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A Will of their Own? Children’s Agency and Child Labour in Byzantium

This paper examines the relation between three concepts: a child’s will, children’s agency and child labour. This paper shows how these concepts were developed in Byzantine society in order to advance a religious agenda.

The Inverse Perspective in Byzantine Painting

The inverse perspective is a method of representing spatial depth used only in Byzantine painting. It is different from Renaissance perspective. The inverse perspective, with two-dimensional axonometric representations, is more complex, offering multiple possibilities of symbolization.

Venice’s Need for Settling the ‘Byzantine question’ by Conquest: The Fourth Crusade’s Second Siege of Constantinople (early 1204)

This article is a contribution to the ‘diversion debate’ concerning the Fourth Crusade (1202-1204), which argues that ultimately the endangered Venetian commercial interests were at the core of the final decision by the crusade leadership to conquer and take over the Byzantine empire.

Multilingualism and Empires: Byzantium and Sasanian Persia

The long and bitter confrontation between Byzantium and the Sasanian Empire was one of the most important historical phenomena of Late Antiquity; it was also very significant for the development of later mediaeval societies and institutions in East and West.

The Arabic Letters of the Byzantine Emperor Leo III to the Caliph ‘Umar Ibn ‘Abd al-‘Aziz: An Edition, Translation and Commentary

This study explores the tradition of the epistolary exchange between the two famous figures, the Byzantine emperor Leo III and the ‘Umayyad caliph, ‘Umar ibn ‘Abd al-‘Azīz.

Marrying the Mongol Khans: Byzantine Imperial Women and the Diplomacy of Religious Conversion in the 13th and 14th Centuries

Marrying the Mongol Khans: Byzantine Imperial Women and the Diplomacy of Religious Conversion in the 13th and 14th Centuries By AnnaLinden Weller Scandanavian Journal of Byzantine and Modern Greek Studies, Volume 2 (2016) Concerning this matter also a dread and authentic charge and ordinance of the great and holy Constantine is engraved upon the sacred table […]

The Social Scope of Roman Identity in Byzantium: An Evidence-Based Approach

This contribution concerns a specific point that no one has so far elucidated fully with reference to the evidence found in the sources: What was the social scope of attributions of Roman identity in Byzantine sources?

On the Mutilation and Blinding of Byzantine Emperors from the Reign of Heraclius I until the Fall of Constantinople

The article takes a diachronic approach to the questions regarding Byzantine emperors and pretenders who were blinded or mutilated.

Why was it important for the Byzantines to read Latin? The views of Demetrios Kydones (1324-1398)

This article will discuss how Demetrius Kydones promoted the policy of reconciliation and alliance with Western European powers against the Ottoman Turks. 

Breaking Down Barriers: Eunuchs in Italy and North Africa, 400-625

This paper considers how attitudes towards to imperial eunuchs as military leaders changed in parallel in both Greek and Latin texts from the 4th to 7th centuries, and the key role played by Justinian’s eunuch generals Solomon and Narses.

‘Greek fire’ revisited: current and recent research

The first point to make is that it seems now widely agreed that liquid fire was, in fact, a petroleum-based weapon, and had no connection whatsoever with explosive materials or mixtures,

New Medieval Books: Byzantium and the Islamic World

Five recent books that looks at the first centuries of contact and conflict between the Byzantine Empire and the Islamic world.

Sport During the Byzantine Era

It is without question that chariot racing was the most celebrated sport event of the Byzantine era.

Christ as Priest in Byzantine church decoration of the 11th and 12th centuries

The 11th century was a watershed in the Byzantine church decoration.

How to Murder a Byzantine Emperor

Three tales of murder from the Byzantine court.

Justinian and the Senate of Rome under Ostrogothic Rule

Although this law deals with a dry, technical matter, interesting only to the students of Roman civil law, especially testamentary law, it is also quite interesting for the study of the law making procedure in the time of Justinian.

Infantry versus Cavalry: The Byzantine Response

The Byzantines encountered many different nations on the battlefield during their long history.

Past and Present in Mid-Byzantine Chronicles: Change in Narrative Technique and the Transmission of Knowledge

Particular emphasis will be placed on the Chronicle of Theophanes the Confessor and the Chronicle of Symeon the Logothete.

The Historiography of Crisis: Jordanes, Cassiodorus and Justinian in mid sixth-century Constantinople

This article presents a new interpretation of the historiographical production of Jordanes by situating it in the political and social environment of Constantinople of the years 550-552.

The Soldier’s Life: Early Byzantine Masculinity and the Manliness of War

The Soldier’s Life: Early Byzantine Masculinity and the Manliness of War By Michael Stewart Byzantina Σymmeikta, Vol. 26 (2016) Introduction: The ancient Romans admired the characteristics that they believed allowed them to establish hegemony over their rivals. It comes as little surprise then that the hyper-masculine qualities of the Roman soldier became the standard by which […]

13th century skeleton discovered with oldest known form of maternal infection

By Michelle Donovan The 800-year-old skeleton of a young woman buried in a graveyard on the outskirts of the fabled city of Troy is yielding new insights into the evolution of bacterial infections and maternal health. Researchers at the University of McMaster’s Ancient DNA Centre and the University of Wisconsin-Madison have sequenced the complete genomes […]

An Uneasy Relation: Byzantium and the Nomads

Byzantine sources provide abundant information about how the imperial government in Constantinople dealt with the peoples inhabiting the steppe lands north of the Black and Caspian Seas.

A Collapse of the Eastern Mediterranean? New results and theories on the interplay between climate and societies in Byzantium and the Near East, ca. 1000–1200 AD

The reflection about the impact of climate on human society goes back to antiquity. It has gained renewed intensity with the discussion about climate change and its possible anthropogenic causes in the last decades.

Mob Politics: The Political Influence of the Circus Factions in the Eastern Empire from the Reign of Leo I to Heraclius (457-641)

This thesis explores the political motivations behind the factions’ violent behaviour, the evidence for their involvement in the military, and their role in accession ceremonies.

The Western presence in the Byzantine Empire during the reigns of Alexios I and John II Komnenos (1081-1143)

Contacts between Byzantium and the West increased during this period, which witnessed significant events like the First Crusade and the expansion of the Italian trading communities.

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