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Archives for July 2011

Medieval North European Spindles and Whorls

This document discusses spindle whorls and shafts found throughout the areas Scandinavians lived in during the Middle Ages (800-1500 CE).

The Turks with the Grand Catalan Company, 1305-1312

The campaigns of a band of Spanish mercenary soldiers, under the terrifying Roger de Flor, in the Byzantine lands of the early fourteenth century are fully documented by medieval and contemporary historians.

Sex and the single saint physicality in Anglo-Saxon female saints’ lives

This study examines the treatment of the female body in several Anglo-Saxon saints’ lives.

Historical Fencing Footwear: “What shoes to train in?” Ask instead, what did Medieval and Renaissance fighters wear?

Historical Fencing Footwear: “What shoes to train in?” Ask instead, what did Medieval and Renaissance fighters wear? Clements, John ARMA, The Association of Medieval and Renaissance Martial Arts Abstract Footwear is important. It directly affects how you move and what kinds of motions you can perform. Since the footwork of Renaissance martial arts is particular, and […]

Ecclesiastical Politics as Reflected in the Mural Paintings of San Pietro al Monte at Civate

Ecclesiastical Politics as Reflected in the Mural Paintings of San Pietro al Monte at Civate By Naomi Meiri-Dann Assaph – Studies in Art History, Vol.6 (2001) Introduction: The church of San Pietro al Monte Pedale sopra Civate (Lecco, Lombardy) stands on the slopes of Monte Pedale, high above the village of Civate, and can only […]

The origin of the European “Medieval Warm Period”

The origin of the European “Medieval Warm Period” By H. Goosse, O. Arzel, J. Luterbacher, M. E. Mann, H. Renssen, N. Riedwyl, A. Timmermann, E. Xoplaki, and H.Wanner Climate of the Past, Vol.2 (2006) Abstract: Proxy records and results of a three dimensional climate model show that European summer temperatures roughly a millennium ago were […]

Bones of Contention: The Justifications for Relic Thefts in the Middle Ages

As the devotion to relics grew, so did the theft of these prized relics. The popularity of relic thefts peaked in Western Europe during the ninth, tenth, and eleventh centuries.

Nicholas of Cusa’s Intellectual Relationship to Anselm of Canterbury

Nicholas of Cusa’s Intellectual Relationship to Anselm of Canterbury Hopkins, Jasper The Catholic University of America Press, Washington, D.C. (2006) Abstract During this sexcentenary of the birth of Nicholas of Cusa, there is an almost ineluctable temptation to super-accentuate Cusa’s modernity—to recall approvingly, for example, that the Neokantian Ernst Cassirer not only designated Cusa “the […]

Dialectical Heroes: Robin Hood and King Arthur Across Time, Genre and Politics

Dialectical Heroes: Robin Hood and King Arthur Across Time, Genre and Politics By Stephen Knight Research Papers in the Humanities No.6 (2007) Introduction: Initial reflection on Robin Hood and King Arthur suggests that they fulfil the most opposite, even unrelated form of dialecticality. Robin represents resistance to bad authority, Arthur represents good authority under fatal […]

Horses and Crossbows: Two Important Warfare Advantages of the Teutonic Order in Prussia

The combination of these two developments made it possible for the Order’s garrisons to withstand long sieges, provided they had sufficient supplies of food, weapons and crossbow bolts.

“Our father has won a great victory”: the authorship of Berenguela’s account of the battle of Las Navas de Tolosa, 1212

“Our father has won a great victory”: the authorship of Berenguela’s account of the battle of Las Navas de Tolosa, 1212 By Theresa M. Vann Journal of Medieval Iberian Studies, Volume 3, Issue 1 (2011) Abstract: Scholars studying the letter of Berenguela to Blanche of Castile describing Alfonso VIII’s victory at the battle of Las […]

French Connections: The Significance of the Fleurs-de-Lis in the Mosaic of King Roger II of Sicily in the Church of Santa Maria dell’Ammiraglio, Palermo

French Connections: The Significance of the Fleurs-de-Lis in the Mosaic of King Roger II of Sicily in the Church of Santa Maria dell’Ammiraglio, Palermo By Dawn Marie Hayes Paper given at the 46th International Medieval Congress, Kalamazoo (2011) Introduction: The focus of my paper is the image before you, a mosaic of Christ crowning King […]

Byzantium and the Crusades

Articles about the Byzantine empire and the Crusades: Expeditio persica of Heraclius: Holy War or Crusade?, by Nicola Bergamo The Treaty of Devol (1108) as an Example of the Byzantine Policy of “Divide and Rule”, by Azat Bozoyan “The End Followed In No Long Time”: Byzantine Diplomacy And The Decline In Relations With The West […]

Crusading in the Later Middle Ages (14th – 16th centuries)

List of articles about crusading in the Later Middle Ages: Writing and Imagining the Crusade in Fifteenth-Century Burgundy: The Case of the Expedition Narrative in Jean de Wavrin’s Anciennes Chroniques d’Angleterre, by Robert Byron Joseph Desjardins How One Fourteenth-Century Venetian Remembered the Crusades: The Maps and Memories of Marino Sanuto, by Julia Harte The Turk as […]

Crusades and Crusading in the Thirteenth Century

Articles about the Crusades in the Middle East during the 13th century, and the fall of the Crusader States by 1291: Legitimizing a low-born, regicide monarch. The case of the Mamluk sultan Baybars and the Ilkhans in the 13th century, by Denise Aigle The Letters of Eljigidei, Hülegü, and Abaqa: Mongol Overtures or Christian Ventriloquism?, […]

The Crusader States in the Twelfth Century

Alice of Antioch and the rebellion against Fulk of Anjou, by Adriana R. de Almeida Frontier Warfare in the Latin Kingdom of Jerusalem: The Campaign of Jacob’s Ford, 1178-79, by Malcolm Barber Forgetting Osama bin Munqidh, Remembering Osama bin Laden: The Crusades in Modern Muslim Memory, by Umej Bhatia The Treaty of Devol (1108) as […]

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