Advertisement

Archives for April 2011

Battle of Nations – Historical Reenactment Tournament

The second international festival on historical reenactment “Battle of Nations” is taking place at the Khotyn Fortress in western Ukraine on April 30th to May 3rd. Medievalists.net is pleased to be able to offer live-streaming of this event. The first festival which was held in 2010 at the Khotyn Fortress has gained popularity among foreign […]

The Far East in the Early 16th Century: Giovanni da Empoli’s Travels

There have been many studies on the impact of the Portuguese discoveries on Europe, and as a result, new perspectives and approaches to the subject have opened up.

Political Pilgrimage in Later Medieval Central Europe: a Case Study of a Hungarian Traveller to Ireland

Political pilgrimage was a means of diplomacy in the medieval era. This study aims to illustrate the political character of the pilgrimage of a Hungarian aristocrat, Lőrinc Tari, a member of the government of Sigismund of Luxemburg, King of Hungary, to St. Patrick’s Purgatory in Ireland, which is unique in contemporary Continental pilgrimages.

An Embarrassing Legacy and a Booty of Luxury: Christian Attitudes towards Islamic Art and Architecture in the Medieval Kingdom of Valencia

From the study of the art and architecture in the kingdom of Valencia (1232- 1500), we have come to the conclusion that ethnic and religious differences were not the most relevant factors in the filtering of artistic exchange and assigning new functions to forms, objects or techniques.

Rituals on the Road: Two highways at Rome and Ravenna AD 400- 750

This study will analyse rituals on the Via Tiburtina, and their impact on the bid for power in late antique Rome.

Dogs in graves – a question of symbolism?

A 9th century female boat-grave is the starting point for a discussion about dogs in Scandinavian graves from c. 500-1100 AD.

A Re-assessment of the Use of Building Accounts for the Study of Medieval Urban Houses

This paper will evaluate the use of building accounts as a source for medieval construction.

Robin Hood, Sherwood Forest and the Sheriff of Nottingham

This piece, as befits a journal of medieval studies, focuses on the earliest known versions of the stories of Robin Hood. It does not consider the manifestations of Robin Hood after the Reformation, let alone his resuscitation in Music Hall, Film and Television in the last century and more.

Taking measures across the medieval landscape: aspects of urban design before the Renaissance

Taking measures across the medieval landscape: aspects of urban design before the Renaissance By Keith D. Lilley Urban Morphology, Vol.2:2 (1998) Abstract: This paper considers the significance of geometrical knowledge and the role of surveying as influences on medieval town plans in Europe. Analyses of selected plans show signs that improvements in methods of measurement […]

British Museum to host “Treasures of Heaven: Saints, Relic and Devotion in Medieval Europe”

The British Museum’s major summer exhibition explores the spiritual and artistic significance of Christian relics and reliquaries in medieval Europe. Featuring some of the finest sacred treasures of the medieval age, Treasures of Heaven: saints, relics and devotion in medieval Europe will give visitors the opportunity to see objects from more than forty institutions, many […]

Guy Gavriel Kay to do online Q&A on May 3rd

The bestselling author Guy Gavriel Kay will be taking questions online at a special web Q&A on Tuesday, May 3rd. The event will promote the release of Under Heaven in paperback. The one-hour event (2pm-3pm EDT) will have Guy using a new online conversation technology from PollStream called OneRoom. Kay tells Medievalists.net “the Pollstream/OneRoom model […]

Maximilian and Astrology

Maximilian and Astrology By Darin Hayton Published Online – Draft chapter for the forthcoming book Nature, Knowledge, and Politics in the Holy Roman Empire (2009) Introduction: From the earliest years of his life Emperor Maximilian I was surrounded by astrologers and their interpretations of the natural world. Shortly after Maximilian’s birth on 22 March 1459, Emperor […]

Parochialization and patterns of patronage in 11th-century Sussex

Parochialization and patterns of patronage in 11th-century Sussex By Neil S. Rushton Sussex Archaeological Collections, Vol. 137 (1999) Abstract: The 11th century was a crucial period for the formation of the parochial system in England. The old minster parochiae were being broken up and their rights encroached upon by an increasing number of new churches, […]

The Order of Saint Lazarus in the Kingdom of Jerusalem

The Order of Saint Lazarus in the Kingdom of Jerusalem By C. Savona-Ventura Journal of the Monastic Military Orders, Vol.1 (2008) Introduction: The history of all the Military Orders which saw their origins during the Crusader period are shrouded in a haze of reality and myth. Much of the myth stems from the fact that […]

The Werewolf in Medieval Icelandic Literature

In northern regions much prominence is given to two kinds of shape-shifting: the ability to change into either a bear or a wolf, although the latter seems to have been more popular.

Is there a core moral code to all Arthurian narrative?

The knightly code of conduct prizes public virtue enters into direct competition with the laws of love, and characters are forced to choose between doing what is right in terms of the chivalric code, and what is right according to the rules of courtly love.

JOKE WORK AND SEX WORK: COURTIERS AND SOLDADEIRAS

JOKE WORK AND SEX WORK: COURTIERS AND SOLDADEIRAS By Benjamin M. Liu REEL: Revista Eletronica de de Estudos Literarios, No.5 (2009) Abstract: The frequent jokes in the cantigas d’escarnho e de mal dizer about female sex workers, or soldadeiras, reveal courtly preoccupations concerning labor as well as gender. These repeated poetic games among men, shared […]

New perspectives on mortality in medieval England: a comparison of Winchester and New Colleges (c.1390-1540) with Benedictine monasteries at Canterbury, Westminster and Durham

New perspectives on mortality in medieval England: a comparison of Winchester and New Colleges (c.1390-1540) with Benedictine monasteries at Canterbury, Westminster and Durham By Rebecca Oakes Paper given at Death, disease, environment and social status: new approaches to mortality in England 1380-1860, held at the University of Cambridge (2009) Introduction: The late medieval period is […]

The crusading plans during the fourteenth and fifteenth century

The crusade of this period is completely a different image which differs in the meanings and aims from the old ordinary plans.

Pre-Norman Crosses West Cheshire and the Norse Settlements around the Irish Sea

Pre-Norman Crosses West Cheshire and the Norse Settlements around the Irish Sea By J.D. Bu’Lock Transactions of the Lancashire and Cheshire Antiquarian Society, Vol. 68 (1958) Introduction: Despite some intermingling (mainly in and around the Kingdom of York), the two Scandinavian elements in Britain – Danish and Norse Irish – remained somewhat localized and distinct, […]

Royal Diplomacy in Renaissance Italy: Ferrante d’Aragona (1458-1494) and his Ambassadors

Royal Diplomacy in Renaissance Italy: Ferrante d’Aragona (1458-1494) and his Ambassadors By Paul M. Dover Mediterranean Studies, Volume 14, Number 1 (2005) Abstract: This article examines the diplomatic challenges faced by the king of Naples, Ferrante d’Aragona (1458-1494) and the activity of his ambassadors in meeting those challenges. It identifies Rome, Florence and Milan as […]

Medical ‘Emplotment’ and Plotting Medicine: Health and Disease in Late Medieval Portuguese Chronicles

Medical ‘Emplotment’ and Plotting Medicine: Health and Disease in Late Medieval Portuguese Chronicles By Iona McCleery Social History of Medicine (2011) Abstract: In recent years, historians of medicine in the Middle Ages have tried to decode narratives of health and illness in their original context, attempting to uncover the meanings they may have had for […]

medievalverse magazine