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Archives for March 2011

A Pictish burial and Late Norse/Medieval settlement at Sangobeg, Durness, Sutherland

A Pictish burial and Late Norse/Medieval settlement at Sangobeg, Durness, Sutherland By Keven Brady, Olivia Lelong and Colleen Batey Scottish Archaeological Journal, Vol.29:1 (2007) Abstract: Salvage excavation was carried out on an archaeological site, discovered during the North Sutherland Coastal Zone Assessment Survey in 1998, in dunes at Sangobeg, near Durness in northern Sutherland. The […]

The Staffordshire Hoard Fieldwork, 2009-2010

The Staffordshire Hoard Fieldwork, 2009-2010 By Alex Jones Paper given at the Staffordshire Hoard Symposium, held at the British Museum, March, 2010 Summary: Two stages of fieldwork were undertaken at the site of the Staffordshire Hoard. The first, in July-August 2009, was solely concerned with the safe and systematic recovery of the hoard. Test-pitting was followed […]

Rare 15th century copy of Book of Calculation by Fibonacci goes up for auction

A fifteenth-century copy of a medieval mathematical book is expected to sell for between $120,000 and 180,000 at a New York City auction later this year. The Liber Abaci or Book of Calculation was written around the year 1202, by Leonardo Pisano Bigollo, who is better known as Fibonacci. He is widely credited with bringing […]

The Ordination of Women in the Early Middle Ages

The author analyzes a number of references to the ordination of women in the early Middle Ages in light of the meaning given to ordination at that time and in the context of the ministries of early medieval women

Unauthorised miracles in mid-ninth-century Dijon and the Carolingian church reforms

In the early 840s, Archbishop Amolo of Lyons wrote to one of his suffragan bishops about extraordinary miracles reportedly taking place at Dijon in the wake of the arrival of mysterious new relics.

Representing the Negative: Positing the Lesbian Void in Medieval English Anchoritism

Moreover, the anchoritic cell provided something that the majority of medieval households did not have – a private space. This space was specifically female, specifically female-controlled, and specifically eroticized.

“De Hedificiis Communibus Murandis …”: Notes on the Beginning of Building Regulations in Medieval Tuscany

The formation of the independent town in Italy during the eleventh and twelfth centuries is a central theme of historic sciences.

Gylfaginning and Early Medieval Conversion Theory

Gylfaginning and Early Medieval Conversion Theory By Christopher Abram Saga-Book, Vol. 33 (2009) Introduction: Snorra Edda’s attitude towards pagan religion, and its possible antecedents in medieval Christian thought, have been the subject of much debate. For the most part, these discussions have centred on the Prologue to Snorra Edda, although Gylfaginning and the early parts […]

Cardigan Castle receives £4.7m grant

Cardigan Castle, which dates back to the eleventh century, has received a grant of nearly £4.7m from the Heritage Lottery Fund (HLF) to save the iconic building and create a major heritage visitor destination. Cadwgan Building Preservation Trust have been campaigning since 2001 to save the Castle’s 840 year history. They went into partnership with […]

Drinking and Debauchery: Fifty Ways to Leave Your Beowulf (Butchered)

The filmic renditions analysed are Zemeckis’s 2007 performance capture Beowulf (the Hollywood version), and Sturla Gunnarsson’s Beowulf and Grendel (2005, a Canadian-Icelandic production): they both deviate from the original poem, but given their closeness in date, the different treatment is so considerable as to warrant comparison.

Medieval Mystery Plays: Cain and Abel

The medieval playwrights take the brief thirteen-verse account from the fourth chapter of Genesis and expand it into a play—the N-town version is the shortest of the medieval Cain and Abel plays and the Wakefield version is the longest.

The enigmatic threatening Margery Kempe

Perhaps no person has aroused more interest and suspicion than Margery Kempe, alive to us in her autobiography The Book of Margery Kempe.

Child Mortality and Amartya Sen’s Discussion of the Standard of Living

Child Mortality and Amartya Sen’s Discussion of the Standard of Living By Kayla Jacobs Published Online (2006) Introduction: A baby born in America today has a pretty good chance of making it to adulthood: only a bit more than 0.6% of US infants die (CIA World Factbook). It also has a pretty good chance of […]

Asceticism, differentiation, government : ‘anorexia nervosa’ as an achievement

Asceticism, differentiation, government : ‘anorexia nervosa’ as an achievement By Gordon Tait The Australian Sociological Association Conference (1992) Introduction: From the thirteenth to the sixteenth centuries in Europe, it was not uncommon for young women to starve themselves to death. This fasting was done as a form of personal piety, and was lauded as an […]

Commerce and Coexistence: Muslims in the Economy and Society of Norman Sicily

Commerce and Coexistence: Muslims in the Economy and Society of Norman Sicily By Timothy James Smit PhD Dissertation, University of Minnesota, 2009 Abstract: This dissertation aims to assess the economic role that Muslims played in Norman Sicily, and how that economic role tied them into the society of Norman Sicily in general. Muslims in Sicily […]

Where Cornish was Spoken and When: a Provisional Synthesis

Roman colonial rule in much of Britain from the mid-first century AD represented language contact as well as major changes to material culture and many other aspects of life.

The Problem of Cathar Apocalypticism

Of all the heresies in the Middle Ages, none posed more of a threat to the Catholic Church in either perception or reality than did Catharism.

Medieval management of spinal injuries: parallels between Theodoric of Bologna and contemporary spine surgeons

Theodoric of Bologna, in his text Chiurgica de Theodoric (ca. AD 1267), described an extracorporeal approach to the management of traumatic spinal column misalignments.

The Beheading Game in Sir Gawain and the Green Knight and The Green Helmet

The earliest recorded version of the beheading game dates back to about 1100, although it is believed that the story itself may be much older than its Middle Irish prose account

A Syrian-Christian Perspective on the Supernatural

A Syrian-Christian Perspective on the Supernatural By Silke Trzcionka Paper given at the Western Pacific Rim Patristics Society Inaugural Conference (2004) Introduction: Whenever anyone looks with envy upon beautiful objects, the ambient air becomes charged with a malignant quality, and that person’s breath, laden with bitterness, blows hard upon the person near him. This breath, […]

The worldview of women in demotic historic, akritic and epic poetry of the late Byzantine period (9th century to 1453)

The worldview of women in demotic historic, akritic and epic poetry of the late Byzantine period (9th century to 1453) By Virginia A. Deligatos Master’s Thesis, University of Johannesburg, 2008 Abstract: A study is conducted into the roles of women living in the late Byzantine period between the 6th Century to 1453, using demotic or […]

The Typochronology of Sword Pommels from the Staffordshire Hoard

The Typochronology of Sword Pommels from the Staffordshire Hoard By Svante Fischer and Jean Soulat Paper given at the Staffordshire Hoard Symposium, held at the British Museum, March, 2010 Introduction: Typology and Chronology do not equate or coalesce into typochronology. Why is this? Human agency in time and space prevents material culture from manifesting itself in […]

The Albigensian Crusade: A Comparative Military Study, 1209-1218

The Albigensian Crusade: A Comparative Military Study, 1209-1218 By Michael Taulier Abstract: This thesis addresses the military aspects of the Albigensian Crusade in the region of Languedoc between 1209 and 1218. The purpose of the research is to move beyond the conventional focus on Catharism and its attendant heresy in order to examine the martial […]

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