What’s New for History Lovers at the Getty


Danielle Trynoski takes a look at two new exhibitions at the Getty Centre – Eat, Drink, and Be Merry and The Edible Monument – with curators Christine Sciacca and Marcia Reed

Gargoyles: Mysterious Monsters of the Middle Ages

Gargoyle - photo by Aitor Aguirregabiria / Flickr

I love gargoyles. While there are so many beautiful pieces of sculpture that have survived the Middle Ages, like so many people, I’m drawn to those strange and ugly funny faces, not least of all because I can’t figure out what they’re for.

A Needle’s Breadth Apart: The Unexplored Relationship Between Medieval Embroidery and Manuscript Illumination

Luttrell Psalter - British Library Add MS 42130

I am currently exploring records showing that there is evidence that some individuals were involved in both. In particular, mention of two nuns who were known as embroiderers and illuminators.

Beautiful 15th century sculpture now on display at the Getty Museum

Saint Philip by the Master of the Rimini Altarpiece - photo courtesy The Getty Museum

The Getty Museum is now showing its latest acquisition – a rare medieval alabaster sculpture of Saint Philip by the Master of the Rimini Altarpiece.

Who Were The Celts? The British Museum Offers Answers with New Exhibition

Gundestrup Cauldron Silver  Gundestrup, northern Denmark, 100 BC–AD 1 © The National Museum of Denmark. The British Museum. Photo by Medievalists.net

The British Museum just opened its latest exhibit, Celts: Art and Identity this past Thursday, covering 2,500 years of Celtic history. The exhibit explores Celtic identity and how it eveolved from the time of the Ancient Greeks to the present through art, culture, daily life, religion and politics.

How to Make Ink in the Middle Ages

Donatus writing his grammar, his ink-pot held by a monk labelled 'Heinre' - from British Library Arundel 43   f. 80v

Creating everyday objects in the Middle Ages often took a lot time and effort. If you needed ink, for example, and had to make it yourself, it could be several weeks before you could dip your quill into the inkwell.

The Iconography of ‘Husband-beating’ on Late-Medieval English Misericords

Misericord, St Mary's church, Fairford
A woman beating a man, grabbing his hair.
15th C. possibly taken from Cirencester Abbey. Photo by Julian P Guffogg / Geograph.org.uk

More misericords depicting husband-beating survive in England than in other European countries, and their artistic profusion is mirrored in the rich vernacular tradition for which violent wives proved a favoured subject.

Localizing the Holy Land: The Visual Culture of Crusade in England, circa 1140-1307

Holy Sepulchre Chapel, Winchester Cathedral  - photo by Christophe.Finot / Wikicommons Media

Analyzing diverse visual material, from images of the military orders on seals, and monastic maps of Palestine in manuscripts, to royal chambers with paintings of holy warfare and the display of Holy Land relics at court, my project juxtaposes sacred and secular commissions made for crusaders and affiliates of chivalric culture.

Laser scanning and 3D Printing used to recreate Michelangelo’s bronzes

Statue scan by WMG/University of Warwick

A team of researchers have been working together to try to understand how the two mysterious Renaissance bronzes were made and why they look the way they do by making accurate replicas of the originals.

‘The Mystic Hunt of the Unicorn’ tapestries unveiled at Stirling Castle

The Mystic Hunt of the Unicorn

A 14 year project to recreate the lost tapestries of James V has been completed at Stirling Castle.

Medieval Faces in Stone

Medieval Faces in Stone - images courtesy Norfolk Graffiti Project Survey

For centuries, medieval people were etching faces and human figures into the stone walls of their churches. Thanks to the work by the Norfolk Graffiti Project Survey these images are being seen again.

Angels in Art: Angels Through the Ages

Quinten Massys - The Virgin and Child Enthroned with Four Angels (1506-1509)

A look at cool and fun facts about angels and how they were depicted in some of the most beautiful works of Medieval and Renaissance art.

Foundation Myths in Medieval and Renaissance Italy

Plaque of Regola, the VII rione of Rome. (Dailyphotostream.blogspot.com)

The 3 papers featured here looked at the development of the civic identities of Florence, Genoa and Rome through art, architecture and foundation legends.

Late Medieval Enclosed Gardens of the Low Countries

Late Medieval Enclosed Gardens of the Low Countries

In the late Middle Ages and Early Modernity an artistic phenomenon emerged in a feminine religious context, particularly in the Low Countries and the Rhineland: the so-called Enclosed Gardens.

Drawings of Leonardo da Vinci to tour British Isles in 2016

The head of St Anne  - Leonardo da Vinci

Throughout 2016, ten of the finest drawings by Leonardo da Vinci in the Royal Collection will travel to four museums and galleries across the United Kingdom and Ireland in a new exhibition.

Ibn Al-Haytham’s Contributions to Optics and Renaissance Art

Charles Falco

I am going to talk about the science of optics, the history of western art, and the influence of Ibn Al-Haytham.

Medieval Self-Portraits

medieval self-portraits

We take a look at ten self-portraits from the Middle Ages.

New Richard III Art Exhibit Opens Today

This painting entitled Sanctuary for a King, the first in the series, will be sold by silent auction with proceeds from the sale being donated to Leicester Cathedral.

Renowned Leicester artist exhibit of the reinterment of Richard III at Leicester Cathedral opens today

Renaissance Splendors in L.A.

Renaissance Splendors of the Northern Italian Courts - photo by Danielle Trynoski

Danielle Trynoski takes in the new Renaissance Splendors of the Northern Italian Courts exhibit at the Getty Center in Lost Angeles

10 Cool Facts about Saint Catherine

Caravaggio (1598) - Saint Catherine of Alexandria

Saint Catherine of Alexandria and her wheel have been well recognized symbols since the beginning of the Middle Ages. Here are 10 interesting tidbits about Saint Catherine:

Do You Know Your Renaissance History?

sistine madonna

The Renaissance was an important era in the world. Do you know the famous Renaissance paintings, artists, and creations?

The Great Hours of Anne of Brittany

Great Hours of Anne of Brittany

The Great Hours of Anne of Brittany, created between 1503 and 1508 in Tours, France, is undoubtedly a masterpiece of French painting.

Books of Art: 20 Medieval and Renaissance Women Reading

Saints Christina and Ottilia by Lucas Cranach the Elder (1506)

I love to read. I also love books depicted in art. I became fascinated with Medieval and Renaissance pictures of women reading or with books. I noticed while I was walking around the National Gallery, Musèe Cluny and the Louvre recently that there are many beautiful images of women reading or with books. Saints, sinners, and laywomen; I wanted to share a few of my favourites. Here are 20 works of art of women and their books

The Crucifixion of Jesus in Medieval Art

Crucifixion of Jesus in Medieval Art

Take a look at these fifteenth examples of how the Crucifixion of Jesus was depicted by medieval artists between the 3rd and 15th centuries.

Byzantine influences on Western aristocratic illuminated manuscripts

fecamp psalter

The main subject of this study is an outstanding twelfth-century psalter produced in Normandy which has clear Eastern influences, both in terms of technical conception and iconography.

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