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Archives for January 2017

Queen Jadwiga in history and legend: A contribution to the study of the XIV-XV century history of Poland

In spite of its biographic character, this thesis dwells on the various events in the life of the Queen, illustrating essentials of her personality, as well as the posthumous fame which so vividly remained in the tradition, and the present attempts to beatify the Queen.

King Æthelstan in the English, Continental and Scandinavian Traditions of the Tenth to the Thirteenth Centuries

Using close textual analysis, this thesis has identified similarities and differences in the ways in which the Anglo-Saxon king, Æthelstan, is depicted in narrative sources from England, the Continent and Scandinavia during the tenth to the thirteenth centuries

Medieval colophons: A variety of scribal annotations

Though the colophons are not as anarchic as street graffiti tends to be, both can be seen as personal marks. They are examples of people making a note of their existence.

Damaged goods: A photo essay

This essay ultimately shows that while the velvety softness of perfect skin is appealing, getting to know imperfect parchment is in the end more interesting and rewarding for the historian of the medieval book.

Priest as Criminal: Community Regulation of Priests in the Archdeaconry of Paris, 1483-1505

This dissertation examines accusations of criminal behavior levied against priests in the archdeaconry of Paris from 1483 – 1505.

Crenellations: Crowning Castles

Crenellations are one of the most recognizable elements of a medieval castle. These upright projections resemble teeth, bared at invaders to prevent their attempted entries and at allies to show the owner’s strength. Each upright section is called a merlon or crenel, and they protected defenders from attacks. Defenses could be further increased by the […]

The 
Privileging
 of 
Visio
 over
 Vox 
in
 the 
Mystical
 Experiences
 of
 Hildegard 
of 
Bingen 
and
 Joan
 of
 Arc

Even
 though
 medieval
 women
 mystics
 have
 enjoyed
 increased
 attention
 in
 recent
 scholarly
 discussion, 
a
 topic
 that
 still
 has
 not
 been
 tackled
 is
 the
 possible
 difference
 between
 seeing
 a
 vision
 and
 hearing
 a
 voice
 during
 a
 mystical
 experience
 and
 the
 ramifications
 of
 this
 difference 
in
 the
 context 
of
 medieval
 text 
production
 and 
in
 the
 status
 of
 mystics
 as
 authors.


The Impact of the White Ship Disaster

An in-depth look at the White Ship disaster of 1120 and the impact it had on English succession.

Watchful Warriors on Viking-Age Sculpture

Watchful Warriors on Viking-Age Sculpture Lecture by Howard Williams Given at the University College Isle of Man on December 14, 2016 Almost every book about the Vikings includes photographs of warriors found on early medieval carved stones from Britain, Ireland and the Isle of Man. How do we interpret these images? Why were figures with […]

The Vikings in Orkney

In recent years, it has been suggested that the first permanent Scandinavian presence in Orkney was not the result of forcible land-taking by Vikings, but came about instead through gradual penetration

Discovery of Lost Early Medieval Kingdom in Galloway

Archaeological research has just been published which reveals the location of a hitherto lost early medieval kingdom that was once pre-eminent in Scotland and Northern England.

Dressed up with bling stolen in Viking raids

When a female Norwegian Viking died some time during the ninth century, she was buried wearing a status symbol: a beautiful piece of bronze jewellery worn on her traditional Norse dress.

Major Viking Age manor discovered in Sweden

Birka, Sweden’s oldest town, has long been a major source of our knowledge about the Viking Age. New geophysical research has now uncovered the ninth-century manor of a royal bailiff at this site.

British Museum acquires medieval alabaster Virgin and Child

The British Museum has acquired an outstanding 14th Century English alabaster figure of the Virgin and Child which is the best-preserved of its kind on display in a UK national collection.

The Golden Haggadah now online

The Golden Haggadah, created in Catalonia around the year 1320, is among several hundred items that have recently been digitised by the British Library as part of the Hebrew Manuscripts Digitisation Project. The project has involved the photographing, description and, where necessary, meticulous conservation of 1,300 items ranging from illuminated service books to Torah scrolls, […]

Identification, Geochemical Characterisation and Significance of Bitumen among the Grave Goods of the 7th Century Mound 1 Ship-Burial at Sutton Hoo (Suffolk, UK)

The 7th century ship-burial at Sutton Hoo is famous for the spectacular treasure discovered when it was first excavated in 1939.

A Family of Mercers in Medieval London

A fourteenth century family coordinating elements of English life, the academy, the church, the crown, land, commerce and family connections to become significant participants in London life.

The Tower-House Castle: Not Exactly Fit for a King

House, Tower, Castle. It’s like a weird hand of Cards Against Humanity or Apples to Apples but these special types of castles are common in Scotland and Ireland. The 13th century concentric castles of Edward I, a.k.a. Longshanks, a.k.a. Hammer of the Scots, are some of the most well-known surviving medieval structures. His castles are […]

‘As If Augustine Had Said’: Textual Interpretation and Augustinian Ambiguity in a Medieval Debate on Predestination

This paper reevaluates a sample of Hincmar’s writings in the 840s and 850s to argue that he sought to make explicit what Augustine had left unclear regarding predestination by appealing to common standards of orthodoxy in the forms of additional patristic authors, conciliar judgments, and liturgical practices.

The Scapegoat: Impotence and Witchcraft in the Middle Ages

This essay investigates the question of how women were used as scapegoats for male impotence during the Witch Craze.

Monstrous Muslims? Depicting Muslims in French Illuminated Manuscripts from 1200-1420

This paper examines depictions of Muslims in illuminated manuscripts produced in France between 1200-1420 that feature images of Christian-Muslim interactions.

13th century skeleton discovered with oldest known form of maternal infection

By Michelle Donovan The 800-year-old skeleton of a young woman buried in a graveyard on the outskirts of the fabled city of Troy is yielding new insights into the evolution of bacterial infections and maternal health. Researchers at the University of McMaster’s Ancient DNA Centre and the University of Wisconsin-Madison have sequenced the complete genomes […]

The Concept of a Boundary Between the Latin and the Byzantine Civilizations of Europe

This boundary runs from the Barents Sea in the north to the Adriatic Sea in the south. On its western side nations are associated with the Latin legacy, while on the eastern side are those that relate to the Byzantine tradition and later on, to Moscow.

The Medieval Magazine: #Engaging the Medieval (Volume 3 Issue 1)

New Year, New You? Kicking off the first issue of 2017 with a look at how we as historians, scholars and the general public, engage with history.

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