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Constructing the Headdresses of the Fourteenth and Fifteenth Centuries

Constructing the Headdresses of the Fourteenth and Fifteenth Centuries

By Marie Vibbert (Lyonnete Vibert)

Known World Costume Symposium Proceedings (2005)

Introduction: From the comics pages to Halloween costumes, we continue to see representations of the dynamic headdresses of the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries. Social and technological forces joined to create a time of great change in fashion which has never wholly left the public imagination. The purpose of this paper is to explore the development and possible construction of men and women’s headdresses of this time, primarily those of France and those countries with immediate French contact: England, Germany, and the Low Countries. Due to a paucity of extant evidence, the majority of research concerns representations in illustration or sculpture.

The practice of veil-wearing was not so strict in the fourteenth century as the fifteenth; at least, it is common to find representations of women without them. Women are depicted wearing either uncovered hair, a hood, or a veil.

Click here to read this article from Case Western Reserve University

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