• The Medieval Magazine (Volume 2 Issue 23)

    Collaborative team projects yield Gold-Medal-worthy results, joust with champions at Hampton Court Palace, take a tour of the Getty Museum’s new manuscript exhibit “Things Unseen,” and watch Viking experts test out a new game!

    The Medieval Magazine (Volume 2 Issue 23)
  • BOOK REVIEW: A Million Years in a Day – Greg Jenner

    Want to know how daylight savings time started? Who really invented the modern toilet? Were the Vikings really filthy Barbarians? Did Early Modern people think bathing was dangerous? This book aims to answer these questions (and many more!) as Greg Jenner takes us from sun up to sun down, through a million years in one day.

    BOOK REVIEW: A Million Years in a Day – Greg Jenner
  • Did Henry VIII Suffer from Head Trauma?

    By Danièle Cybulskie It’s a question that pretty much anyone looking at the arc of his life ends up asking: what happened to Henry VIII? From a hugely-admired prince, to a widely-feared king, the transformation in Henry’s behaviour and outlook would seem like the stuff of fiction, but for the fact that history bears out… [Continue Reading]

    Did Henry VIII Suffer from Head Trauma?
  • Book Talk: A Conversation with Guy Gavriel Kay

    Set in a parallel Renaissance world, two major religions, the Jaddites who worship the sun, and the Asharites who worship the stars, struggle amidst the backdrop of court politics, murder, espionage, faith and family.

    Book Talk: A Conversation with Guy Gavriel Kay
  • Places to See: London in 7 Drinks

    Can you tell history through a pint? Or a cup of coffee perhaps? According to Dr. Matthew Green you can. The historian and author turned his passion for history into Unreal City Audio: London Walking Tours.

    Places to See: London in 7 Drinks
  • How to Make Medieval Artists’ Tools

    by Danièle Cybulskie If there’s one thing medieval people loved, it was writing educational treatises. Sometimes, these were a little on the fantastic side – like bestiaries or travel literature – but other times, they were extremely useful how-to manuals. I particularly love the how-to manuals because they can teach us so much about medieval… [Continue Reading]

    How to Make Medieval Artists’ Tools
  • BOOK REVIEW: The Anglo-Saxons in 100 Facts by Martin Wall

    Looking for a “historical beach read” this summer? Look no further. Martin Wall’s latest book, The Anglo-Saxons in 100 Facts brings pre-conquest England to life in a chronological series full of interesting, humorous and gruesome facts about the Anglo Saxons.

    BOOK REVIEW: The Anglo-Saxons in 100 Facts by Martin Wall

Medieval News

Detail from 15th-century painting by Gentile da Fabriano, showing horses

Call for Papers: Special on Sessions Medieval Equestrianism at IMC 2017

Following the success of Medieval Equestrianism Sessions at the IMC Leeds 2016, we invite papers for special sessions on medieval equestrian history for the International Medieval Congress at Leeds in 2017.

Henry VIII

Did Henry VIII Suffer from Head Trauma?

By Danièle Cybulskie It’s a question that pretty much anyone looking at the arc of his life ends up asking: what happened to Henry VIII? From a hugely-admired prince, to a widely-feared king, the transformation in Henry’s behaviour and outlook would seem like the stuff of fiction, but for the fact that history bears out […]

Castel Valer, Tassullo, Italy  Photo: (C) 2016 Alessandro Carpentiero

80-Room Medieval Italian castle to be sold for first time in its history

Castel Valer, a lavishly decorated medieval castle in northern Italy, which has been owned by the same family who obtained the estate in the fourteenth century, is set to be sold at auction on 8th September 2016.

Radimlja, one of the most valuable and most important necropolis of stećci in Bosnia and Herzegovina - Photo by Litany / Wikimedia Commons

Four medieval sites added to UNESCO’s World Heritage List

Medieval sites in Europe, Asia and the Pacific have been added to the World Heritage List this week, as part of UNESCO’s World Heritage Meetings, which have been taking place in Istanbul.

medieval warfare magazine 2016

Medieval Warfare Magazine – Volume 6 Issue 3

This summer you can read about the so-called ‘Last War of Antiquity’. The theme of the latest issue of Medieval Warfare is the Byzantine-Sassanid War of the seventh-century.

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Medieval Articles

Edmund II of England and his family - Edward the Exile, Edgar the Ætheling, Saint Margaret of Scotland, Edmund , Cristina

The sons of Eadmund Ironside, Anglo-Saxon king at the court of Saint Stephen

Eadmund Ironside died shortly after his agreement with Canute, King of Denmark, deciding the boundaries of his realm. His decease took place on 30th November 1016.

Codex Manesse, UB Heidelberg, Cod. Pal. germ. 848, fol. 264r: Der Tannhäuser

The Statutes of the Teutonic Knights: A Study of Religious Chivalry

The purpose of this study is to examine the role of the religious military orders, and of the Teutonic Knights in particular, within the process of change in developing the concept of a religious and a Christian warrior during the Crusades, or, in other words, how the existing Latin ideal of religious retreat was adapted, blended and attached to the chivalric image of Western Europe in the Holy Land, as reflected in the statutes of the Teutonic Knights.

Trim Castle - photo by Anna & Michal / Flickr

From Ringwork to Stone Fortification: Power and the Evolution of Anglo-Norman Castles in North-Eastern Ireland

It focuses on two key and archaeologically well-explored castles: Trim and Carrickfergus, and their supporting fortification networks.

Photo by judy dean / Flickr

Book fastenings and furnishings: an archaeology of late medieval books

Throughout the late medieval period, books were an integral part of religious monastic life, and yet such objects have received little attention from an analytical archaeological perspective, despite the significant quantity of metal book fittings recovered from archaeological sites.

byzantium

The Western presence in the Byzantine Empire during the reigns of Alexios I and John II Komnenos (1081-1143)

Contacts between Byzantium and the West increased during this period, which witnessed significant events like the First Crusade and the expansion of the Italian trading communities.

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Medieval Videos

Tea and Other Decoctions for ‘Nourishing Life’ in Medieval China

Professor Benn examines one significant way in which tea, a relatively new beverage in Tang-dynasty China, was first consumed and understood, alongside other decoctions intended to promote health and wellness.

Negotiating the Sacred: Byzantium, Venice and the True Cross in Late Medieval Venice

Dr. Klein’s lecture about art, faith and politics in late medieval Venice.

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Medieval Books

BOOK REVIEW: A Million Years in a Day – Greg Jenner

Want to know how daylight savings time started? Who really invented the modern toilet? Were the Vikings really filthy Barbarians? Did Early Modern people think bathing was dangerous? This book aims to answer these questions (and many more!) as Greg Jenner takes us from sun up to sun down, through a million years in one day.

Medieval Maritime Warfare

Charles Stanton uses an innovative and involving approach to describe this fascinating but neglected facet of European medieval history.

Book Talk: A Conversation with Guy Gavriel Kay

Set in a parallel Renaissance world, two major religions, the Jaddites who worship the sun, and the Asharites who worship the stars, struggle amidst the backdrop of court politics, murder, espionage, faith and family.

More Posts from this Category

Medieval Movies & TV

Movie Review: Pope Joan – Medieval Legend Comes to Life Onscreen

Released in 2009, also under its German title, ,Die Päpstin,, ,Pope Joan’ recounts the medieval legend of Johanna von Ingleheim, a woman who disguised herself as a man, lived as a monk, and eventually went on to become pope in the ninth century.

The World’s Worst Fantasy Film: In the Name of the King

What do you get when you mix Burt Reynolds, Jason Statham, Ray Liotta and Ron Perlman in a movie together? You get a horrible movie. Those worlds are never meant to collide, and never in a fantasy movie.

Friendship, Betrayal, War: “Soldier of God” Movie Review

A Templar and a Muslim; their strange friendship is the premise of this week’s movie based in the 12th century immediately after the disastrous Battle of Hattin.

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More Medieval History

Making the Medieval Relevant: Crossing Boundaries: Interdisciplinary Studies on Disease and Disability

A summary of a paper given by Professor Christina Lee at the University of Nottingham’s “Making the Medieval Relevant” Conference.

Imprisonment, Execution and Escape: Medieval History and the National Curriculum

The final talk in Sesson #1041, Engaging the Public with the Medieval World, looked at what English children are being taught in school. How much medieval history is in the new programme that was released in September 2014? Megan Gooch, Curator at the Historic Royal Palaces breaks down the English system for us in her paper, ‘Imprisonment, Execution, and Escape: Medieval History and the National Curriculum’.

Making the Castle a Home: Creating an Immersive Medieval World Using Live Costumed Interpreters

How does the use of unscripted, adaptive, historical interpretation boost the tourist experience? Right on the heels of our look at the Tower of London’s visitor engagement, we heard a paper from Lauren Johnson, Research Manager for Past Pleasures, the oldest historical interpretation company in the UK who educate and entertain the public at historical sites, museums, on stage and and on TV.

‘But Where are the Dungeons?’: How to Engage the Public at the Tower of London

A talk about how historical sites, like the Tower of London engage the public. How to handle visitor expectations, what do people come t see and how to tell history in a captivating but accurate manner.

Kindred of the Sea – Young Adult Fiction series about the Vikings

These three novels in the series Kindred of the Sea, by C.J. Adrien, are aimed at a young adult/teen audience

Daughter of Destiny, by Nicole Evelina

Before queenship and Camelot, Guinevere was a priestess of Avalon. She loved another before Arthur, a warrior who would one day betray her.

The Last Kingdom: An Interview with Bernard Cornwell

What I find most compelling is the struggle to create a country which became England, a struggle that must have seemed hopeless at times and which roiled Britain in constant fighting. We think of England (especially) as a peaceful landscape, but in the 9th, 10th and 11th centuries it was horribly brutal and merciless.

Teaching Historical Theory through Video Games

The potential of video games for teaching history is receiving increasing recognition. However, the greatest emphasis is on their use as tools in secondary education. The few studies focusing on undergraduate education demonstrate the use of games to create an immersive historical experience with counterfactual options.

Minecraft and the Middle Ages

It is one of the most popular video games ever created. Moreover, educators are finding ways to use Minecraft as a teaching tool, and one that could be ideal for learning about the Middle Ages.

Gareth Hinds’ Beowulf

Dark and visceral, the graphic novel version of Beowulf created by Gareth Hinds is considered to be one of the most successful adaptations of the Old English tale.

Using LEGO to teach the Middle Ages

Here are a few ideas that teachers can use to teach the Middle Ages with LEGO

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