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White, Black and Grey: recent discoveries at Aberdeen’s medieval friaries

Recent excavations at Robert Gordon’s College in Aberdeen have revealed 30 burials from the medieval Dominican (Black) friary as well as hints at remains of the buildings. This talk will present the latest evidence from this site and look at the other excavated medieval friaries, Franciscan (Grey) and Carmelite (white).

Legal Arguments: The Medieval Origin of a European Invention

What do we mean as we say that ‘During the Middle Ages Roman Law became the shared common law of Europe’?

Medieval Medicine for Modern Infections

Recent scholarship may show that there is more methodology to the medicines of medieval practitioners and further inquiry may show that their medicines were more than just placebos or palliative aids but actual antibiotics being used long before the advent of modern infection control.

Enviable Possessions: The Thirteenth-Century Gemellions of Limoges

One of the most common images of ritual hand-washing in the medieval period depicts the Gospel account of the Roman procurator Pontius Pilate washing his hands after condemning Jesus to death.

A Dynasty of Saints

By all accounts, St. Æthelthryth was married twice and remained a virgin. During her life she was a princess of East Anglia, queen of Northumbria, and finally abbess and founder of the monastery at Ely.

The Light of Nature? No ‘Experience’ in the Middle Ages!

When we think of the concept of experience, we would most likely not be thinking of the Middle Ages.

Medieval Ideas of the Multiverse

To most of the theologians in Paris, anything not forbidden by logical contradiction was possible for God.

Reclaiming past, present and future stories of a deserted medieval village

This practice-based research explores challenges in documenting the physically shifting site of a deserted medieval village, previously an island and now a reclaimed landscape, located on a saltmarsh in East Sussex.

The Shadow of Chinggis Khan on Istanbul: The Ottoman Empire in the Early Modern Asian Context, 1300 – 1600

Prof. Ali Yaycioğlu examines the making of the Ottoman State and socio-economic formation between the late 14th to the 17th centuries.

Baghdad as a Center of Learning and Book Production

Why does Baghdad become some an enormous centre of book production – of literature and the physical production of books?

Common Rights and Natural Resources: The 1217 Charter of the Forest in Historical Perspective

It is the 800th anniversary of the Charter of the Forest in 1217.

Imagining the Past: Interplay between literary and visual imagery in late medieval France

Her research examines the relationships between text and image in vernacular late medieval French manuscripts.

Medieval Archery at The Royal Garrison

We’re trying out medieval archery at The Royal Garrison in Guelph, Ontario, Canada.

Merchants’ Marks in Medieval English Books

Merchants’ marks were used initially as a tool of commerce, on consignments of goods, in the Middle Ages.

Was There History in the Middle Ages?

Did medieval writers think they were writing history? Emily A. Winkler takes a closer look at the various forms of ‘history’ during this period.

Changing Places: a comparative discussion of London and Tours in the Early Medieval Period

This paper examines the developmental stages that occurred at two settlements which saw significant changes from the 5th to 12th centuries AD; London and Tours.

How and when Venice became Venice: Framing the urban development of a trading town in Italy

Venice was one of the most important cities in Europe in the late Middle Ages and the Modern era, when it formed an independent state which controlled trade across the Mediterranean and towards the Levant.

The use and the abuse of history, national heritage and nationalism

‘Icelanders or Norwegians? Leifur, Snorri and national identity then and now’ followed by a panel discussion

The Christian Singer: Charlemagne and Beyond

How did this Gregorian or Frankish-Roman music come into existence?

Local and Global: Medieval Art in an Age of New Nationalisms

In light of recent world events, this talk addresses some of the disciplinary questions about methodology and classification that underlie the study and teaching of medieval art today.

Mapping the World in Medieval China

This talk looks at the extent of geographic and cartographic knowledge of the world that existed in medieval China.

Opening the Macclesfield Psalter: Patrons and Priories

It is undeniable that the Macclesfield Psalter is virtually unrivalled for its lavish illustrations. The gilded representations of structural, organic and allegorical elements are alluring and were certainly significant for the medieval recipients. Despite its beauty and rare pigments it was not just a work of art to simply gaze upon.

The Desire for Solitude: The Secret Poems of Irish Monks

Medieval monks worked long hours in silence copying and illustrating manuscripts. But what happened when their minds began to wander?

The Emotional Lives of Epidemics: Hate and Compassion from the Plague of Athens to AIDS

From an interdisciplinary array of scholars, a consensus has emerged: invariably, epidemics in past times provoked class hatred, blamed the ‘other’, and victimized the victims of epidemic diseases.

The geography of a cemetery – the early Christian cemeteries of Skagafjördur, North Iceland

In the last decade early Christian churches and cemeteries in the region of Skagafjördur, North Iceland, have been the object of extensive archaeological research.

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