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The Four Portraits of Het‘um II: New Observations Regarding the Royal Portrait of the Lectionary of 1286

The subject of this paper is one of the most mysterious characters in the history of the Armenian kingdom of Cilicia – King Het’um II – and his four surviving portraits.

The Ideological Power of Some Almohad Illuminated Manuscripts

From the mid-12th century, the production of lavishly illuminated copies of certain texts acquired a special ideological meaning in the Maghrib, due to the rise of the Almohads.

Evoking Tales in a Medieval Ceiling: Sulayman’s / Solomon’s Birds in the Capella Palatina of Palermo

A great multitude of birds populate the painted ceilings sheltering the palatine chapel of Palermo, constructed for King Roger of Sicily; these birds appear to shelter and rest in the great ceiling. As ceilings were often made to represent the sky, thee pictorial associations of birds and ceilings is only logical.

The Road to China: Seaborne Exploration in Medieval Islam

This lecture explores how sea and mainland trade with China was one of the most important aspects of the flourishing of Islam in the Middle Ages.

Who was Edward I?

The Five-Minute Medievalist talks about the life and times of Edward I, King of England.

Medieval Grooming Tools

The Five-Minute Medievalist takes a look at some of the grooming tools from the Middle Ages that she has come across in her travels.

When were the Middle Ages?

The Five-Minute Medievalist answers the question, ‘When were the Middle Ages?’

The Evangelical Pearl: The Last Masterpiece of Medieval Female Mysticism

This paper explores the writings of the anonymous, 16th-century female author of The Evangelical Pearl. Written in the Dutch vernacular and first published in 1537, the work proved to be a popular and influential one.

10 New Youtube Videos for Medieval Lovers – Volume 3

Ten videos recently posted on Youtube for the medievalist’s viewing pleasure!

The Drosten Stone, St Vigeans: A cultural hybrid

The inscriptions on the Drosten Stone have inspired extensive scholarship, but little study has been devoted to the possible meanings behind the Pictish art depicted on the stone.

London Merchants and Their Residences

During the Middle Ages, London was home to one of the largest and richest merchant communities in the world. These men and their families invested heavily in fine architecture both for business and pleasure.

Science and the Future of the Human Past

Michael McCormick discusses how we can discover our ancestors and their lived experience, their successes and failures, and invent a new discipline, the Science of the Human Past.

Wood Culture and Technology in the Greenland Norse Society, 10th-15th Century

Despite a relatively poor wooded environment, well preserved archaeological collections show timbers were often used, suggesting Norse people in Greenland found multiple ways to acquire the wood they needed.

Medieval sunken buildings in the North of France: from samples to micro-features

Thirty years of development of preventative archaeology in France have permitted a renewal of the research into the early medieval period.

Remembrance of things past: recreating the lost world of medieval pilgrimage to St Thomas Becket in Canterbury

This paper discusses the Centre for the Study of Christianity & Culture’s recently completed a three-year AHRC funded research project, ‘Pilgrimage and England’s Cathedrals, past and present’.

Anti-Clericalism in Medieval Persian Poetry

The dominant attitude of the anti-clerical rhetoric in Persian poetry is permeated by criticism of judges, lawyers, aesthetics, spiritual advisors, and authority figures of that nature. This is one of the reasons that makes this poetry still relevant.

Breaking Skin in Early Modern Italy

This paper presents the challenges of representing infirmities, from smallpox to toothache, that involved rupturing the skin posed in Early Modern Europe.

Why is Scotland so often absent in studies of Britain and Europe in the early medieval period?

David Clarke examines the question of why Scotland is so often absent from larger studies of early medieval Europe.

Remembering Winchester’s Medieval Jews: Compromises in Hidden Histories

The history of England’s medieval Jews is significant in its own right, and it is vital to the understanding of the political and social history of the region at the time. However, it has often been marginalised, and frequently overshadowed by other local narratives.

How to get a Nuremberg Chronicle’s Hairstyle

Janet Stephens’s tutorial for creating 15th century look on natural hair, using simple, period appropriate tools and techniques. Based on hairstyles of the Nuremberg Chronicle.

Take a look at the Luttrell Psalter

Watch Facsimile Finder’s video taking us through this fourteenth-century manuscript.

The Soul of Early Irish Monasticism

Not many people are aware that when it comes to Irish religious history, St Patrick only scratches the surface. The island in fact has a rich and fascinating Christian heritage, of which monks and sprawling monastic communities play a central role.

The Sistine Chapel: History and Meaning

The Sistine Chapel in Rome is one of the most famous monuments of the Italian Renaissance. The images which adorn the altar wall of this chapel are so ingrained in our minds and our culture that Michelangelo’s representation of Creation are found throughout popular culture.

How did so many Roman artifacts make it into the Viking Early Middle Ages?

This paper examines the evolution between the periods of antiquity, late-antiquity, and the early Middle Ages through archaeological findings.

Cosmos and Community in Early Medieval Art

Using thrones, tables, mantles, frescoes, and manuscripts, Benjamin Anderson shows how cosmological motifs informed relationships between individuals, especially the ruling elite, and communities.

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