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Archives for November 2017

Can You Match the Medieval King to Their Cause of Death?

Nine kings, nine causes of death. How well do you know these kings?

More Witches, Monsters, Beasties: A Day at the National Gallery with the London Drawing Group

Part 2 of Minjie Su’s trip to the National Gallery in London.

Cosmos and Community in Early Medieval Art

Using thrones, tables, mantles, frescoes, and manuscripts, Benjamin Anderson shows how cosmological motifs informed relationships between individuals, especially the ruling elite, and communities.

Messengers in Later Medieval England

Varied documents other than Exchequer records expose a terminological confusion in the generic term of ‘messengers’; as a result, the nature of medieval messengership is not easy to approach.

The Dog in the Middle Ages

In my project, I will be looking at the inextricable link between dogs and humans in the Middle Ages, and how dogs had their place among humans, forged relationships with humans, and had their own function in the human world. 

The Bolognese Societates Armatae of the Late 13th Century

The Bologna archives preserve the bye-laws of 24 „armed societies”, dating from between 1230 and the early 1300s, written in good notary Latin. Though known to exist in other Italian city-states, only few non-Bolognese armed society bye-laws are preserved.

Income and working time of a Fencing Master in Bologna in the 15th and early 16th century

Since ancient times, the master-at-arms profession has always been considered essential for the education of the nobility and the common citizenship, especially in the Middle Ages. Yet, we know nothing about the real standard of living of these characters.

The fall of Rome and the retreat of European multiculturalism: A historical trope as a discourse of authority in public debate

This paper examines one recent incident of the use of a highly charged trope of Classical history, the Fall of the Roman Empire, as a discourse of authority in current public debates on western multicultural policies, in relation to the tragic events of the Paris terrorist attacks in Paris in November 2015.

Nutrition and the Early-Medieval Diet

The food supply of the temperate lands of early-medieval western Europe, and the ways in which its peoples dealt with the central problem of feeding themselves, has been subjected to a variety of interpretations in recent years.

The Rhythms of Vengeance in Late Medieval Marseille

Interpersonal violence was common in late medieval Marseille, as it was everywhere in Europe. In the fourteenth century, the city was riven by warfare between two great factions involving some of Marseille’s leading families.

To Clothe a Fool : A Study of the Apparel Appropriate for the European Court Fool 1300 1700

This study endeavors to aid the costumer in search of the historical clothes of the Medieval and Renaissance court Fool.

Mapping Women’s Movement in Medieval England

Women, as a less-dominant group in all periods and most cultures in history, have experienced many forms of spatial limitation.

Mutilation and the Law in Early Medieval Europe and India: A Comparative Study

Such penalties, the rhetoric surrounding their use, and the circumstances in which they were prescribed sound very familiar to a historian of early medieval Europe, where the language and targets of such precepts were similar to those set out in the Indian material.

How well do you know your medieval manuscripts: Beast Mode

You know these manuscripts–most of them would make ‘most famous lists.’ But that means you know them by nickname. Do you also know them by shelfmark?

Witches, Monsters, Beasties: A Day at the National Gallery with the London Drawing Group

Examining five paintings inspired by Greco-Roman myths and medieval lore.

The defensibility of Irish Tower Houses

Recent research carried out at Queen’s University, Belfast has taken a slightly different approach to the study of tower-houses. Instead of looking at the tower as a whole, this study focused on one important feature of the tower-house – the door – crucial to the defence of the tower.

Nature during the Crusades: Physical and psychological affects from the environment in crusader narratives

As the crusaders were highly affected by their religion so also were these encounters with nature interpreted within the religious framework. Therefore, it is interesting to see how the crusaders wrote about these encounters with nature.

The Development of Merchant Identity in Viking-Age and Medieval Scandinavia

What, precisely, did a medieval or premedieval Scandinavian merchant do? What were the expectations placed upon them, and how did they figure into the broader society of the medieval Nordic world?

Mirrors of the World: Alexander Romances and the Fifteenth Century Ottoman Sultanate

The beginning of the fifteenth century offered a narrative link between the Ottoman and Alexandrine historical contexts that has been overlooked thus far.

A Renaissance Instrument to Support Nonprofits: The Sale of Private Chapels in Florentine Churches

The most important nonprofit in Renaissance Florence, the Church had two clear objectives: to address the needs of the parishioners, and to build churches in order to propagate the faith.

Recovering the Histories of Women Religious in England in the Central Middle Ages: Wilton Abbey and Goscelin of Saint-Bertin

Building upon the efforts made by scholars over the past twenty years to enrich our understanding of literary cultures fostered within English communities of women religious during the central Middle Ages, this article offers evidence of these women keeping their communities’ histories and preserving their saints’ cults through their own writing.

Archery in the Preface to Procopius’ Wars: A Figured Image of Agonistic Authorship

This article is a case study in the problems that can arise when a narrow interpretive lens is brought to historical texts by modern historians interested primarily in the facts of military history.

Under the ‘Romans’ or under the Franks? Venice between Two Empires

At the beginning of the ninth century, the Venetian duchy ran the risk of losing the autonomy that it had recently obtained from its former overlords, the Byzantine emperors.

New Medieval Books: Beowulf to da Vinci

Five new books to take you on a journey back into the Middle Ages.

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