Remembrance of things past: recreating the lost world of medieval pilgrimage to St Thomas Becket in Canterbury

This paper discusses the Centre for the Study of Christianity & Culture’s recently completed a three-year AHRC funded research project, ‘Pilgrimage and England’s Cathedrals, past and present’.

Canterbury Cathedral by the Numbers

From 1 to 1,001,266, the story of the Canterbury Cathedral.

The pre-Conquest charters of Christ Church, Canterbury

This thesis comprises a study of all the records of the archbishop and chapter of Canterbury that purport to belong to the period before the Norman Conquest.

Original Magna Carta copy belonged to Canterbury Cathedral, historian finds

There are only four surviving copies of the original Magna Carta from 1215. One these originals has now been identified as first belonging to Canterbury Cathedral.

Medieval Manuscripts: The Great Canterbury Psalter

One manuscript, created in two countries by two different workshops, over a hundred years apart.

Guilt and Creativity in the Works of Geoffrey Chaucer

I argue that as Chaucer develops his own expansive, questioning poetics in The House of Fame and The Canterbury Tales, he problematises the principle of allegory on which the legitimacy of literary discourse was primarily based in medieval culture and the final fragments of The Canterbury Tales see Chaucer struggling, increasingly, to reconcile the boldness and independence of his poetic vision with the demands of his faith.

Objections to Episcopal Elections in England, 1216-1272

Objections to Episcopal Elections in England, 1216-1272 Katherine Harvey Nottingham Medieval Studies: 55 (2011), pp. 125-48 Abstract In August 1228, following the death of Stephen Langton, the monks of Christ Church, Canterbury assembled to elect his successor. Their choice was quickly made: within a month of Langton’s death Walter of Eynsham, a member of the […]

THINGS TO SEE: Murder in the Cathedral

This is my review of the T.S. Eliot’s play, “Murder in the Cathedral”, on at St. Bartholomew in Smithfield, London.

BOOKS: Canterbury Cathedral

After visiting Canterbury Cathedral, I was inspired to suggest books that relate to Canterbury’s famous Archbishops, history and beauty.

Saint Patrick’s Purgatory: a fresco in Todi, Italy

This essay deals with the tradition of the revelation of Purgatory to St. Patrick on Station Island in Lough Derg, whose popularity is testified not only in literary texts in the various languages of Medieval Europe but also in a unique work of art in the convent of the Sisters of Saint Clair at Todi, Umbria

medievalverse magazine