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Book Excerpt: Warriors and Kings The 1500-Year Battle For Celtic Britain by Martin Wall

For those of you looking for something Celtic to read this spring, author Martin Wall brings us Warriors and Kings: The 1500-Year Battle for Celtic Britain.

Book Review: Occupying Space in Medieval and Early Modern Britain and Ireland

Our review of ‘Occupying Space in Medieval and Early Modern Britain and Ireland’

Book Review: A Medieval Woman’s Companion by Susan Signe Morrison

Susan Signe Morrison’s book, “A Medieval Woman’s Companion” brings the contributions of medieval women, famous and obscure, to the forefront in this fantastic introductory text.

Hoard of King Alfred the Great goes to Ashmolean Museum

The Ashmolean Museum will be purchasing a treasure hoard dating back to time of King Alfred the Great. The museum, which is located in Oxford, has raised the £1.35 million to fund the purchase.

King Æthelstan in the English, Continental and Scandinavian Traditions of the Tenth to the Thirteenth Centuries

Using close textual analysis, this thesis has identified similarities and differences in the ways in which the Anglo-Saxon king, Æthelstan, is depicted in narrative sources from England, the Continent and Scandinavia during the tenth to the thirteenth centuries

Discovery of Lost Early Medieval Kingdom in Galloway

Archaeological research has just been published which reveals the location of a hitherto lost early medieval kingdom that was once pre-eminent in Scotland and Northern England.

Identification, Geochemical Characterisation and Significance of Bitumen among the Grave Goods of the 7th Century Mound 1 Ship-Burial at Sutton Hoo (Suffolk, UK)

The 7th century ship-burial at Sutton Hoo is famous for the spectacular treasure discovered when it was first excavated in 1939.

Allegories of Sight: Blinding and Power in Late Anglo-Saxon England

The practical necessity of sight to effective participation in Anglo-Saxon life is reflected in the multifaceted depictions of punitive blinding in late Anglo-Saxon literature.

Ælla and the Descendants of Ivar: Politics and Legend in the Viking Age

In March 867 the Northumbrian king Ælla died at York during a battle against the Scandinavian ‘Great Army’. Two years later, further south, the same force dealt a similar end to the ruler of East Anglia.

Basileos Anglorum: a study of the life and reign of King Athelstan of England, 924-939

The reign of Athelstan of England is of central importance to Anglo-Saxon history and has unexpected significance for contemporary continental history.

BOOK EXCERPT: King Cnut and the Viking Conquest of England 1016 by W.B. Bartlett

The Viking Conquest of England in 1016, saw two great warriors, the Danish prince Cnut, and his equally ruthless English opponent, King Edmund Ironside fight an epic campaign.

The Diagnosis and Treatment of Wounds in the Old English Medical Collections: Anglo-Saxon Surgery?

Early medieval England was a dangerous environment with a high risk of physical harm, which could result from warfare, day-to-day lawlessness, or accidents in the home or the workplace.

The Mandrake Plant and Six Anglo-Saxon Cures

Plants were a vital source of potential cures in the Middle Ages, and the mandrake was considered to be one of the most powerful of these. However, you needed a hungry dog to help you catch one!

Kingship-in-Death in the Bayeux Tapestry

The interpretation of the purpose of the Bayeux tapestry hinges on two key scenes, Harold’s oath-taking at Bayeux and the death-bed of King Edward.

Book Excerpt & Promotion! The Norman Conquest: William the Conqueror’s Subjugation of England by Teresa Cole

The Norman Conquest: William the Conqueror’s Subjugation of England look at the origins, course and outcomes of William the Conqueror’s conquest of England 1051-1087.

Geoffrey of Monmouth’s Portrayal of the Arrival of Christianity in Britain: Fact or Fiction?

I would like to suggest that an open-minded approach to a reading of the Historia Regum Britanniae shows that Geoffrey does not entirely deserve his reputation.

Conference explores the Anglo-Saxon site at Rendlesham

Historians and archaeologists are meeting today to discuss one of the largest and richest settlements of Anglo-Saxon England. ‘Anglo-Saxon Rendlesham, a Royal Centre of the East Anglian Kingdom’, taking place in Bury St Edmunds, will present new research on the internationally important archaeological discovery to the wider public.

That Other Battle of 1066 – Commemorating the 950th Anniversary of Stamford Bridge

The JORVIK Viking Centre will be hosting for a special walking tour of the battlefield at Stamford Bridge, just outside of York.

The sons of Eadmund Ironside, Anglo-Saxon king at the court of Saint Stephen

Eadmund Ironside died shortly after his agreement with Canute, King of Denmark, deciding the boundaries of his realm. His decease took place on 30th November 1016.

Iron Age and Anglo-Saxon genomes from East England reveal British migration history

British population history has been shaped by a series of immigrations, including the early Anglo-Saxon migrations after 400 CE. It remains an open question how these events affected the genetic composition of the current British population.

Soldiers to Warriors: Renegotiating the Roman Frontier in the Fifth Century

There has been a presumption that only the poorest soldiers remained in very small numbers by the end of the Roman period, c ad 410, if not withdrawn completely at the command of an emperor or usurper; but there are no documentary sources that validate this, and there is a considerable amount of archaeological evidence that disproves it.

BOOK REVIEW: The Anglo-Saxons in 100 Facts by Martin Wall

Looking for a “historical beach read” this summer? Look no further. Martin Wall’s latest book, The Anglo-Saxons in 100 Facts brings pre-conquest England to life in a chronological series full of interesting, humorous and gruesome facts about the Anglo Saxons.

A haunch for Hrothgar

Naomi Sykes takes a taste of venison amid the Feast Halls of Anglo-Saxon England

Baptism in Anglo-Saxon England

This thesis examines the lexical field of baptism in Old English. The lexical development of the field and the semantic development of the individual lexemes were evaluated: the verbs fulwian, cristnian, depan, dyppan, and the vocabulary for baptismal water in Old English. At every stage of the project, the linguistic data was correlated to theological, liturgical and cultural backgrounds.

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