Advertisement

Archives for June 2011

Medieval Identity: A Sign and a Concept

In the two centuries following the turn of the first millennium, literate individuals in Western Europe rarely if ever resorted to mediated expression, to indirect communication by means of the written word, without expressing some sense of the absence of immediacy, that is, of personal presence.

New Byzantine and Roman galleries open at the Royal Ontario Museum

The Royal Ontario Museum (ROM) in Toronto, Canada will be opening a new set of permanent galleries tomorrow that will showcase its impressive collection of artifacts from the ancient civilizations of Rome, Byzantium and Nubia. Highlights of the collection include an exceptionally rare Byzantine ciborium (altar canopy) dated to AD 550, a gladiator’s helmet that […]

Illness without doctors: medieval systems of healthcare in Scotland

When most common folk fell ill they consulted a local healer, either a man (‘cunning man’), but more usually a woman (‘cunning woman’), with a practical knowledge of medicinal herbs, magical amulets and charms

The Feudal Revolution and Europe’s Rise: Institutional Divergence in the Christian and Muslim Worlds before 1500 CE

The Feudal Revolution and Europe’s Rise: Institutional Divergence in the Christian and Muslim Worlds before 1500 CE By Lisa Blaydes and Eric Chaney Published Online (2011) Abstract: This paper investigates the political origins of Europe’s economic rise by examining the emergence of increasing ruler durability in Western Europe when compared with the Islamic world. While […]

The Struggle Between Osman Gazi and The Byzantines For Nicaea

The Struggle Between Osman Gazi and The Byzantines For Nicaea By Halil Inalcik Iznik Throughout History, ed. H. Inalcik (Istanbul, 2003) Introduction: The Byzantine Empire was forced to turn over all of Anatolia to the Turkish invaders within the twenty-five years following 1071. Suleymansah established the Anatolian Seljukid Sultanate in Nicaea (Iznik) in 1087. Following […]

Medieval scholars to work at the Getty Research Institute

Two medievalists are among a group of scholars who will be part of the Getty Research this September. Heidi Gearhart, who recently earned her PhD at the University of Michigan, and Cristiana Pasqualetti, Assistant Professor at the Università degli Studi dell’Aquila in Italy, join 46 other scholars who received Getty residential scholar grants during the […]

The Norman episcopate, 989-1110

The Norman episcopate, 989-1110 By Richard Allen PhD thesis, University of Glasgow, 2009 Abstract: The episcopal office, and the individuals who held it, were fundamental to the political, religious, social and cultural development of ducal Normandy. Not only men of great political power, many strove to create vibrant centres of learning in their dioceses, and […]

Guilty Pleasures: Luxury In Ancient Greece And The Medieval World

For some, it’s about fine wines, penthouses, exclusive clubs and designer clothes. For others, it can be as simple as settling down for the afternoon with a good book. Now a two-part BBC miniseries, presented by Cambridge University academic Dr Michael Scott, is to reveal how the ambiguous meaning of luxury is the very thing […]

A Tale of Two Wonderworkers: St. Nicholas of Myra in the Writings and Life of St. Thomas Aquinas

One subject that has never been closely investigated is the saint’s relationship to another famous saint, Nicholas of Myra, on whose feast in 1273 Thomas experienced the mystical vision that led to the definitive cessation of his writings.

Medieval advice to pregnant mothers: don’t drink water, have wine instead

Medieval medical opinion believed that foods could play an important role in the health and behaviour of people – certain kinds of foods, if eaten too much, could cause illness or cause a person to become depressed or melancholy.

A Viking Slave’s Saga

A Viking Slave’s Saga By Jan Fridegård, translated by Robert E. Bjork Arizona Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, 2007 ISBN: 978-0-86698-375-4 ACMRS Occasional Publications Series, Volume 4 A Viking Slave’s Saga is a trilogy of novels by the famous Swedish author Jan Fridegård: Land of Wooden Gods (Trägudars land, 1940), People of the Dawn […]

The medieval blacksmith and his products

The medieval blacksmith and his products By Ian H. Goodall Medieval Industry, edited by D.W. Crossley (London: Council for British Archaeology, 1981) Introduction: The medieval blacksmith produced the many tools and fittings used in everyday life, as well as more specialized items such as church doors and screens, weapons, and armour. These specialist classes are […]

Early Prints Depicting Eyeglasses

Early Prints Depicting Eyeglasses Letocha, Charles E. , MD; Dreyfus, John , MA(Cantab) ARCH OPHTHALMOL/VOL 120, (NOV 2002) In Europe, the use of paper and of xylography (printing from woodcuts) began in the last quarter of the 14th century. Such woodcuts were reproduced by inking the surface on which the images were cut and then transferring the […]

AN ENQUIRY INTO THE CHARGES AND MOTIVATIONS OF THE CAPETIAN MONARCHY BEHIND INSTITUTING THE FALL OF THE ORDER OF THE TEMPLE

AN ENQUIRY INTO THE CHARGES AND MOTIVATIONS OF THE CAPETIAN MONARCHY BEHINDINSTITUTING THE FALL OF THE ORDER OF THE TEMPLE Singhal, Chetan The Concord Review, Vol. 21:4 (2011) Abstract The Templars were a religious military Order, founded in the Holy Land in 1119. During the 12th and 13th centuries they acquired extensive property both in the crusader […]

Ethics and poetics: the architectural vision of Saint Francis of Assisi

Ethics and poetics: the architectural vision of Saint Francis of Assisi Caicco, Gregory Paul (McGill University) Phd Philosophy Thesis, McGill University (1998) Abstract Contrary to the view of many interpreters that Francis of Assisi (1181–1226) dabbled in church renovation for a few years following his first conversion experience in 1205, architecture remained a central preoccupation […]

Viking Fashions were provocative, historian finds

Vivid colors, flowing silk ribbons, and glittering bits of mirrors – the Vikings dressed with considerably more panache than we previously thought. The men were especially vain, and the women dressed provocatively, but with the advent of Christianity, fashions changed, according to Swedish archeologist Annika Larsson. “They combined oriental features with Nordic styles. Their clothing […]

Insult and Redress in Cyfraith Hywel Dda and Welsh Arthurian Romance

Insult and Redress in Cyfraith Hywel Dda and Welsh Arthurian Romance Cichon, Michael Arthuriana, Vol. 10:3 (2000) Abstract This article, treating the laws in their context as well as specific legal references in the Romances, examines the transactional nature of insult and redress as portrayed in medieval Welsh law and literature. The laws contain commentary […]

medievalverse magazine
WordPress Security