Making the Medieval Relevant: Crossing Boundaries: Interdisciplinary Studies on Disease and Disability

Dr. Christina Lee - Crossing Boundaries: Interdisciplinary Studies on Disease and Disability

A summary of a paper given by Professor Christina Lee at the University of Nottingham’s “Making the Medieval Relevant” Conference.

Old Companions, Noble Steeds: Why dogs and horses were buried at an Early Medieval settlement along the Old Rhine


Excavations at the Early Medieval site of Oegstgeest, located in the Dutch Rhine estuary, have yielded the burials of three horses and three dogs

1,000 year old silver treasure hoard discovered in Denmark

Coins discovered on the Danish island of Omø - photo courtesy Museum Vestsjælland

Over 550 silver items have been discovered on the Danish island of Omø. The hoard is believed to date from around the reign of Sweyn Forkbeard (986–1014) and includes coins and pieces of jewellery.

Understanding Torksey, Lincolnshire: A geoarchaeological and landscape approach to a Viking overwintering camp

Created by Robin Boulby / Wikimedia Commons

Viking overwintering camps of late 9th century England have been excluded from most recent dialogues regarding Viking Age England. Although overwintering camps are directly mentioned in historical records such as the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, these sites have remained archaeologically elusive.

Stable isotopes as indicators of change in the food procurement and food preference of Viking Age and Early Christian populations on Gotland (Sweden)

The traditional dish soused herring as it is served in Sweden - photo by Patrick Strang  / Wikipedia

In short, the end of the Viking Age may have involved a suite of environmental, economic, and sociocultural changes, yet despite these changes practices of food preference and food procurement were maintained within the coastal site of Ridanas. Our research contributes to archaeological th

Researching Architectural History Through Archaeology: The Case of Westminster Abbey

Warwick Rodwell

For half a millennium, scholars have researched and written about the history and architecture of Westminster Abbey, using documents and visual inspection. One might therefore assume that the architectural history of this iconic building is well understood, and in some respects it is.

Glimpse of medieval trade revealed along the River Forth

School pupils from St Ninian's Primary School uncovering the medieval harbour of Cambuskenneth Abbey © GUARD Archaeology Ltd

Over two weeks in September, the Cambuskenneth Harbours project brought together a wide range of experts and local volunteers to investigate the medieval harbour of Cambuskenneth Abbey, which lies on the River Forth near Stirling.

Byzantine-era mosaic map restored in Israel

Photo by Nikki Davidov, courtesy of the Israel Antiquities Authority

Although the Byzantine-era church that existed about 1500 years ago in southern Israel no longer exists, its mosaic floor has now been restored and shows a map revealing a scene of streets and buildings from an Egyptian town.

Between 50 and 75 medieval skeletons discovered at Westminster Abbey

Westminster Abbey - photo by Daniel Gillaspia / Flickr

Archaeologists have discovered the skeletal remains of between 50 to 75 individuals buried in the walls of Westminster Abbey. It is believed that they date from the 11th or early 12th century.

Fallen tree reveals medieval skeleton in Ireland

Photo from Sligo-Leitrim Archaeological Services / Facebook

Last May a storm in northwest Ireland blew over a 215-year old tree. It also unearth an unusual find – the skeletal remains of a young man who lived nearly a thousand years ago.

Finding the Battle of Bannockburn

Map of Bannockburn showing the new archaeological find spots and the likeliest course of the battle over 23 and 24 June 1314. © Tony Pollard / GUARD Archaeology Ltd

Between 2011 and 2014, a new search for the site of the Battle of Bannockburn took place, spurred on by the 700th anniversary of the battle and the National Trust for Scotland’s new state-of-the-art Bannockburn Battlefield Centre.

The Newport Medieval Ship in Context: The Life and Times of a 15th Century Merchant Vessel Trading in Western Europe

Newport Medieval Ship in Context

This paper presents a summary of recent research into the broader economic, cultural and political world in which the Newport Medieval Ship was built and operated.

Drone Technology Aids in Discoveries at Medieval Irish Sites

Archaeological Discoveries in Ireland

Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) have been gaining attention in the news for the last few years, but archaeologists like Saint Louis University history professor Thomas Finan, Ph.D., have always appreciated what aerial photography could accomplish.

Mosaics discovered at Byzantine-era Synagogue in Israel

The newly found mosaic with an inscription in the Horvat Kur synagogue (photographed by Jaakko Haapanen,; © Kinneret Regional Project.

Excavations of a medieval synagogue in Israel dating to the Byzantine period (4th—7th c. CE) have uncovered a partially-preserved colorful mosaic floor.

The Last Viking and his Magical Sword?

viking magic sword - Photo: Ellen C. Holthe, Museum of Cultural History, University of Oslo

An amazing discovery of a late Viking Age sword – embellished with gold, inscriptions and other ornamentation – has now been revealed in Norway.

The Afterlife of the Dead: Reform in Attitude Towards Medieval Burials, Corpses and Bones

Rothwell Charnel Chapel. Photo courtesy of ITV.

The International Medieval Congress is taking place at the University of Leeds, I’m on hand this week to report on the conference. This blog post reports on my first session.

Byzantine church discovered near Jerusalem

Remains of a Byzantine church discovered near Jerusalem. Photo by Skyview Company, courtesy Israel Antiquities Authority

Archaeologists in Israel have discovered the remains of a Byzantine church and road station just west of Jerusalem. The site is believed to be about 1500 years old.

Early Christian Mosaic Floor discovered in Nazareth

mosaic floor nazareth

Mosaic floor found under the Church of the Annunciation is believed to date to the fourth century.

Remains of a Medieval Building Discovered in Lincoln

medieval wall lincoln - photo courtesy Lincolnshire County Council

Construction workers in the English city of Lincoln have discovered a medieval wall, which is believed to have been part of a 12th-century house or shop

Medieval poaching site discovered in England

medieval deer hunting scene - British Library Egerton 1146   f. 5v

Archaeologists working in northern England have uncovered a stone-lined cess pit that was filled with dozens of bones from deer. The evidence suggests that they were dumped here by poachers.

Caliph’s palace on the shores of the Sea of Galilee to be restored

Aerial view of the excavated early Islamic caliph's palace Khirbat al-Minya (photo/©: Yaniv Darvasi, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem)

The German government will be funding archaeologists to help restored an Umayyad palace dating back to the early eighth century.

From the Viking’s grave to the sunken ship: how photogrammetry is changing archaeology

Detailed image of a shield boss found in what is likely a Viking’s grave in Skaun. Photo: NTNU University Museum

Mapping archaeological digs takes plenty of time and a lot of measuring, photographing, drawing and note taking. Now, most of this work can be done with a technique called photogrammetry.

Viking dragon’s head discovered in Sweden

dragons head - photo courtesy Stockholm University

Archaeologists from Sweden and Germany have discovered a little dragon’s head while digging in the port of the Viking town of Birka near Stockholm.

Anglo-Saxon skeleton shows leprosy may have spread to Britain from Scandinavia

Foot Bones of Anglo-Saxon skeleton - photo courtesy University of Southampton

The bones of the man, probably in his 20s, show changes consistent with leprosy, such as narrowing of the toe bones and damage to the joints, suggesting a very early British case.

New book sheds light on Hereford’s medieval past

Possible knight - a man of Norman origin whose injuries might be consistent with violence or combat - photo courtesy Headland Archaeology

A leading archaeologist, who uncovered the remains of what might be a wounded Knight, will reveal extraordinary details of medieval life in Hereford in a new book.

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