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The Global Side of Medieval at the Getty Centre: Traversing the Globe Through Illuminated Manuscripts

Los Angeles correspondent, Danielle Trynoski takes through the, ‘Traversing the Globe Through Illuminated Manuscripts’ exhibut at the Getty Museum.

Unexpected Evidence concerning Gold Mining in Early Byzantium

One of the consequences of the decline of Roman imperial might was the shortage of slaves at state-run mines. Consequently, criminals were often sentenced to damnatio ad metallum. The need for gold especially soared when the gold solidus was introduced at the beginning of the fourth century.

Christianity and the Latin tradition in early Medieval Ireland

The Christianity which arrived in Ireland with the fifth-century missionaries was more than just a literate religion; it was very much a religion of the book.

Amending the Ascetic: Community and Character in the Old English Life of St. Mary of Egypt

Among the most eligible saints for such treatment, Mary of Egypt deserves particular consideration: her popularity is evidenced by over a hundred extant Greek manuscripts of her Life and her uniquely prominent position in the Lenten liturgical cycle in the Eastern Church.

Women, War, and Social Change in Armenia during the Mongol Domination

The Mongol conquest of Armenia precipitated social changes that were in motion since the late 10th-early 11th centuries, such as the dissolution of some princely houses, the realignment of others, as well as the rise of new ones.

Conservation at Ani Cathedral and the Church of the Holy Savior

Ani, a dramatic, windswept archaeological site in eastern Turkey, was once a thriving medieval city on the trade route through Central Asia.

The Indigenous Christians of the Arabic Middle East in an Age of Crusaders, Mongols, and Mamlūks (1244-1366)

The chronological period of study is highlighted by the usurpation of the Ayyūbid-ruled Sultanate by the Baḥrī Mamlūks, while the two most important political-military events in the region were the collapse of the Crusader States and the invasion of the Mongols. This thesis will examine how events impacted on the nine Christian Confessions, treating each separately.

Caucasia and the First Byzantine Commonwealth: Christianization in the Context of Regional Coherence

Since at least the Iron Age, and perhaps much earlier, Caucasia has been a cohesive yet diverse zone of cross-cultural encounter and shared historical experience. Despite their linkage by a web of interconnections which was as dense as it was durable, the peoples inhabiting the isthmus between the Black and Caspian Seas have seldom exhibited a conscious regional identity in their oral, written, and visual monuments.

Perspectives on the Crusaders’ Armenia: Cilicia from 1071 to 1148

The vast majority of medieval historians writing on the Middle East have focused on Byzantium, the Crusaders, and the Saracens, but there is an abundance of primary materials on Armenian history

The Assassination of King Het‘um II: The Conversion of The Ilkhans and the Armenians

The Assassination of King Het‘um II: The Conversion of The Ilkhans and the Armenians By Angus Stewart Journal of the Royal Asiatic Society, Series 3, Vol.15 :1 (2005) Introduction: On November 17, 1307, the Armenian king, Het‘um II, was assassinated by a Mongol, recently converted to Islam, the noyan Bularghu. In this paper I will […]

The role of castles in the political and military history of the Crusader States and the Levant 1187 to 1380

This thesis deals with the various functions of Latin and Armenian fortifications in Cilician Armenia, Greece, Cyprus, Syria and Palestine between 1187 and c.1380.

The Crusaders through Armenian Eyes

How were the Crusades fitted into an Armenian worldview?

The Sign of Christ, the Sign of Salvation: an Exalted Cross in a Late Medieval Armenian Gospel Book

The Sign of Christ, the Sign of Salvation: an Exalted Cross in a Late Medieval Armenian Gospel Book By Orsolya Mednyánszky Paper given at the Vagantes: Medieval Graduate Student Conference, held at the University of Pittsburgh (2011) By the later Middle Ages, illuminated gospels became very popular among Armenians, with even lower class families owning […]

Armenia from the Fall of the Cilician Kingdom (1375) to the Forced Emigration under Shah Abbas (1604)

Armenia from the Fall of the Cilician Kingdom (1375) to the Forced Emigration under Shah Abbas (1604) By Dickran Kouymjian The Armenian People from Ancient to Modern Times, Vol.2, editor Richard Hovannisian, editor (New York, 1997) Introduction: The fifteenth and sixteenth centuries are the dark ages of Armenian history. The poverty of historical sources reflects the […]

The Armenian and Byzantine Foundations of the Concept of Jihad

What those ideas were I shall endeavor to make clear by first translating and then commenting on the passage in question. After that I propose to draw the reader’s attention to certain broad but significant similarities between these ideas and the concept of Jihad as initially expressed and enunciated in the pages of the Qur’an.

The Turco-Mongol Invasions and the Lords of Armenia in the 13-14th Centuries

The Turco-Mongol Invasions and the Lords of Armenia in the 13-14th Centuries By Robert Bedrosian Ph.D. Dissertation, Columbia University (1979) Abstract: The 13-14th centuries was a period of great turbulence in the history of the Armenian people. Over roughly 170 years (from ca. 1220 to ca. 1403) Armenia was subjected to no less than 15 invasions of […]

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