Archives for August 2015

The Medieval Magazine – Issue 31

This week’s issue of The Medieval Magazine takes a look at Christianity in the Middle Ages.

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Thank you for buying The Medieval Magazine, Issue 6

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Thank you for buying The Medieval Magazine, No.31

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Teaching Historical Theory through Video Games

The potential of video games for teaching history is receiving increasing recognition. However, the greatest emphasis is on their use as tools in secondary education. The few studies focusing on undergraduate education demonstrate the use of games to create an immersive historical experience with counterfactual options.

Free online course on the Battle of Agincourt begins in October

One of the leading experts on the famous Battle of Agincourt will be part of a free online course that begins on October 19th.

Fireworks in Scotland date back to 1507, researchers find

Previously experts believed that fireworks were first used in Stirling in 1566, however, new evidence suggests that it was actually around 59 years earlier and in the Scottish capital. It is thought that ‘fireballs’ featured in a great tournament staged by King James lV, which took place at the base of Castle Rock, in 1507, in the area which is now the King’s Stables Road.

Consider the Source

I followed the link I was given and found a website that goes on and on about how brutal the medieval justice system was (with gory examples of limb-lopping and eyeball-gouging), and that people lived in fear of becoming the next victim of it. That’s when I started to get upset.

How Hagia Sophia was Built

Stories and legends from the Patria on how the greatest church of the Byzantine world was built

Simply Walking into Mordor: How Much Lembas Would The Fellowship Need?

The Fellowship of the Ring were supposed to travel from Imraldis to the forges of Mt. Doom in order to destroy the One Ring of Sauron.

Medieval Queens and Queenship: the Present Status of Research in Income and Power

This paper presents some thoughts and conclusions on the state of a multidisciplinary field of Medieval Studies, queens and queenship, concentrating mainly on issues of income and power.

Last Laughs: Torture in Medieval Icelandic Literature

Medieval Icelandic literature is full of violence, calculated and reasoned violence, narrated in such a way as to focus largely on issues of personal honor and justice, less so on the spectacle of blood so common in the modem Hollywood action film.

Literature in an Apocalyptic Age; or, How to End a Romance

No literature of the Middle Ages has so successfully captured the imagination of recent times as has the medieval romance.

Secret Gestures and Silent Revelations: The Disclosure of Secrets in Selected Arthurian Illuminated Manuscripts and Arthurian Films

This paper explores visual language and iconic systems central to the representation of the Arthurian cycle in thirteenth and fifteenth century Gothic illuminated manuscripts and in two Arthurian films; its focus is the theme of courtly love and crucial revelations of the secret or hidden.

Machiavelli and Botticelli Movies to Hit the Screen in 2016

Machiavelli and Botticelli are set to hit screens in 2016. We sat down to chat with Italian director, Lorenzo Raveggi about his two ambitious projects.

Movie Review: Dangerous Beauty

Late 16th century Venice, where a woman can be a nun, a wife or a courtesan. For Veronica Franco, the free spirited girl scorned by because of her lack of wealth, the choice is an obvious one…

The Justinianic Reconquest of Italy: Imperial Campaigns and Local Responses

This article examines a particular aspect of Justinian’s campaigns against the Ostrogoths in Italy, one that is often overlooked, yet one that is essential to the understanding of these wars

Malory’s Arthur and the Politics of Chivalry

The jury is back and the verdict is in. In Thomas Malory’s Le Morte Darthur, a major reason the Round Table falls is that its political apparatus and the chivalric ethos in which that apparatus is grounded are inadequate for maintaining a stable kingdom.

The Newport Medieval Ship in Context: The Life and Times of a 15th Century Merchant Vessel Trading in Western Europe

This paper presents a summary of recent research into the broader economic, cultural and political world in which the Newport Medieval Ship was built and operated.

Senses of the Past: The Old English Vocabulary of History

How did the Anglo-Saxons think about history?

Bucks County Museum looking to acquire Lenborough Coin Hoard

Late last year, over 5200 silver coins was found by a metal detectorist in England. Now, the public will get a taste of this hoard, when 21 coins go on a special exhibit at at Bucks County Museum.

Reporting Scotland in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle

The aim of this paper is to explore the changing way in which the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle reports events in northern Britain, beyond the Anglo-Saxon territories, in the hope of gaining a better understanding both of events in that region and, perhaps more interestingly, the way in which the Chronicle was constructed.

Financing the tribute to the Kingdom of Jerusalem: An urban tax in Damascus

After a brief introduction to legal taxation and Saljuq fiscal policy, the philological problems in the definition of a specific due, al-fissa, illegitimate according to the sharia, will be addressed along with its political function and history. This due was levied in Damascus for the tribute to the Kingdom of Jerusalem.

Demon Possession in Anglo‐Saxon and Early Modern England: Continuity and Evolution in Social Context

Sometime between around 687 and 700, a distraught father brought his raving son, in a wagon, to the island of Lindisfarne, where the holy relics of Saint Cuthbert were kept.

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