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“A Swarm in July”: Beekeeping Perspectives on the Old English Wið Ymbe Charm

At the same time, however, their differing responses to the remedy attest both to the variation of beekeeping practices and the multivalence of Wið Ymbe itself. The fact that two beekeepers interviewed within two days and two hundred miles of each other can respond differently to the charm’s advice on swarms suggests that we reevaluate unilateral assertions regarding what the text might have meant across the hundreds of years that we now know as the Anglo-Saxon period.

Reading Bede as Bede would read

Early medieval readers read texts differently than their modern scholarly counterparts.

Classical and Secular Learning among the Irish before the Carolingian Renaissance

Classical and secular learn­ ing maintained their close association with each other until the end of antiquity, when they gradually became divorced.

The Myth of the Anglo-Saxon Oral Poet

There are at least two reasons why the search for the Anglo-Saxon oral poet is worth reopening. To begin with, current thinking about oral poetry and poetics in the Anglo-Saxon period has been indelibly stamped by the classic Parry/Lord thesis, well known in its evolution from the 1950s to more recent years,

Consorting with the other: Re-constructing scholastic, rhetorical and literary attitudes to pagans and paganism in the Middle Ages

My thesis suggests that Christian culture in the late antique to medieval period consciously adapted pagan cultures for its own ends, with a particular view to the usefulness of pagan cultures.

Early medieval science: the evidence of Bede

The Venerable Bede used observable proofs and mathematical calculations in his early 8th-century treatise De temporum ratione to teach the astronomical principles that inform the calculation of the date of Easter. This suggests that the seeds of the modern scientific method might be found before the 12th century in the educational practices of the early medieval monasteries.

Theological Works of the Venerable Bede and their Literary and Manuscript Presentation, with Special Reference to the Gospel Homilies

Bede’s theology is complex and closely interwoven; as we can observe, the different themes are interleaved within the homilies. Though Bede was profoundly influenced by Gregory, Augustine and the other Church Fathers, he combined their theologies in a new way that has had a lasting influence.

Miracles of healing in Anglo-Celtic Northumbria as recorded by the venerable Bede and his contemporaries: a reappraisal in the light of twentieth century experience

Miracles of healing in Anglo-Celtic Northumbria as recorded by the venerable Bede and his contemporaries: a reappraisal in the light of twentieth century experience By Rex Gardner British Medical Journal, Vol.283 (1983) Introduction: The vigorous hybrid culture of Briton and Angle’ blossomed in the seventh century into the amazing Northumbrian golden age whose artefacts still […]

Alfred’s Historia Ecclesiastica

Alfred’s Historia Ecclesiastica Uijttewaal, B.T. B.A. Thesis, Universiteit Utrecht (2011) Abstract The “Eng­lish” had been punished by God through the arrival of the Vikings. The British before them, had lapsed in their faith and been sent the scourge of the Anglo-Saxons. This was the message of king Alfred at the end of the 9th century […]

The Place of Metrics in Anglo-Saxon Latin Education: Aldhelm and Bede

The Place of Metrics in Anglo-Saxon Latin Education: Aldhelm and Bede Ruff, Carin (John Carroll University) Journal of English and Germanic Philology, Vol. 104:2 (2005) Abstract The Anglo-Saxons are well known for having been pioneers in teaching Latin as a foreign language and in developing materials for elementary Latin instruction to supplement the grammars they […]

A study of Bede’s Historiae

This thesis examines the historia works of Bede in the light of the influence of genre and rhetoric on the construction of their narratives.

Household Men, Mercenaries and Vikings in Anglo-Saxon England

Mercenary soldiers played a crucial role in both the birth and death of Anglo-Saxon England.

Anglo Saxon Music: 500-1066

Anglo Saxon Music: 500-1066 By Jessica Lovett Published Online (2000) Introduction: Unlike its current trivial place in today’s society, in the early middle ages music was a valued part of the four sciences, or quadrivium. The potential effects of this science were both useful and dangerous. While no anglo-saxon treatise surv ives pertaining to music, […]

Contextualizing Bede’s Ecclesiastical History of the English People with Bioarchaeological Data – Reassessing Anglo-Saxon Culture, Health, and Disease

Contextualizing Bede’s Ecclesiastical History of the English People with Bioarchaeological Data – Reassessing Anglo-Saxon Culture, Health, and Disease By Joseph Z. Boyer The School of Historical Studies Postgraduate Forum E-Journal Edition, Vol. 7 (2009) Abstract: Both the limitations of paleopathological data and the lack of textual remains from early Anglo-Saxon Britain create difficulties when trying to interpret culture, […]

Monasticism in Anglo-Saxon England: An Analysis of Selected Hagiography from Northumbria Written in the Years after the Council of Whitby

Monasticism in Anglo-Saxon England: An Analysis of Selected Hagiography from Northumbria Written in the Years after the Council of Whitby By Carrie Couvillon Master’s Thesis, Louisiana State University, 2005 Abstract: Hagiography, writings about saints, was generally a means of venerating a saint’s life. An author of hagiography wrote to advance his own salvation as well […]

The Anglo-Saxon Cross at St. Andrew, Auckland: ‘Living Stones’

The Anglo-Saxon Cross at St. Andrew, Auckland: ‘Living Stones’ Maleczek, Nina York Medieval Yearbook, ISSUE No. 2, (2003) Abstract The remains of the High Cross at Auckland St. Andrews are well-known, but little documented. Rosemary Cramp describes and dates the cross (to between the end of the eighth-century and the beginning of the ninth), and […]

The Saintly Female Body and the Landscape of Foundation in Anglo-Saxon Barking

The Saintly Female Body and the Landscape of Foundation in Anglo-Saxon Barking By Lisa M.C. Weston Medieval Feminist Forum, Vol. 43 (2007) Introduction: Toward the end of the seventh century an Anglo-Saxon noblewoman named Ethelburga became the first abbess of a new monastery. Her foundation of what would become known as Barking Abbey – and […]

Seventh-Century Ireland as a Study Abroad Destination

Did you know that the Emerald Isle attracted swarms of eager foreign students, principally from England, to its monastic schools as early as the seventh century?

The Late Birth of a Flat Earth

In his chronologies, Bede sought to order the events of Christian history, but the primary motive and purpose of his calculations centered on a different, and persistently vexatious, problem in ecclesiastical timing—the reckoning of Easter.

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