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Archives for January 2018

Now and Forever: The Art of Medieval Time – new exhibition comes to the Morgan Library

Drawing upon the rich holdings of the Morgan Library & Museum’s collection of medieval and Renaissance illuminated manuscripts, Now and Forever explores how people told time in the Middle Ages and what they thought about it.

Political and Cultural Relations between Norway and England after the Conquest

What I want to suggest here is that there were important connection between Anglo-Norman England and Scandinavian literature and culture as well, even though the Anglo-Norman kings and writers increasingly looked to the continent for modes of explaining their society.

Is the Bayeux Tapestry coming to Britain?

Reports suggest the Bayeux Tapestry – one of the most famous pieces of medieval art – will be loaned to the British Museum for several months.

Is it medieval or mediaeval?

Why do we have these two spellings, and why has medieval become more popular?

New Medieval Books: The Anglo-Saxon World

Here are five (plus one) new books about Anglo-Saxon England.

How the parrot tricked the knight

In the following story from the late twelfth-century, Alexander Neckham describes how deceitful parrots could be.

Which Medieval Battle Role Would You Be Given?

This test allows you to discover which role on a medieval battlefield you would be given.

Not All Fun and Games: The Dangers of the Medieval Tournament

The tournament, with all its elements of theatre and spectacle, was the ideal showground for martial skill, chivalric values, and medieval masculinity. But, behind the glamour, was a dangerous sport that often involved life or death circumstances.

Women in the Tang Dynasty: Prescribed, dependent and scary

Images from the Tang dynasty 唐朝 (618–907) present us with independent and powerful women, conferring the idea that the Tang dynasty was the one era in Chinese history in which the patriarchal grip was not as tight as during other dynasties.

Venice’s Need for Settling the ‘Byzantine question’ by Conquest: The Fourth Crusade’s Second Siege of Constantinople (early 1204)

This article is a contribution to the ‘diversion debate’ concerning the Fourth Crusade (1202-1204), which argues that ultimately the endangered Venetian commercial interests were at the core of the final decision by the crusade leadership to conquer and take over the Byzantine empire.

Cardinals and the War of Ferrara

The bestowal of a red hat can turn even the most humbly born cleric into an ecclesiastical prince, but whereas few cardinals of the modern era have been born princely, most of those created in the Renaissance period could claim to be of noble lineage.

Linking the Mediterranean: The Construction of Trading Networks in 14th and 15th-century Italy

When the Mediterranean Sea is discussed historically, it is never a simple question of geography. Its meaning remains somewhat indeterminate. It refers to intellectual journeys that do not circumnavigate any one particular region; it indicates periods that splash over.

English Queenship 1445-1503

The Wars of the Roses marked a period of political instability which brought into question existing ideologies of kingship and, within that, of queenship, reshaping the latter office and its rituals.

Herod the Great in Medieval Art and Literature

This thesis follows the treatment of Herod the Great in the art and literature of 1500 years, concentrating especially on the iconographic detail and distinctive literary developments of this paradoxical king of the Jews.

Constructing Communities: Identification and Self-Understanding in the Twelfth-Century North of England

This is a study of local communities in the north of England between 1069 and 1200. It examines the way these communities were constructed, imagined and perceived by contemporary individuals.

‘To Talk of Many Things’: Whales, Walrus, and Seals in Medieval Icelandic Literature

The use of whales, walrus, and seals in the sagas illustrates a cultural map of the ocean. This network of places, known and imagined, is filled in by trade goods, species and place names, and stories that incorporate the denizens of the deep.

A Falconer’s Ritual: A study of the cognitive and spiritual dimensions of pre-Christian Scandinavian falconry

Working from the premise that falconry was introduced in Scandinavia from an eastern origin sometime in the course of the 6th century AD, this paper suggests that the practice may have harboured cognitive and spirituals dimensions unshared by the rest of the feudal, Christian European kingdoms.

Science and the Future of the Human Past

Michael McCormick discusses how we can discover our ancestors and their lived experience, their successes and failures, and invent a new discipline, the Science of the Human Past.

York Minster’s Great East Window restoration completed

On 2 January 2018, the final panel in York Minster’s 600-year-old Great East Window was returned to the world-famous masterpiece, 10 years after all 311 panels were removed by York Glaziers Trust.

Research into Anglo-Saxon burials uncover new insights

Christine Cave, a PhD candidate at the Austrialian National University, has developed a new method for determining the age-of-death for skeletal remains based on how worn the teeth are.

Canterbury Roll now available online

In New Zealand, University of Canterbury staff and students are working to translate and digitise a unique medieval manuscript to make it accessible to the world.

Medieval Castle for Sale in Italy: Torre di Fiume

Located on the border of Tuscany and Umbria, this eleventh-century castle has recently been restored.

Must-see objects at the Bodleian Treasures

This exhibition contains 21 pairs of carefully selected items. Most of these are manuscripts, but there are also a few other objects; together, they feature some of the Bodleian Libraries’ best collections.

The Medieval Magazine: (Volume 3: No. 20): Issue 103: New Year

A behind the scenes look at the British Library’s Harry Potter exhibit, book suggestions for your 2018 Reading List, a closer look at the meaning of the Grail, a troubadour’s famous manuscript, a look at a new Tudor planner, and a review of King John.

New Year, New You: Early Modern Style

While many people may be making new year’s resolutions to get fitter in 2018, Natalie Anderson takes a look at the early modern obsession with achieving the same goal hundreds of years ago.

medievalverse magazine