Fast and Feast – Christianization through the Regulation of Everyday Life

Haakon Jarl (Haakon Sigurdsson) was given missionaries by the king of Denmark, but before departure, Haakon sent the missionaries back.

This article will illustrate that an important part of rulers’ wish to create a Christian society was the introduction of Christian legislation.

Europe and the beginning of Scottish sovereignty

Alexander III

Scotland’s story may have been distinctive, but its experience was not.

Objections to Episcopal Elections in England, 1216-1272

Canterbury Cathedral

Objections to Episcopal Elections in England, 1216-1272 Katherine Harvey Nottingham Medieval Studies: 55 (2011), pp. 125-48 Abstract In August 1228, following the death of Stephen Langton, the monks of Christ Church, Canterbury assembled to elect his successor. Their choice was quickly made: within a month of Langton’s death Walter of Eynsham, a member of the […]

Women’s Devotional Bequests of Textiles in the Late Medieval English Parish Church, c.1350-1550

Medieval woman reading

My investigation is set within the context of the current high level of interest in the workings of the late medieval parish.

Amending the Ascetic: Community and Character in the Old English Life of St. Mary of Egypt

Saint Mary of Egypt - British library

Among the most eligible saints for such treatment, Mary of Egypt deserves particular consideration: her popularity is evidenced by over a hundred extant Greek manuscripts of her Life and her uniquely prominent position in the Lenten liturgical cycle in the Eastern Church.

Redating the East-West Schism: An Examination of the Impact of the Sack of Constantinople in 1204

Conquest of Constantinople by the Crusaders in 1204

Although 1054 is indeed the date most often found on timelines and in textbooks—and therefore the date most often memorized by students of the medieval period—the majority of modern scholars recognize that the East-West Schism was in fact, as Timothy Ware writes, “something that came about gradually, as the result of a long and complicated process.”

The Myth of Pope Joan

Pope Joan

The legend of Pope Joan is a myth whose origins can be traced to papal politics in the thirteenth century.

Norse Influences in the Organisation of the Medieval Church in the Western Isles

Norse era construction - St. Magnus Church, Egilsay, Scotland

In its definitive form of a system of local churches serving identifiable districts, usually known as parishes, grouped together under a diocesan bishop, the medieval church cannot be said to have existed in the general area of Scotland until the twelfth century. At this time, and for some three centuries previously, the islands to the north and west, with parts of the adjacent mainland, were under Norse control.

Saints’ Cults in Medieval Livonia

Medieval Saints

Saints’ cults played a crucial role in medieval society. Although we know very little about the beliefs and rituals of the indigenous peoples of Livonia, either before or after the thirteenth-century conquest, we may assume that the process of Christianization must have caused major changes in their religious practices.

Pope vs State: The Medieval Catholic Church as an International Governmental Organization

Papacy

The object of this thesis is to understand the nature of these power struggles and to demonstrate that the medieval Church functioned in many ways like a prototype IGO.

Royal and Magnate Bastards in the Later Middle Ages: The View from Scotland

Medieval Children

Theory and Practice in Scotland and Elsewhere Medieval Scotland’s law on bastardy is set out in the lawbook Regiam Majestatem (c.1320)…In England things were different, as Michael Hicks has demonstrated. Admittedly, English heraldic practice eventually followed the French, and the formula ‘X bastard of Y’ is occasionally found for magnates’ bastards.

John of Gaunt and John Wyclif

John of Gaunt

Historians have always been somewhat puzzled at the alliance of two such men as John of Gaunt, duke of Lancaster and third son of Edward III, and John Wyclif, controversialist and reformer.

A Clergyman out of Control: Portray of a Bishop Around the Year 1000

medieval bishop

The following short article is about actions of bishops and their interpretation as they are illustrated in the genre Gesta episcoporum.

Medieval Religious, Religions, Religion

Jesus healing a leper

This article sketches the most important shift in medieval religious history over the past few decades: the transition from ‘church history’ to ‘the history of religious culture.’

What if Arianism had won?

What if Arianism had won

The fourth annual Princeton in Europe Lecture — Professor Diarmaid MacCulloch asks ‘What if Arianism had won?’

BOOKS: Canterbury Cathedral

Thomas Becket - Warrior, Priest, Rebel

After visiting Canterbury Cathedral, I was inspired to suggest books that relate to Canterbury’s famous Archbishops, history and beauty.

Community Conflict and Collective Memory in the Late Medieval Parish Church

Medieval parish

What role does conflict play in the formation of community identity? And how do powerful, even violent, moments sustain that identity throughout centuries of change and transformation?

Chronicles and historiography: the interrelationship of fact and fiction

Pope Clement V

This paper indicates some of the challenges posed by fourteenth-century chronicles while focusing on contemporary testimonies about Clement V, pope between 1305 and 1314.

How to Win Friends and Influence People: Medieval Bishops edition

medieval bishop

‘To be a bishop during this time was to be a leader who might crown kings or provoke a rebellion. So the question we’re asking is, if you wanted to become a bishop, who did you need to know?’

Monasticism and the Royal Abbey of Saint Denis

Saint Denis

Saint‐Denis 
seems 
to 
occupy 
a 
curious 
place 
in
 French
 history:
 never
 has 
there 
been
 a 
church 
so 
revered
 and 
yet
 so 
reviled.

The Spread Out of Arianism: A Critical Analysis of the Arian Heresy

Constantine and Arianism

On this paper I will focus on the Arian heresy, trying to show how this heresy spread out on the Roman Empire and how it kept his strength for many century on the spiritual formation of some people.

Unpleasant Affairs That Please Us: Admonition and Rebuke in the Letter Collections of the Archbishops of Canterbury, 11th and 12th Centuries

Archbishop of Canterbury -Thomas Becket

From the Norman Conquest in 1066 up to the famous “murder in the cathedral”2 in 1170, six archbishops of Canterbury ruled over the English church…

Badia Burning: The Spectacle of Violence in 14th-century Tuscany

The Cerchi seek vengeance - 1300 (Florence)

The theme of this paper is the use of ecclesiastical properties as sites of theatrical violence, and violence as a major element in the complex discourse between powerful rural lords and the Florentine commune.

Advocating change: monasteries, territories and justice between East and West Francia, 11th-12th centuries

Double monastery - England

This article looks at the question of the formation of territorial principalities in western Europe through the issue of ecclesiastical advocacy.

What if the Arians had won? A Reformation historian reconsiders the Medieval Western Church

What if the Arians had won

Diarmaid MacCulloch speculates on what Western Christianity would have been like in the perfectly plausible event of an Arian outcome to its emergence from the disappearance of the Western Roman Empire.

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