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10 New Youtube Videos for Medieval Lovers: From an Old Norse ‘Hello’ to heckling a knight

Ten new videos on Youtube for your watching pleasure!

How the borders of the British Isles changed during the Middle Ages

This video shows the rise and fall of kingdom and states in the British Isles from the year 43 CE to 2016.

How the borders of Asia changed during the Middle Ages

Here are a few sets of videos to show the rise and fall of kingdoms, states and empires on the continent of Asia, including during the medieval period.

How the borders of Europe changed during the Middle Ages

One interesting way of looking at the past is to see how much the borders of the world have changed. In these videos, a reconstruction has been made to show the rise and fall of European kingdoms, states, and empires over the years, decades and centuries.

Winners, Wasters, and the Shadow of Envy: Theories of Justice and the Scene of Medieval Literature

Is envy at the root of all claims for justice (so says Freud), or is envy a regrettable but surmountable human tendency that will be minimized in a just society (as Rawls has it)?

Drugs, Books, Patients: Marketing Medieval Medicine

Because a number of health care structures were established in the Middle Ages this lecture tries to answer questions about how medieval medicine laid the groundwork for drug regulations.

Architecture in medieval Persian painting: fact or fantasy?

Robert Hillenbrand looks at how Persian painters tackled depicting architecture while also showing the process of construction, and how they operated within what to a Western eye might seem like constricting conventions.

St. Theodore, Euchaïta and Anatolia, c. 500-1000 CE: Landscape, Climate and the Survival of an Empire

St Theodore ‘the recruit’ was one of the most important military saints of the Byzantine and wider medieval world, and his cult center, at Euchaïta in northern Turkey, was famous from the fifth century on.

Bloodfeud and Miracles: Creating and Killing a Saint

Hrafn Sveinbjarnarson was a physician and chieftain in Iceland who was drawn into a bloodfeud that ultimately resulted in his death.

Chaucer’s Decameron and the Wife of Bath’s Tale: Why Do Literary History?

A possible direct link between the two greatest literary collections of the fourteenth century, Boccaccio’s Decameron and Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales, has long tantalized readers because these works share many stories, which are, moreover, placed in similar frames.

The Audacious Metaphors of Mystical Women: The Model of Caterina da Siena

Religious education for women included spiritual meditation by which it was specifically taught to revive the life and passion of Christ. Caterina da Siena has been a model for many mystical writers.

10 New Youtube Videos for Medieval Lovers – Volume 4

Ten videos posted in the last month on Youtube for the medievalist’s viewing pleasure!

Who was Christine de Pizan?

Danièle Cybulskie talks about an awesome fifteenth-century female writer: Christine de Pizan.

Trust and Credit: The Mercantile Culture of Risk in Renaissance Italy

Renaissance Italy was a society in which the problems of how to trust and whom to trust presented perennial challenges; yet it also housed a vibrant, transcontinental, proto-capitalist economy that relied on trust for its functioning.

Imagining the Virgin in the Byzantine Night

In the early Byzantine period, the Virgin Mary rose to prominence among Christians – especially in the capital city of Constantinople.

Sephardic Food and Identity in Medieval Spain

This talk explores what foods were recommended by Sephardic authors as part of a healthy and spiritually rewarding lifestyle, as well as how Sephardic cuisine had a prominent place in the literary and cultural imagination of medieval Christian Spaniards.

Slavery, Violence and the Origin of Serfdom in Late Medieval Galicia

This presentation discusses the interrelation between slavery and serfdom in fifteenth-century Galicia (Red Ruthenia).

The Four Portraits of Het‘um II: New Observations Regarding the Royal Portrait of the Lectionary of 1286

The subject of this paper is one of the most mysterious characters in the history of the Armenian kingdom of Cilicia – King Het’um II – and his four surviving portraits.

The Ideological Power of Some Almohad Illuminated Manuscripts

From the mid-12th century, the production of lavishly illuminated copies of certain texts acquired a special ideological meaning in the Maghrib, due to the rise of the Almohads.

Evoking Tales in a Medieval Ceiling: Sulayman’s / Solomon’s Birds in the Capella Palatina of Palermo

A great multitude of birds populate the painted ceilings sheltering the palatine chapel of Palermo, constructed for King Roger of Sicily; these birds appear to shelter and rest in the great ceiling. As ceilings were often made to represent the sky, thee pictorial associations of birds and ceilings is only logical.

The Road to China: Seaborne Exploration in Medieval Islam

This lecture explores how sea and mainland trade with China was one of the most important aspects of the flourishing of Islam in the Middle Ages.

Who was Edward I?

The Five-Minute Medievalist talks about the life and times of Edward I, King of England.

Medieval Grooming Tools

The Five-Minute Medievalist takes a look at some of the grooming tools from the Middle Ages that she has come across in her travels.

When were the Middle Ages?

The Five-Minute Medievalist answers the question, ‘When were the Middle Ages?’

The Evangelical Pearl: The Last Masterpiece of Medieval Female Mysticism

This paper explores the writings of the anonymous, 16th-century female author of The Evangelical Pearl. Written in the Dutch vernacular and first published in 1537, the work proved to be a popular and influential one.

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