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Archives for March 2017

The Armor Network: Medieval Prostheses and Degenerative Posthuman Bodies

By studying depictions of armor in The Canterbury Tales, Le Morte D’Arthur, and The Faerie Queene, and by seeing how these works help us understand the use of medievalism in digital media, we can unravel how armored bodies in Western cultural narratives function as a way to think through the problematics of posthuman transformations.

Pain in Medieval and Modern Contexts

The interplay between Christian religious belief and medicine in the High Middle Ages was complicated.

Changing Places: a comparative discussion of London and Tours in the Early Medieval Period

This paper examines the developmental stages that occurred at two settlements which saw significant changes from the 5th to 12th centuries AD; London and Tours.

How and when Venice became Venice: Framing the urban development of a trading town in Italy

Venice was one of the most important cities in Europe in the late Middle Ages and the Modern era, when it formed an independent state which controlled trade across the Mediterranean and towards the Levant.

The use and the abuse of history, national heritage and nationalism

‘Icelanders or Norwegians? Leifur, Snorri and national identity then and now’ followed by a panel discussion

Divine Vengeance and Human Justice in The Wendish Crusade of 1147

In this study I will focus on the question of whether the Wendish Crusade supports an ‘act of vengeance’ paradigm.

A Medieval Cure for Baldness

Medieval men also worried about losing their hair. They could turn to Hildegard of Bingen to provide them with a cure for baldness.

New Medieval Books: From Anarchy to Archaeology

Five more books that go from early medieval Europe to the Renaissance…

How Much Did It Cost to Build the Great Wall of China?

Admired the world over, the Great Wall of China’s construction came at a cost both in term of finances over the 2,000-year construction period, and in the lives of the military and civilians who built it.

The Oxford map of Palestine in the work of Matthew Paris

He was long-winded, opinionated, cranky, and interested in everything. He moves from politics at court, to the abuses of ecclesiastical power, to foreign relations, to peculiar meteorological and astronomical occurrences, to uncanny incidents.

Friends, Vassals or Foes: Relations and their representations between Frisians and Scandinavians in the Viking Age

‘We paid a visit to the lads of Frisia. And we it was who split the spoils of battle among us.’ – So reads the runic inscription on a silver Viking Age neck-ring found in Senja, Troms County in northern Norway, which is dated to c. 1025.

Carolingian Experiments – 2017 Annual Marco Symposium begins on Friday

The Carolingian era—best known for Emperor Charlemagne, the first Holy Roman Emperor—and its lasting impact on Europe will be the topic of the 14th annual Marco Symposium taking place on March 24–25.

Wolf Hall Continues in York

Historic Barley Hall has announced that it will continue to display six of the most sumptuous costumes from the smash-hit BBC drama for another 12 months by helping to give inspiration to the cast of York Shakespeare Project production of ‘Henry VIII.’

Book Excerpt: Warriors and Kings The 1500-Year Battle For Celtic Britain by Martin Wall

For those of you looking for something Celtic to read this spring, author Martin Wall brings us Warriors and Kings: The 1500-Year Battle for Celtic Britain.

Book Review: Occupying Space in Medieval and Early Modern Britain and Ireland

Our review of ‘Occupying Space in Medieval and Early Modern Britain and Ireland’

Nasty, Brutish and Short: The Lives of Cattle and Sheep in Medieval Finland

For thousands of years, the ancestors of today’s Finncattle and Finnsheep survived on scarce nutrition, but actually starved in the Middle Ages in particular.

New Medieval Books: From News to Games

Five more books for medievalists to take a look at.

Miracle Children: Medieval Hagiography and Childhood Imperfection

Medieval miracle narratives, written to promote the posthumous miraculous activities of saints from their shrines, document the stories of pilgrims seeking intercessory aid.

The Quennells and the ‘History of Everyday Life’ in England, c. 1918–69

The Quennells and the ‘History of Everyday Life’ in England, c. 1918–69 By Laura Carter History Workshop Journal, Issue 81 (2016) Introduction: A new social history developed in mid twentieth-century England, one that has seldom been taken seriously by historiographers of social history. The ‘history of everyday life’ involved disparate threads that are challenging to weave […]

Irish and British saints of the early medieval period

Irish saints tend to be studied en masse.

Early Irish history: the state of the art

Early Irish studies should be engaging with three distinct audiences: these are made up of scholars within the field, medievalists outside of it and the interested public.

The Christian Singer: Charlemagne and Beyond

How did this Gregorian or Frankish-Roman music come into existence?

Local and Global: Medieval Art in an Age of New Nationalisms

In light of recent world events, this talk addresses some of the disciplinary questions about methodology and classification that underlie the study and teaching of medieval art today.

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