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Archives for February 2018

New game, Kingdom Come: Deliverance, explores life in medieval Bohemia

Released on 13 February, Kingdom Come: Deliverance is an action role-playing game set in the early fifteenth-century Holy Roman Empire that has striven for historically accurate and highly detailed content.

Imagining the Virgin in the Byzantine Night

In the early Byzantine period, the Virgin Mary rose to prominence among Christians – especially in the capital city of Constantinople.

Sephardic Food and Identity in Medieval Spain

This talk explores what foods were recommended by Sephardic authors as part of a healthy and spiritually rewarding lifestyle, as well as how Sephardic cuisine had a prominent place in the literary and cultural imagination of medieval Christian Spaniards.

Slavery, Violence and the Origin of Serfdom in Late Medieval Galicia

This presentation discusses the interrelation between slavery and serfdom in fifteenth-century Galicia (Red Ruthenia).

The painting career of Piero di Cosimo (1462-1522)

The Florentine painter has historically proven to be among the most elusive artists of the Italian Renaissance and yet acted as a seminal figure in the artistic transitions occurring from the close of the fifteenth century.

Sickness, Disability, and Miracle Cures: Hagiography in England, c. 700 – c. 1200

By analysing a selection of miracle-cure narratives from the main period of miracle writing in England, from the age of Bede to the late twelfth century, this project considers the social significance of such stories.

Collection of 3,000 medieval manuscripts now online

After centuries of separation, one of the most valuable collections of manuscripts from the Middle Ages and Early Modern Age – the Bibliotheca Palatina – has been virtually reunited.

Famous Dogs in Medieval Literature

Four famous dogs from medieval literature.

Simon de Montfort and King Henry III: The First Revolution in English History, 1258–1265

The reign of Henry III (1216–1272) was pivotal in English political history. It saw the entrenchment of Magna Carta, the growth of parliament and the widening of political society, as well as England’s first revolution (1258–1265), led by Simon de Montfort, earl of Leicester.

Valhalla Rising: The Construction of Cultural Identity through Norse Myth in Scandinavian and German Pagan Metal

This paper is focused on an intriguing and dynamic stylistic trend in metal culture, which is to use Pagan histories as source of inspiration for the lyrics and images of metal bands.

Fornicating with nuns in fifteenth-century Bologna

In September 1432 Giovanni di Giacomo Amicini, a Bolognese spicer (aromatarius), was prosecuted for abducting a professed sister, Antonia di Baldino da Logliano, from the Convent of the Poor Clares outside the city-gate on the via Santo Stefano.

Serbian scientific institutions and medieval research

Since the beginning of critical historiography, Serbian researchers and historians have dealt with the medieval history of Serbia, Serbian lands, and of its neighboring countries,

“Stand by your man”: Caterina Lupi, wife of Bonifacio. Artistic patronage beyond the deathbed in late medieval Padua

The chance discovery of a document, some years ago led to the conclusion that the initial foundation of the chapel of St. James in Padua was a more complex affair. In this essay, I wish to turn to the most neglected collaborator until now, Caterina di Staggia, wife of Bonifacio.

Islamic Spaces and Diplomacy in Constantinople (Tenth to Thirteenth Centuries C.E.)

This article focuses on the built spaces, often described as mosques, of two Muslim communities in Constantinople between the tenth and thirteenth centuries.

Diplomacy and oriental influence in the court of Cordoba (9th-10th centuries)

This dissertation aims to study the diplomatic relations that Cordoba, as the capital of al-Andalus, kept with the Byzantine, Christian Iberian and Western European courts.

Rabbits and the Specious Origins of Domestication

Rabbits are commonly thought to have been domesticated in c. AD600 by French monks. Using historical and archaeological records, and genetic methods, we demonstrate that this is a misconception.

Monastic Reform and the Geography of Christendom: Experience, Observation and Influence

Historians have suggested that tropes about the desert, solitude, etc., drawn from early texts found their way into mainstream accounts of monastic change in the period c. 1080–1150; this paper challenges this model.

Historical European Martial Art: a crossroad between academic research, martial heritage re-creation and martial sport practices

This paper will propose and discuss, ideas on how to bridge the gap between enthusiasts and scholars; since their embodied knowledge, acquired by practice, is of tremendous value for scientific inquiries and scientific experimentation.

English political refugees at the court of Sveinn Ástríðarson, king of Denmark (1042-76)

After the Norman conquest in 1066 and the failed rebellions in 1069-71, some sections of the aristocracy of Anglo-Saxon England fled as far afield as the Mediterranean, the Crimea, and the Byzantine court. Other crucial members of the Anglo-Saxon elite can be found in exile, somewhat closer to home, in Denmark.

Sumanguru Kante: The King with two Mothers

The recently translated account of The Epic of Sumanguru Kante offers some fascinating stories, including a description of how this West African ruler was born to two mothers.

7 Devious Ways to Defeat a Medieval Army

Could you defeat a medieval army without resorting to a clash of arms? A 10th century Byzantine military manual offers several tricks that could be used to devastate your enemy.

New Medieval Books: From China to Iceland

Five new books taking you throughout the medieval world.

Quiz: The Golden Age of Piracy

Criminals of the sea, desperate sailors or romantic heroes? How much do you really know about pirates?

Quiz: Strange Moments in History

Sometimes fact can be stranger than fiction and history is littered with strange tales of woe, mirth and the bizarre. Can you separate fact from fantasy in these 20 questions?

The Butterfly Lovers: A Classic Chinese Love Story

The earliest written record of the lovers is traced back to about 700AD, when the Tang Dynasty was reigned over by Empress Wu Zetian and was renamed as the (Restored) Zhou Dynasty.

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