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Archives for January 2016

Civic Knighthood in the Early Renaissance: Leonardo Bruni’s De militia (ca. 1420)

Leonardo Bruni’s aim in the De militia (ca. 1420) was to co-opt the most glamorous of medieval ideals, the ideal of chivalry, and to reinterpret it in terms of Greco-Roman ideals of military service.

Sir Gawain Gets an 80s Reboot: The Sword of the Valiant Movie Review

This week, we have the retelling of the epic Arthurian romance of Sir Gawain and the Green Knight in this 1984 fantasy reboot.

Five Things Medieval People Would Hate About the Modern World

Although a medieval person vacationing in the twenty-first century would no doubt be overjoyed at things like electricity, modern transportation, and flushing toilets, there are a lot of things they probably wouldn’t appreciate about our time.

Berserkir: a re-examination of the phenomenon in literature and life

This thesis discusses whether berserkir really went berserk.

Good Dog/Bad Dog: Dogs in Medieval Religious Polemics

From its positive attributes, the dog became a Christian symbol for conscientious prelates and preachers who guarded the community from the devil and applied the dog’s curative properties to heal the community of sin.

The Ten Commandments in the Medieval Schools

There was surprisingly little discussion of the ten commandments in the period between Augustine of Hippo (d. 430) and the schools that grew up in twelfth-century Paris, which specialised in teaching the Bible and theology.

Textile Consumption in Late Medieval Castile: The Social, Economic, and Cultural Meaning of Clothing, 1200-1350

Focusing on the types of clothing imported into the realm, and using information from the royal accounts and tithes of a number of ports in the Bay of Biscay, I focus on issues of production and consumption in late medieval Castile and what this information tells us about the economic structures of the realm and on the exaggerated consumption of foreign cloth by certain groups within Castilian society.

God is Great, God is Good: Medieval Conceptions of Divine Goodness and the Problem of Hell

Medieval views of both divine goodness and the doctrine of hell are examined and shown to be incompatible with our best understandings of goodness. The only manner in which God could be good to those in hell – by permitting their continued existence – is not sufficient to outweigh ‘the dreadful pains of eternal fire’.

Exploring Legal Multiculturalism in the Irish Sea

This thesis explores the relationship between proto-democracy, multiculturalism, and state formation. In the introduction, I express the desire to ascertain how legal multiculturalism on the Isle of Man could be viewed as a product of the shared protodemocratic character of the Irish and the Norse legal traditions.

Magna Carta, the Rule of Law, and the Limits on Government

This paper surveys the legal tradition that links Magna Carta with the modern concepts of the rule of law and the limits on government.

The Law is an Ass: Reading E.P. Evans’ The Medieval Prosecution and Capital Punishment of Animals

In this essay I address a little-known chapter in the lengthy history of crimes against (nonhuman) animals. My focus is not crimes committed by humans against animals, as such, but a practical outcome of the seemingly bizarre belief that animals are capable of committing crimes against humans

Justice Fred Blume and the Translation of Justinian’s Code

Justice Frederick H. Blume, attorney and long-time Justice of the Wyoming Supreme Court, single-handedly translated Justinian’s Code and Novels in the early twentieth century. His is the only English translation of the Code to have been made from the Latin version accepted as most authoritative.

Five Medieval Toothpaste Recipes

Need advice on how to keep your teeth clean and shiny white? Medieval writers have got you covered!

The Law of Treason in the English Border Counties in the Later Middle Ages

The formulation of a general and comprehensive law of treason by the English government in the mid-fourteenth century allowed northerners to impose harsh penalties on those who offended them most grievously.

Concerning Mass Graves: The use, development and identities within mass graves during the Scandinavian Iron Age and Middle Ages

In this Master thesis, my aim is to investigate, compare and discuss the practice of dealing with the dead and their war gear during the aftermath of a battle or an armed engagement.

Traversing the Globe through Illuminated Manuscripts at The Getty

Traversing the Globe through Illuminated Manuscripts, on view January 26–June 26, 2016 at the J. Paul Getty Museum at the Getty Center, offers the opportunity to explore the strong connections between Europe and the broader world during the Middle Ages and Renaissance.

The Medieval Magazine: Law and Justice (Issue 52)

This week we take a look at ten milestones in medieval law and tell the case of a corrupt archbishop. You can also get five recipes for medieval toothpaste, and 23 uses for rosemary.

Institutionally Constrained Technology Adoption: Resolving the Longbow Puzzle

Historians have long puzzled over why this missile weapon—clearly superior to its alternative, the crossbow—was monopolized by the English for so long

A Forgettable Fantasy Film: The Four Warriors

Another weekend, another medieval movie! This week, I review “The Four Warriors”.

Kindred of the Sea – Young Adult Fiction series about the Vikings

These three novels in the series Kindred of the Sea, by C.J. Adrien, are aimed at a young adult/teen audience

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