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King Æthelstan in the English, Continental and Scandinavian Traditions of the Tenth to the Thirteenth Centuries

Using close textual analysis, this thesis has identified similarities and differences in the ways in which the Anglo-Saxon king, Æthelstan, is depicted in narrative sources from England, the Continent and Scandinavia during the tenth to the thirteenth centuries

The Sisters of King Æthelstan

King Edward the Elder, son and successor of Alfred the Great of England, had many children.

Æthelstan, Anglo-Saxon King of England

Æthelstan was the first King of Wessex to bring together all the Anglo-Saxon kingdoms in England. He was well educated, very pious and a collector of saints relics and manuscripts. He was also a formidable warrior.

Æthelstan, “King of all Britain” : royal and imperial ideology in tenth-century England

This thesis examines how King Æthelstan legitimized and systematized his claims of power and status through a royal ideology, how that ideology emerged, what it consisted of, and how it manifested itself in his kingship and diplomacy.

The Secrets of a Dark Ages King

In his own lifetime, Athelstan, the grandson of Alfred of Great, was praised as ‘the English Charlemagne.’ By defeating the combined armies of Danes, Scots and Welsh in the Battle of Brunanburh in 937 AD, Athelstan could rightly claim the title of ‘King of all Britain.’

The Justification of the Conquest Chapter 1 of Conquered England: Kingship, Succession, and Tenure 1066-1166

The Justification of the Conquest Chapter 1 of Conquered England: Kingship, Succession, and Tenure 1066-1166 Garnett, George Abstract The author of the D manuscript of the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle was almost certainly a member of Archbishop Ealdred of York’s household. He was, therefore, probably at the centre of events during 1066, and his testimony deserves to be […]

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