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Cross-Channel Marriage and Royal Succession in the Age of Charles the Simple and Athelstan (c. 916-936)

This article discusses the marriages of four Anglo-Saxon princesses to Continental kings and princes between the years 917 and 930.

Mass grave maybe from the Viking Great Army, archaeologists find

A team of archaeologists has discovered that a mass grave uncovered in the 1980s dates to the Viking Age and may have been a burial site of the Viking Great Army war dead.

Anglo-Saxon Punishments: The Price of a Pinky

Recognizing that an eye for an eye makes the whole world blind, medieval lawmakers believed that justice could be satisfied by aggressors making financial compensation to victims.

New Medieval Books: The Anglo-Saxon World

Here are five (plus one) new books about Anglo-Saxon England.

Research into Anglo-Saxon burials uncover new insights

Christine Cave, a PhD candidate at the Austrialian National University, has developed a new method for determining the age-of-death for skeletal remains based on how worn the teeth are.

Reading the Exeter Book Riddles as Life-Writing

The recent explosion of interest in the theory and practice of ‘life-writing’ provides a valuable new opportunity to reassess these texts with new critical tools at hand.

Anglo-Saxon Medicine and Disease: A Semantic Approach

The main purpose of the examination is to determine the extent to which scholarly ideas concerning the nature of the human body and the causes of disease were preserved between the Latin texts and the English texts which were translated and compiled from them.

A Short Cut: the minting of Anglo Saxon cut coins

Whilst the production of the coinage of Anglo-Saxon England is generally well documented there is remarkably little literature concerning the minting of cut pieces: that is, the halfpennies and farthings that make up a substantial  proportion of the coins that were in circulation.

The Watlington Hoard: The Viking Treasure that Marked the Foundation of England

Having you ever visited and been dazzled by Anglo-Saxon collection at the Ashmolean Museum, a priceless treasure hoard that the Museum has fought hard to keep earlier this year?

The War for Mercia, 942-943

This article examines political and military developments in the midlands during the reign of Edmund I, including the West Saxon king’s campaign in the Five Boroughs, the subsequent attacks by the Viking king of Northumbria, and the treaty between the two in 943.

A Lifeʼs Worth: Reexamining Wergild in the Anglo-Saxon Royal Law Codes (c. 600-1035)

In the wide and growing world of Anglo-Saxon scholarship, wergild has an at once ubiquitous and spectral presence.

Making or Breaking a King: Kingship Ideals in Anglo-Saxon Historiography

This research will fit into the niche between works on specific kings and the analyses of those texts pertaining directly to them, since it will add a comparative angle. It will discover the ways in which written medieval sources created a literary image of a king, as opposed to only preserving the facts.

Sutton Hoo to be transformed

£1.8 million grant from the Heritage Lottery Fund will lead to a new experience for visitors of the famous Anglo-Saxon site.

The limits of the late Anglo-Saxon state

Were there structural flaws in the late Anglo-Saxon state which contributed to its demise?

English Nationalism in ‘The Battle of Maldon’ and ‘The Battle of Brunanburh’

To identify nationalism, one can look at the ways in which the literature promotes the ideas of English culture. In doing this, the poets not only celebrate Englishness, but also present ideals that promote nationalism in the poems’ audience

The Medieval Magazine (Volume 3, No. 14) : Historic Selfies!

In this issue: Historic selfies with the medieval kings of France, and in Renaissance coins, the Anglo-Saxon fenlands, and how DNA research on chickens is linked to medieval diet and fasting traditions. We visit Anne Boleyn’s childhood home and look at the Holy Spirit in female form.

Pilgrim and patron: Cnut in post-conquest historical writing

This article examines a number of short narratives from the late eleventh and early twelfth centuries which relate to the activities of Cnut as king of England.

A Dynasty of Saints

By all accounts, St. Æthelthryth was married twice and remained a virgin. During her life she was a princess of East Anglia, queen of Northumbria, and finally abbess and founder of the monastery at Ely.

Thousands of Vikings were based at Torksey camp, archaeologists find

A huge camp which was home to thousands of Vikings as they prepared to conquer England in the late ninth century has been uncovered by archaeologists.

When did the Vikings start raiding England?

A fresh examination of written records from Anglo-Saxon England suggests that the Vikings were raiding the country even before their infamous attack on Lindisfarne in the year 793.

Say What I am Called: A Corpus of Anglo-Saxon Self-Referential Inscriptions

This thesis compiles a working corpus of Anglo-Saxon self-referential inscribed artifacts to examine how the inscriptions and supports utilize self-reference to push the viewer to understand the social and cultural significance of such objects.

A Wealth of Evidence: The Identity of the Man Commemorated at Sutton Hoo

Was it a wealthy merchant, a warrior from overseas, or a great king? This paper gathers, presents, and scrutinizes the evidence and arguments from ancient records, opulate grave-goods, and contemporary investigations in an attempt to determine the most likely candidate for the individual interred in Mound 1 at Sutton Hoo.

Book Excerpt: Warriors and Kings The 1500-Year Battle For Celtic Britain by Martin Wall

For those of you looking for something Celtic to read this spring, author Martin Wall brings us Warriors and Kings: The 1500-Year Battle for Celtic Britain.

Book Review: Occupying Space in Medieval and Early Modern Britain and Ireland

Our review of ‘Occupying Space in Medieval and Early Modern Britain and Ireland’

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