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Call for Papers: Power of the Bishop in Western Europe 1000-1300: Episcopal Personalities

Cardiff University is pleased to announce the up-coming symposium on the episcopal office in the Middle Ages, to be held 10-12 June 2015.

Top 10 Antipopes

A list of men who ultimately failed to become Pope.

King’s sister, queen of dissent: Marguerite of Navarre (1492-1549) and her evangelical network

This study reconstructs the previously unknown history of the most important dissident group within France before the French Reformed Church formed during the 1550s.

Bede’s Temple as History

Another IHR paper, this time, a talk given about Bede’s writing and his interest in the image of the Temple and its relation to Christianity. This paper also examined how Bede’s views shifted over time. How did Bede view Judaism? Was he truly ambivalent?

Instructions for a Parish Priest

Myrc was a clergyman writing in England in the early fifteenth century, and his long poem was created to help priests who were not particularly learned remember all the most important parts of their work.

10 Terrifying Reads for Halloween!

Here are some spooky medieval books for you to celebrate with over Halloween!

Does a Reformation End?: Rethinking Religious Simulation in Sixteenth-Century Italy

A paper examining the Italian Reformation.

The Episcopal Body and Sexuality in Late Medieval England

How was long-term celibacy thought to affect the health of religious men? How could medical knowledge help clerics to achieve bodily purity?

The Floating State: Trade Embargoes and the Rise of a New Venetian State

This paper was given by Georg Christ and examined embargoes and state formation in the late medieval and early modern period in Venice.

Latin Patrons, Greek Fathers: St Bartholomew of Simeri and Byzantine Monastic Reform in Norman Italy, 11th-12th Centuries

St Bartholomew of Simeri (ca. 1050-1130), a Greek monastic founder and reformer from Calabria, saw the effective end of Byzantine imperial power in southern Italy in 1071, the conquest of Muslim Palermo by Robert Guiscard the following year, and the rise of the Norman kingdom of Roger II at the end of his life.

Aberdeen Breviary goes online

A copy of the Aberdeen Breviary, one of the first printed books in Scotland, has been purchased by the National Library of Scotland and is now available to read online.

10 Things to See at Southwark Cathedral

My 10 favourite things about Southwark Cathedral.

Europe and the beginning of Scottish sovereignty

Scotland’s story may have been distinctive, but its experience was not.

Objections to Episcopal Elections in England, 1216-1272

Objections to Episcopal Elections in England, 1216-1272 Katherine Harvey Nottingham Medieval Studies: 55 (2011), pp. 125-48 Abstract In August 1228, following the death of Stephen Langton, the monks of Christ Church, Canterbury assembled to elect his successor. Their choice was quickly made: within a month of Langton’s death Walter of Eynsham, a member of the […]

Amending the Ascetic: Community and Character in the Old English Life of St. Mary of Egypt

Among the most eligible saints for such treatment, Mary of Egypt deserves particular consideration: her popularity is evidenced by over a hundred extant Greek manuscripts of her Life and her uniquely prominent position in the Lenten liturgical cycle in the Eastern Church.

Redating the East-West Schism: An Examination of the Impact of the Sack of Constantinople in 1204

Although 1054 is indeed the date most often found on timelines and in textbooks—and therefore the date most often memorized by students of the medieval period—the majority of modern scholars recognize that the East-West Schism was in fact, as Timothy Ware writes, “something that came about gradually, as the result of a long and complicated process.”

The Myth of Pope Joan

The legend of Pope Joan is a myth whose origins can be traced to papal politics in the thirteenth century.

Norse Influences in the Organisation of the Medieval Church in the Western Isles

In its definitive form of a system of local churches serving identifiable districts, usually known as parishes, grouped together under a diocesan bishop, the medieval church cannot be said to have existed in the general area of Scotland until the twelfth century. At this time, and for some three centuries previously, the islands to the north and west, with parts of the adjacent mainland, were under Norse control.

Pope vs State: The Medieval Catholic Church as an International Governmental Organization

The object of this thesis is to understand the nature of these power struggles and to demonstrate that the medieval Church functioned in many ways like a prototype IGO.

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