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The vita of Douceline de Digne (1214-1274): Beguine spirituality and orthodoxy in thirteenth century Marseilles

The vita of Douceline de Digne (1214-1274): Beguine spirituality and orthodoxy in thirteenth century Marseilles

By Kelly Lynn Morris

Master’s Thesis, University of Calgary, 2001

Abstract: In the 1240s, Douceline de Digne, sister of Franciscan Hugues de Digne, founded two beguinages in Provence that espoused charitable works, collectively known as the House of Roubaud. For herself, the role of founder and spiritual mother of lay religious women included a commitment to the ideals of active charity and absolute poverty. This thesis addresses two inter-related issues. Firstly, from Douceline’s vita, we can argue that her expressions of evangelical charity and absolute poverty were an orthodox reflection of a composite of Franciscan, beguinai, and mystic spiritual ideals. The second issue challenges Aviad Kleinberg’s evaluation of Douceline as a conscious agent in the creation and manipulation of her own sanctity by demonstrating that the development of Douceline’s orthodox sanctity was based upon a co-operative commitment by the community to create a lifestyle that embodied active charity.

Click here to read this thesis from the University of Calgary

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