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Environs and hinterland: Cologne and Nuremberg in the later middle ages

Environs and hinterland: Cologne and Nuremberg in the later middle ages

By Herbert Eiden and Franz Irsigler

Trade, Urban Hinterlands and Market Integration c.1300-1600, edited by James A. Galloway (CMH, 2000)

Introduction: Pursuing the question of economic development and its spatial articulation with reference to the two most important German cities and their hinterlands during the transition from the middle ages to the early modern period is a double-edged venture. On the one hand, it is a rewarding task because both cities have received and still receive intense scholarly attention. On the other hand, due to the sheer amount of information available, it is impossible to give a full account of the economic development of both cities. Therefore we have to confine ourselves to specific examples of the economic driving-forces. Let us begin, however, with a few methodological remarks. The basic notion of the town as a central place is the paradigm that has shaped research on urban history for the last thirty years.

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