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Eleanor of Aquitaine: A Queen and A Mother

The mere mention of Eleanor of Aquitaine brings to mind an remarkable woman in many respects.

Eleanor of Aquitaine: Not Your Average Medieval Woman

Eleanor of Aquitaine is one of the most well-known English queens of the Middle Ages.

Henry II and Arthurian Legend

For several decades now, a number of medievalists have directly linked this new fashion in Arthurian literature to the patronage of Henry II.

An actress’ approach to the role of Eleanor of Aquitaine in The Lion In Winter by James Goldman

The story of her struggle with her husband, Henry II, at the time of the death of their eldest son, Henry the Young King, in 1183, has been made into a play by James Goldman, called The Lion in Winter, which was produced successfully on Broadway in March, 1966.

BOOK REVIEW: A King’s Ransom – Sharon Kay Penman

A King’s Ransom is the follow up to Lionheart and tells the story of King Richard I’s imprisonment in Germany at the hands of Duke Leopold of Austria and Emperor Heinrich VI and of his battle to win back his Kingdom from his rapacious brother John.

Analyzing History: Bertran de Born – Innocent Poet or Inciter of Revolt

While words are powerful tools that can invoke emotions ranging from jubilation to revulsion, could they be the cause of a rebellion against Henry II of England by his children and wife, Eleanor of Aquitaine? Could the words of a mere troubadour drive the revolt of a family against their king?

Eleanor, Queen of France and England and Duchess of Aquitaine

There never has been another Queen like her.

Agatha, Clerical ‘Wife’ and Wet Nurse to King John of England, Longtime Companion to Godfrey de Lucy, Bishop of Winchester

Agatha’s life, like that of her mistress Eleanor of Aquitaine, is remarkable in an age when women’s innate inferiority and wives’ subordination to their husbands were almost universally accepted, and discussions of women and marriage in learned treatises, sermons, and vernacular stories were ‘at worst misogynistic and at best ambivalent.’

Queen’s Gold and Intercession: The Case of Eleanor of Aquitaine

This essay will consider basic questions about queen’s gold and intercession. First it will address the mechanics of the levy and collection of queen’s gold, beginning with fundamentals such as the nature of the levy and who paid. An investigation into the origins of queen’s gold will follow.

The Queen of troubadours goes to England: Eleanor of Aquitaine and 12th Century Anglo-Norman Literary Milieu

Although her importance in the growth of courtly love literature in France has been sufficiently stated, little attention has been paid to her patronising activities in England.

The Uncommon Commonality of Eleanor of Aquitaine

Eleanor lived at the junction of these two phenomena. She was raised on the foundation of a reforming western world that her people, aesthetically speaking, pioneered in many ways. The history of her, fact and fiction, result from that background.

Partners in Rule: A Study of Twelfth-Century Queens of England

The queens of twelfth-century England provide a prime example of how the queen was not, in fact, powerless in the rule of her realm, but rather a significant governmental official who had the opportunity to take a complementary part in royal rule that suited her strengths.

Robbing Churches and Pulling Beards: The Rebellious Sons of Henry II

The unruly sons of Henry II and Eleanor of Aquitaine: Henry the Young King, Richard I, Geoffrey of Brittany and King John, are fortunately well documented during their father’s lifetime.

Gerald of Wales and the Angevin Kings

Gerald of Wales and the Angevin Kings Steele, Helen Published Online (2006) Abstract On the 10th of November 1203, Silvester Giraldus Cambrensis attended a meeting at Westminster Abbey in London at which Hubert Walter, Archbishop of Canterbury, announced the selection of Geoffrey de Henelawe as Bishop of the See of St David’s. Although five years […]

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