The Love of Books

Detail of a painting by Cima da Conegliano (1460–1518)

Books delight us, when prosperity smiles upon us; they comfort us inseparably when stormy fortune frowns on us.

Medieval Lisbon: Castelo de São Jorge

Walking along the castle walls, you can see the red and green flag of Portugal whipping in the wind alongside the black and white flag of the city. Photo by

Above Lisbon’s skyline of colourful tiled houses and red roofs lies Castelo de São Jorge, a dominating, but beautiful, 11th century fortress in the heart of this vibrant city…

Researching Architectural History Through Archaeology: The Case of Westminster Abbey

Warwick Rodwell

For half a millennium, scholars have researched and written about the history and architecture of Westminster Abbey, using documents and visual inspection. One might therefore assume that the architectural history of this iconic building is well understood, and in some respects it is.

Anne Boleyn’s Songbook

Anne Boleyn's Songbook - photo courtesy Heather Teysko

Now for the first time in 500 years much of the music included in Anne Boleyn’s songbook has been recorded by the Alamire Consort, under the direction of Dr. David Skinner of Sidney Sussex College, Cambridge University.

Hastings: An Unusual Battle


Part of the reason academic warriors have covered the ground so often is that the battle is by no means easy to understand. It was unusual in a number of ways; so unusual, that the battle demands special care in interpretation.

Trickery, Mockery and the Scottish Way of War

The earliest known depiction of the Battle of Bannockburn in 1314 from a 1440s manuscript of Walter Bower's Scotichronicon

This article seeks to examine two prominent themes, those of trickery and mockery, in how warfare against England was represented in Scottish historical narratives of the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries.

Who Were The Celts? The British Museum Offers Answers with New Exhibition

Gundestrup Cauldron Silver  Gundestrup, northern Denmark, 100 BC–AD 1 © The National Museum of Denmark. The British Museum. Photo by

The British Museum just opened its latest exhibit, Celts: Art and Identity this past Thursday, covering 2,500 years of Celtic history. The exhibit explores Celtic identity and how it eveolved from the time of the Ancient Greeks to the present through art, culture, daily life, religion and politics.

5 Cool Celtic Things at the British Museum

(L) Horned helmet. Bronze, glass, Found along the Thames river near Waterloo, London, England (200-100 BC). (R) Greek helmet, bronze. Olympia, South-Western Greece (460 BC), The British Museum.Photo by

I attended the opening of the British Museum’s, Celts: Art and Identity exhibit on Sept 24th. It showcases stunning art, jewellery, weaponry, daily and religious objects to tell the story of the Celtic people.

The Sense of Time in Anglo-Saxon England

Sundial at the Church of St John the Baptist, Pampisford, Cambridgeshire. Photo by Nige Brown / Flickr

Much has been written about how the Anglo- Saxons measured time, but relatively little about why, or in what circumstances. When did it seem important to note the year or the month, the day or the hour?

The Battle of Neville’s Cross as told in the Lanercost Chronicle

Battle of Neville's Cross from a 15th-century Froissart manuscript

The year 1346 is remembered in England mostly for the Battle of Crecy, where King Edward III defeated the French forces in one of the most important battles of the Hundred Years War. That year also saw another major battle, this one fought on English soil.

Ten Castles that Made Medieval Britain: Tintagel Castle

Tintagel Castle - photo by Ben Salter / Flickr

The bleached bones of a blasted cliff-top castle, scourged by leaping sea and howling wind, Tintagel made as much from tempered dreams as carved stone still has the power to inspire.

Using LEGO to show the history of medieval England

Medieval Lego

Learn more about the great new book Medieval Lego, by Greyson Beights

Recipes from The Tudor Kitchen

Recipes from The Tudor Kitchen

Get recipes on A Dysschefull of Snowe – Strawberries on Snow and Steamed Asparagus Spears in Orange Sauce

The Iconography of ‘Husband-beating’ on Late-Medieval English Misericords

Misericord, St Mary's church, Fairford
A woman beating a man, grabbing his hair.
15th C. possibly taken from Cirencester Abbey. Photo by Julian P Guffogg /

More misericords depicting husband-beating survive in England than in other European countries, and their artistic profusion is mirrored in the rich vernacular tradition for which violent wives proved a favoured subject.

The English way of war, 1360-1399

Anointing of Pope Gregory XI. Battle of Pontvallin (1370). Bibliotheque Nationale MS Fr. 2643

This thesis challenges the orthodox view that the years 1360 to 1399 witnessed a period of martial decline for the English.

Ten Castles that Made Medieval Britain: Warwick Castle

Warwick Castle from the outer court, painted by Canaletto in 1752

Raised amidst the settling dust of the Norman Conquest, the traditional seat of the Earldom of Warwick has continually throughout its millennia long and oft glorious history fundamentally reinvented itself, making it the Madonna of medieval military architecture.

Walking Tour of the Battle of Stamford Bridge

Battle of Stamford Bridge - Wilhelm Wetlesen: Illustration for Harald Hardraada saga, Heimskringla 1899-edition

The Stamford Bridge Battlefield Walk takes place on the 26th September at 10:30am, a day after the battle would have taken place in 1066, and starts at Shallows Car Park, Stamford Bridge.

A Medieval Weather Report

medieval weather - photo by AvidlyAbide / Flickr

What was England’s weather like 746 years ago?

Capital and Corporal Punishment in Anglo-Saxon England

Jay Paul Gates

Jay Gates, Nicole Marafioti and Valerie Allen speak about Capital and Corporal Punishment in Anglo-Saxon England

The earliest use of the F-word discovered

Cheshire County Court Rolls - TNA CHES 29/23 - photo by Paul Booth

An English historian has come across the word ‘fuck’ in a court case dating to year 1310, making it the earliest known reference to the swear word.

What do Cod Bones from the Mary Rose tell us about the global fish trade?

Atlantic cod

New stable isotope and ancient DNA analysis of the bones of stored cod provisions recovered from the wreck of the Tudor warship Mary Rose, which sank off the coast of southern England in 1545, has revealed that the fish in the ship’s stores had been caught in surprisingly distant waters

Ten Castles that Made Medieval Britain: Windsor Castle

Drawing of Windsor Castle from 1910

At one time the greatest palace complex in Europe and a favoured haunt of the British Royal family to this day, Windsor Castle is a still living relic of a time where out of necessity, the sum of a nation’s sovereignty and a State’s very existence as a politically distinct identity rested upon a crowned head.

Bucks County Museum looking to acquire Lenborough Coin Hoard

lenborough hoard - photo courtesy British Museum

Late last year, over 5200 silver coins was found by a metal detectorist in England. Now, the public will get a taste of this hoard, when 21 coins go on a special exhibit at at Bucks County Museum.

Demon Possession in Anglo‐Saxon and Early Modern England: Continuity and Evolution in Social Context

A miniature in the British Library Yates Thomson MS 26, with Saint Cuthbert's hand healing a paralytic

Sometime between around 687 and 700, a distraught father brought his raving son, in a wagon, to the island of Lindisfarne, where the holy relics of Saint Cuthbert were kept.

Ten Castles that Made Medieval Britain: Dunstanburgh Castle

Dunstanburgh Castle

Few ambitions were ever so grand or manifestos so proudly proclaimed as those writ into the walls of Dunstanburgh Castle. The power of such fortifications wasn’t just limited to their considerable heft but was rooted in their role as the stronghold and home of the great men and women of the age

medievalverse magazine