Advertisement

Why hasn’t an earthquake toppled the Leaning Tower of Pisa?

Ironically, the very same soil that caused the leaning instability and brought the Tower to the verge of collapse, can be credited for helping it survive these seismic events.

How were medieval churches affected by the 2016 Umbrian earthquake?

In 2016, earthquakes in the Italian region of Umbria caused the collapse of several medieval churches, resulting in the destruction of local architectural and cultural heritage. A recent article investigates the cause of this problem and what may be done about it.

10 things you might not know about British cathedrals

Discover 10 curious facts you might not know about Great Britain’s most famous cathedrals.

Architecture in medieval Persian painting: fact or fantasy?

Robert Hillenbrand looks at how Persian painters tackled depicting architecture while also showing the process of construction, and how they operated within what to a Western eye might seem like constricting conventions.

“Stand by your man”: Caterina Lupi, wife of Bonifacio. Artistic patronage beyond the deathbed in late medieval Padua

The chance discovery of a document, some years ago led to the conclusion that the initial foundation of the chapel of St. James in Padua was a more complex affair. In this essay, I wish to turn to the most neglected collaborator until now, Caterina di Staggia, wife of Bonifacio.

Thousand-year-old cathedral surrenders its secrets, stone by stone

The secrets of Norway’s St Olav’s shrine and Nidaros Cathedral have drawn pilgrims for nearly a thousand years. Curious researchers have also made the journey, eager to solve the mysteries locked up in the cathedral’s stones.

Carpenters in Medieval London c. 1240 – c. 1540

Carpenters in medieval London have not previously been the focus of sustained research, either as a group, or as individuals. This thesis contributes fresh understanding to our perspective on London in the later Middle Ages by providing new information about this lesser known craft.

Statements in Stone: The Politics of Architecture in Charlemagne’s Aachen

Statements in Stone is an intersectional and preliminary study of the architecture and social aspects of the palatine complex of Aachen Germany during the reign of Charlemagne approximately spanning from the 790s to 814CE.

York Minster unveils restored grotesques

The first collection of new grotesques to be carved for York Minster’s 11 year project to conserve and restore its South Quire Aisle are being returned to the cathedral today.

‘Lost chapel’ of Westminster Palace revealed in new 3D model

The first dedicated House of Commons chamber, destroyed in the 1834 Palace of Westminster fire, has been reconstructed with the help of 3D visualisation technology.

Characteristics of Gothic Cathedrals in France and their Structural Elements

Cathedrals represent some of the finest examples of interconnections architectural, aesthetic, functional, but also the structural design of the building

St Augustine’s Abbey recreated digitally

St Augustine’s Abbey – part of Canterbury’s World Heritage site – has been ‘rebuilt’ in virtual reality as part of a ground-breaking collaboration between English Heritage and the University of Kent.

The Medieval History of the Pantheon

One of the great landmarks of ancient Rome is the Pantheon. Built around the year 126 AD by emperor Hadrian, it initially served as a temple to all gods. However, in the Early Middle Ages the Pantheon would be repurposed.

Original castle gates and doors: A Survey

Our survey will consider timber gates, doors and portcullis grilles that are still performing their original function with a brief overview of construction methods.

Crenellations: Crowning Castles

Crenellations are one of the most recognizable elements of a medieval castle. These upright projections resemble teeth, bared at invaders to prevent their attempted entries and at allies to show the owner’s strength. Each upright section is called a merlon or crenel, and they protected defenders from attacks. Defenses could be further increased by the […]

The Vaults of Santa Maria Novella and the Creation of Florentine Gothic

Historians of Gothic architecture, among them Louis Grodecki, have noted that Santa Maria Novella is one of the most beautiful examples of Italian Gothic without attempting to specify just what it is that sets Santa Maria Novella apart.

Petrified Powers: Materials, Forms, and Theories of Medieval Islamic Talismans

Persis Berlekamp is working on Islamic talismans created in the 12th to 15th centuries, focusing on objects from the Seljuk, Mongol and Timurid milieux.

From Ringwork to Stone Fortification: Power and the Evolution of Anglo-Norman Castles in North-Eastern Ireland

It focuses on two key and archaeologically well-explored castles: Trim and Carrickfergus, and their supporting fortification networks.

The Cathedral and the City

Another fantastic talk. Professor Caroline Bruzelius talks to us about medieval art, architecture, and the role of the cathedral in Medieval society.

Restauratio and Reuse: The Afterlife of Roman Ruins

As sustainability becomes ever more critical to the architectural profession, it is worth noting that the practice of recycling has a long history.

Gleanings from the 1253 Building Accounts of Westminster Abbey

Between 1220 and 1266, Salisbury Cathedral was built at a cost of £28,000.

Book Review: Hidden Britain by Alvin Nicholas

Tourism with a twist? Tired of the same old tours and droning guides? Alvin Nicholas’s book on manors, mansions, castles, nooks and crannies, reveals there’s more to Britain than meets the eye.

Climate Change and Medieval Sacred Architecture

This study attempts to provide illustrations of how climate may have influenced architectural features during the Middle Ages.

The Religious Reuse of Roman Structures in Anglo-Saxon England

The study examines burials associated with Roman structures, and churches on or near Roman buildings, to demonstrate that the physical remains of Roman structures had a significant impact on the religious landscape of Anglo-Saxon England despite the apparent discontinuity between many Roman and early-medieval landscapes.

medievalverse magazine