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Call for Papers: Does Mead Maketh Mede? Medieval Food Taboos and Food Hierarchies

Does Mead Maketh Mede? Medieval Food Taboos and Food Hierarchies

2012 International Congress on Medieval Studies

Call for Papers: In the late fourteenth-century, contemporary chroniclers such as Langland and Gower noted the specific food hierarchies of the feudal system. Within the city limits, strict regulations determined the locales for some food preparations such as butchery or tanning. Medieval men and women who disobeyed Lenten prohibitions of meat could face stiff penalties. Food taboos differed among the three predominant medieval religions — Christianity, Judiasm, and Islam. In his homilies and colloquy, the Anglo-Saxon monk Aelfric discusses several food taboos of the Old Testament. How did these taboos and hierarchies affect the individuals who fell under their rubrics? How did medieval men and women define themselves by the adherence to or departure from the acceptable standards?

Please submit abstracts of 200 words and contact information to the email listed below. Abstracts are due by September 15.

Tanya Anderson Hooper
University of North Texas, Ph.D. candidate
tanyahooper@gmail.com

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