Book: Magna Carta: The Birth of Liberty - Dan Jones

Here are a few recent releases for medievalists hunting for Black Friday books and early Christmas gifts!

For the Knyʒhtys tabylle and for the Kyngges tabylle: An Edition of the Fifteenth-Century Middle English Cookery Recipes in London, British Library’s MS Sloane 442

Medieval Cooking - A cook at the stove with his trademark ladle; woodcut illustration from Kuchenmaistrey, the first printed cookbook in German, woodcut, 1485

The present thesis offers an edition of some fifteenth century Middle English cookery recipes, more specifically those of the Sloane 442 manuscript (MS Sloane 442), located at the British Library, London. The cookery recipes of this collection were most likely meant for the tables of the upper classes

I’ll Eat My Hat If It’s Richard: Dr. Turi King on the Impact of the Richard III Project

Dr. Turi King giving her talk on the discovery of Richard III at the 'Making the Medieval Relevant' conference

Turi King discusses some of the more humorous circumstances surrounding Richard III’s discovery, the science behind the dig, and the media onslaught that ensued.

England’s Immigrants 1330-1550: Resident Aliens in the Later Middle Ages

Bart Lambert

Paper by Bart Lambert given at Medieval and Early Modern Records Seminar held in Leeds, on August 2, 2014

John Hardyng and his Chronicle

John Hardyng Chronicle

Hardyng, an ex-soldier and spy of Henry V, set about composing the work after he ‘retired’ to the Augustinian priory at South Kyme, Lincolnshire, in the 1440s or 1450s.

‘Pirates, robbers and other malefactors’: The role played by violence at sea in relations between England and the Hanse towns, 1385 – 1420

The summary execution of Störtebeker, 1401; woodcut by Nicolaus Sauer from 1701

This thesis will argue that the impact of specific phenomena, particularly the activities of the Vitalienbrüder, on Anglo-Hanseatic relations has been not only neglected but misunderstood, and that attention to English sources can help flesh out our understanding of the Vitalienbrüder’s history.

National-Ethnic Narratives in Eleventh-Century Literary Representations of Cnut

Matthew Paris's (early 13th-century) impression of the Battle of Assandun, depicting Edmund Ironside (left) and Cnut (right)

This article takes literary representations of Cnut, the Danish conqueror of England, as a case study of the construction of English identity in the eleventh century.

Medieval Books: 5 Great New Releases!

Book - 24 Hours at Agincourt

Black Friday is around the corner – here are a few books that have just been released!

The most popular boys’ names in Tudor England

While the name Edward - including Edward VI (1537–1553) - was in the top 10, it was not in first place.

What were the most popular names for boys in England during the 16th century?

The most popular girls’ names in Tudor England

Portrait of Elizabeth Knollys, Lady Leighton (b. 15 June 1549, maid of honor early in the reign of Queen Elizabeth

What were the most popular names for girls in England during the 16th century?

The Quirky Questions of Wynkyn de Worde

Chicken or egg? Photo by Ruben Alexander / Flickr

From the ‘chicken or egg’ question to age of a mouse, some of the riddles from England’s oldest joke book.

The ‘Miracle of Childbirth’: The Portrayal of Parturient Women in Medieval Miracle Narratives

14th century birth scene, from British Library Royal 2 B VII   f. 48

This paper explores how tales of difficult births found in medieval miracle narratives can contribute to our understanding of the experience of pregnancy and childbirth in twelfth-century England.

Ring Out the Old: Medieval Bells in England

Rabbit tolling church bells from the medieval devotional Book of Hours

Of the bells that survive, the oldest may be in St. Chad’s Church in Claughton in Lancashire.

Technological Determinisms of Victory at the Battle of Agincourt

The Battle of Agincourt from Enguerrand de Monstrelet, Chronique de France. French. Manuscript op parchment, 266 ff., 405 x 300 mm. Brugge(?), c.1495

This article takes issue with the deterministic conclusions of a recent study by three scientists who investigated the effects of wearing armour on soldier exhaustion during the battle of Agincourt.

Agincourt 1415 – 2015

Agincourt 1415 - 2015 Anne Curry

Anne Curry talks about the myths and history of the Battle of Agincourt

Eleanor of Castile: The Shadow Queen, by Sara Cockerill

eleanor of castile

Eleanor was a highly dynamic, forceful personality whose interest in the arts, politics and religion were highly influential in her day – and whose temper had even bishops quaking in their shoes.

Monsters and the Exotic in Early Medieval England

Marvels of the East, opening, fol. 039v-040r, early twelfth century, Bodleian Library, University of Oxford

The dominant literate culture of early medieval England – male, European, and Christian – often represented itself through comparison to exotic beings and monsters, in traditions developed from native mythologies, and Classical and Biblical sources.

Celebrating Agincourt 600 at the Wallace Collection

Italian Gauntlets, 1390, inscribed wit hthe words, 'AMOR' (love). The Wallace Collection. Photo by

This week, historians around the world are gearing up to commemorate the 600th anniversary of the Battle of Agincourt, one of the most significant battles of the Hundred Year’s War.

Agincourt 1415: The Battle

Matthew Bennett agincourt

What you haven’t got is an ordered advance – you’ve got complete and total chaos.

Five Myths about the Battle of Agincourt

myths of the battle of agincourt

Anne Curry explains that ‘no other battle has generated so much interest or some much myth’ as the Battle of Agincourt, fought on October 25, 1415.

Tactics, Strategy, and Battlefield Formation during the Hundred Years War: The Role of the Longbow in the ‘Infantry Revolution’

Archers - British Library Royal 16 G VIII   f. 189

The English longbow had a tremendous impact on strategy and tactics during the Hundred Years War.

The King’s Welshmen: Welsh Involvement in the Expeditionary Army of 1415

Illustration of a Welsh archer from the late 13th century

This paper examines the evidence behind the claims that it was Welsh archers that won the battle of Agincourt for Henry V. As might be expected, it is a little less clear-cut than that.

John Gower’s Handwriting identified

British Library, Add. MS 59495, fol. 39v. - image from the International John Gower Society

John Gower, considered to be one of the greatest poets of medieval England, left behind several remarkable works. A scholar has now been able to identify poems that were written by his own hand, including a poignant piece about how he was going blind.

Understanding Torksey, Lincolnshire: A geoarchaeological and landscape approach to a Viking overwintering camp

Created by Robin Boulby / Wikimedia Commons

Viking overwintering camps of late 9th century England have been excluded from most recent dialogues regarding Viking Age England. Although overwintering camps are directly mentioned in historical records such as the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, these sites have remained archaeologically elusive.

Dreams and lovers: the sympathetic guide frame in Middle English courtly love poems

The Works of Geoffrey Chaucer, 1896

When is a dream not a dream? The Middle English convention of the ‘dream vision’ has been read by modern scholars as a genre that primarily reveals the medieval understanding of dreaming and dream theory, so that events and stories presented within a dream frame are necessarily read through that specific hermeneutic.

medievalverse magazine