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Some general hypoteses on English Medieval peasant house construction from the 7th to the 17th centuries

Some general hypoteses on English Medieval peasant house construction from the 7th to the 17th centuries

By Stuart Wrathmell

Ruralia, Vol.4 (2001)

Introduction: For three decades, from the mid-1950s until the mid-1980s, the archaeologists who dug rural settlement sites were in broad agreement as to the character and durability of medieval peasant houses. Such houses were built to last a generation or so, their impermanence marked by the insubstantial and frequently rebuilt wall foundations recorded in the excavations of deserted medieval villages. In the words of John Hurst: “The main problem at the moment is that the results of medieval excavation and the study of vernacular architecture (of the surviving traditional buildings that varied in construction methods and materials from region to region) show two quite different worlds.

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