequency and types of infractions for which women were cited at court and, additionally, the complaints women brought in the first half of the fourteenth century, this essay aims to explore the legal and cultural implications of women’s representation in the borough courts.

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