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Duns Scotus: A Brief Introduction to his Life and Thought

Duns Scotus, from his early years as a philosopher and theologian was confronted with this problem from within Aristotelian philosophy. And he gave a novel answer to it, one which differed from the Thomistic account.

Faith and reason: charting the medieval concept of the infinite

I would like to start with some assumptions. First, I take it for granted that the apposition of negative terms to the Almighty God became quite early an accepted practice in Christianity, which caused in turn that the infinite, as an opposite term to something easily convenient to positive delineation, was admitted in the repertoire of God’s adverbial description.

Duns Scotus on Divine Substance and the Trinity

Duns Scotus on Divine Substance and the Trinity Cross, Richard (Oriel College, Oxford) Medieval Philosophy and Theology 11 (2003) Abstract Charting a course between modalism (the belief that there is just one divine person) and tritheism (the belief that there are three divine substances or Gods) has long been the major problem for Trinitarian theology. […]

Divisibility, Communicability, and Predicability in Duns Scotus’s Theories of the Common Nature

Divisibility, Communicability, and Predicability in Duns Scotus’s Theories of the Common Nature Cross, Richard (Oriel College Oxford University) Medieval Philosophy and Theology 11 (2003) Abstract As is well-known, Duns Scotus adopts a moderately realist stance on the being of the common natures of categorial entities—substances and accidents. He believes that such natures have extramental being, […]

Letting Scotus Speak for Himself

Letting Scotus Speak for Himself Ingham, Mary Beth (Loyola Marymount University) Medieval Philosophy and Theology 10 (2001) Abstract In “The Unmitigated Scotus,” Thomas Williams calls for another, better reading of the Subtle Doctor: one in which he is able to “speak for himself.” In this and other articles, Williams criticizes recent Scotist scholarship for its […]

Happiness and Freedom in Aquinas’s Theory of Action

Happiness and Freedom in Aquinas’s Theory of Action McCluskey, Colleen (Saint Louis University) Medieval Philosophy and Theology 9 (2000) Abstract Thomas Aquinas is commonly thought to hold that human beings will happiness and do so necessarily. This is taken to mean first that human beings are not able to will misery for the sake of […]

Scotus on Morality and Nature

Scotus on Morality and Nature Hare, John (Calvin College) Medieval Philosophy and Theology 9 (2000) Abstract I. THE AFFECTION FOR JUSTICE AND THE AFFECTION FOR ADVANTAGE This article is part of a larger project defending a version of divine command theory in ethics. What I am interested in from Scotus is that he combines such […]

Species, Concept, and Thing: Theories of Signification in the Second Half of the Thirteenth Century

Species, Concept, and Thing: Theories of Signification in the Second Half of the Thirteenth Century Pini, Giorgio (Scuola Normale Superiore, Pisa) Medieval Philosophy and Theology 8 (1999) Abstract Students of later medieval semantics are familiar with the controversy that developed at the end of the thirteenth century over the signification of names. The debate focused […]

Did Scotus Embrace Anselm’s Notion of Freedom?

Did Scotus Embrace Anselm’s Notion of Freedom? Langston, Douglas Medieval Philosophy and Theology, vol. 5, no. 2 (1996) Abstract In his “Duns Scotus and the Experience of Human Freedom,” Joseph Incandela outlines three contemporary interpretations of Duns Scotus’s understanding of freedom. Much of the article is devoted to explaining William Frank’s view that Scotus embraces […]

Duns Scotus on Signification

Duns Scotus on Signification Perler, Dominik Medieval Philosophy and Theology, vol. 3 (1993) Abstract In both versions of his Commentary on the Sentences, Scotus alludes to a great controversy among his contemporaries over the question of whether a spoken word signifies a thing or a concept. He does not give a detailed account of this […]

Duns Scotus on Autonomous Freedom and Divine Co-Causality

Duns Scotus on Autonomous Freedom and Divine Co-Causality Frank, William A. Medieval Philosophy and Theology, vol. 2 (1992) Abstract John Duns Scotus teaches that God is an immediate, efficient cause of created volitions. He comes to this conclusion as an outcome of his logically prior commitments to the absolute contingency of God’s relationship to the […]

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